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Jambo_jim2001
9 minutes ago, Greedy Jambo said:

 

better than 'ask the lampost' i suppose. 

Unless you are wired up to it🤫🤫

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1 minute ago, Jambo_jim2001 said:

Unless you are wired up to it🤫🤫

He’s ‘wired up’ to something, that’s for sure.  👀

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Jambo_jim2001
4 minutes ago, Greedy Jambo said:

Sorry, that's gone right over my head. 

Save money wire house up to the lampost🧐🤫

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France are having to import energy because of the heat wave they are having, they are having to cut output at nuclear plants as the river water temperature is too high to cool down the reactors.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-03/edf-to-curb-nuclear-output-as-french-energy-crisis-worsens

 

France is often lauded for having such a high percentage of nuclear energy plants and with it cheap energy prices, however in a warming world maybe nuclear isn't the way forward either, especially when the rivers begin to run dry, as has happened to many in France, over a 100 towns/villages have ran out of drinking water and supplies are having to be brought in by trucks.

https://www.euronews.com/my-europe/2022/08/05/more-than-100-french-towns-without-drinking-water-amid-historic-drought

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Spain is now setting new laws regarding energy use.

Such as no air con till 27° and heating till below 19°. .There are other restrictions on energy use.

It's being sold as sacrifice for Ukraine war amongst other things.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/costa-del-sol-spain-air-conditioning-energy-saving-rules-british-tourists-b1016853.html

 

Some argue that we should be doing this anyway .

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joondalupjambo
7 minutes ago, Konrad von Carstein said:

What's the advice for when your current energy deal runs out?

Fix it again or what?

Mines runs expires next month  :(

 

Go to Money Saving Expert and follow links from main menu to Gas/Electric bills.  Fixing suggested if certain % above the standard tariff you are being offered.  Like you my fixed runs out next month and based on that advice I am best to go with the standard tariff.  However it will all depend on what your company is offering you.  Good luck.

Edited by joondalupjambo
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Konrad von Carstein
2 minutes ago, joondalupjambo said:

Go to Money Saving Expert and follow links from main menu to Gas/Electric bills.  Fixing suggested if certain % above the standard tariff you are being offered.  Like you my fixed runs out next month and based on that advice I am best to go with the standard tariff.  However it will all depend on what your company is offering you.  Good luck.

Thanks. Am with Eon will have a look at MSE.

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Konrad von Carstein
17 minutes ago, Cade said:

Good luck finding any company that will offer you a fixed tariff right now

Eon have offered me one, estimated cost over the year >£4K compared to the variable tariff of circa £2.5K :lol:

 

0️⃣

 

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2 hours ago, Ked said:

Spain is now setting new laws regarding energy use.

Such as no air con till 27° and heating till below 19°. .There are other restrictions on energy use.

It's being sold as sacrifice for Ukraine war amongst other things.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/costa-del-sol-spain-air-conditioning-energy-saving-rules-british-tourists-b1016853.html

 

Some argue that we should be doing this anyway .

Absolutely I mean who put heating on at 19c that’s still roasting 😂

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, GBJambo said:

Absolutely I mean who put heating on at 19c that’s still roasting 😂

 

 

 

 

Shorts & t-shirt weather in Scotland, in Spain though, probably hats gloves & thick padded coats. :laugh:

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1 minute ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Shorts & t-shirt weather in Scotland, in Spain though, probably hats gloves & thick padded coats. :laugh:

They need to toughen up then 😂

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joondalupjambo
2 hours ago, Cade said:

Good luck finding any company that will offer you a fixed tariff right now

SSE offered me one.  It could be if you are coming off a fixed one they offer you something.  It was not a great offer though so sticking with standard tariff, wearing three jersey's a coat and a hat, no baths, going to the library and golf club to use their heating, putting on wood burner now and again and keeping the usage down😀

 

Only kidding, and should not be so flippant because there will be some real hardship out there this winter.  We are lucky and have a cushion so will not be too bad.

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23 minutes ago, joondalupjambo said:

SSE offered me one.  It could be if you are coming off a fixed one they offer you something.  It was not a great offer though so sticking with standard tariff, wearing three jersey's a coat and a hat, no baths, going to the library and golf club to use their heating, putting on wood burner now and again and keeping the usage down😀

 

Only kidding, and should not be so flippant because there will be some real hardship out there this winter.  We are lucky and have a cushion so will not be too bad.

 

Everytime I've heard Martin Lewis go on about fixed rates, it's always been extortionate amounts he's been quoted, he's said for months that the best rates right now are the standard tariff's.  It'll probably be a few years before decent fixed term offers return to the market place.

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5 hours ago, Ked said:

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2022-08-04/european-energy-crisis-germany-s-switch-to-diesel-comes-at-a-cost

 .The cost increase of diesel will affect us all .

And the continued burning of fossil fuel which was never mentioned in the article.Im not sure if there's much difference between diesel or gas in harm.

 

 

Gas has a higher energy content, burns cleaner and more efficiently so you don't need as much of it for the same output. You also have the added benefits of zero combustion residues (such as tars, particulates and other gunk) that accumulates and eventually needs dealt with and almost zero sulfur oxide emissions (sulfur containing compounds are removed during processing, with the exception of ethyl mercaptan which is added to give it the gas 'smell' - but its ppb level amounts). 

 

It's not the answer, but gas is by far the 'cleanest' fossil fuel.

Edited by trotter
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joondalupjambo
49 minutes ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Everytime I've heard Martin Lewis go on about fixed rates, it's always been extortionate amounts he's been quoted, he's said for months that the best rates right now are the standard tariff's.  It'll probably be a few years before decent fixed term offers return to the market place

Yeah that was my understanding when hearing him but he has a formula in his website that kind of makes some sense.  However it is all depends on who you are with, your current standard tariff with them and if that formula helps or not.  My impression now was that for a very few there was a chance fix would help.  Agree though, and he still says it vast majority need to go standard.

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4 hours ago, Konrad von Carstein said:

What's the advice for when your current energy deal runs out?

Fix it again or what?

Mines runs expires next month  :(

 

Just burn the final reminders when they start sending you the bills in the winter. Two birds with one stone and all that...

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4 minutes ago, trotter said:

Gas has a higher energy content, burns cleaner and more efficiently so you don't need as much of it for the same output. You also have the added benefits of zero combustion residues (such as tars, particulates and other gunk) that accumulates and eventually needs dealt with and almost zero sulfur oxide emissions (sulfur containing compounds are removed during processing, with the exception of ethyl mercaptan which is added to give it the gas 'smell' - but its ppb level amounts). 

 

It's not the answer, but gas is by far the 'cleanest' fossil fuel.

Thanks.

So an extra 2,00 000barrels of diesel  oil  for Europe, conservative estimates, from October.

Diesel price rise usage rise and it would seem temperatures .

Buckle up.

 

 

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2 hours ago, joondalupjambo said:

Yeah that was my understanding when hearing him but he has a formula in his website that kind of makes some sense.  However it is all depends on who you are with, your current standard tariff with them and if that formula helps or not.  My impression now was that for a very few there was a chance fix would help.  Agree though, and he still says it vast majority need to go standard.

 

I've gone fixed as the offer was less than the expected 78% rise.

 

I was at £155 per month, the 78% increase takes that to £275. Fixed at £225.

 

I can also exit at any time, penalty free.

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Business

Why the ‘battery of Europe’ threatens to exacerbate Britain’s winter energy crisis

National Grid hopes to be able to rely on Norway – but in Oslo, energy is turning toxic

Perched on the edge of Lake Suldalsvatnet, few Britons will have heard of the Kvilldal power station.

Yet this hydroelectric plant – Norway’s largest, with capacity to power 1.7m homes – may soon play a pivotal role in keeping their lights on.

The site is one being relied on by the National Grid to provide power when the electricity network is most stretched this winter.

It is directly linked to the UK via a 450-mile interconnector that travels through underground tunnels, into the great Bokna Fjord and along the bed of the North Sea, before resurfacing in Blyth.

According to the National Grid, it allows us to tap clean power on demand when the wind isn’t blowing and our offshore turbines are standing idle. 

But this link – and others between Norway and its neighbours – is fast becoming a toxic issue for politicians in Oslo as its electricity prices rocket.

Norway’s energy troubles do not stem from a dependence on Russian natural gas. An abundance of mountain plateaus, natural lakes and fjords has allowed it to generate almost all of its electricity through hydropower for decades, backed up by small amounts of gas and wind power generation.

It is also the third largest exporter of natural gas in the world, behind only Russia and Qatar, leading some to describe Norway as the “battery of Europe”.  

Now, however, as Europe faces an energy crisis in the wake of Putin’s invasion, foreign demand for Norway’s power is having a stark impact on its consumers.

'Norway will come first'

As electricity export prices increase, so have its domestic tariffs – to record-breaking levels this summer.

Morten Frisch, a Norwegian energy consultant based in the UK, says prices this year have typically been 10 to 20 times higher than previously, adding: “This is not something people can afford to pay”.

The problem is exacerbating regional disparities, because most of Norway’s interconnectors are based in the south. 

While electricity can cost €2 per megawatt (£1.69) for households in northern areas, prices in south western Norway can be €550 per megawatt, according to Frisch.

The toll on Norway is not just financial, however. It relies on reservoirs to feed its hydroelectric plants, mostly refilled by rain or melting snow. Following a dry spell during the spring and summer, the reservoirs were last month reduced to a 20-year low of 46pc of capacity in the south west.

“This is not something you can just fill up at will,” Frisch explains. “When they run dry, they run dry, and it's likely to take a minimum of three months, possibly six months, before they can be refilled by rain. 

For Oslo’s government, this has made the subject of foreign power exports increasingly thorny. Some campaigners have called for Norway to cut itself off from Europe.

A Facebook group named Vi som krever billigere strøm (meaning ‘we who demand cheaper electricity’) has more than 600,000 members. Users complain of a “price contagion” spreading from the likes of Britain and Germany and call on Prime Minister Jonas Gahr Støre to take action.

Støre has argued that staying connected to Europe benefits Norway and means it can tap foreign power if needed, telling the Aftenposten newspaper: “There is reciprocity in this”. 

Yet there is pressure for a rethink. The country’s parliament could be recalled as soon as this week to discuss fresh measures to tackle the crisis. 

Ministers have discussed beefing up government support to consumers, and floated the possibility of power export restrictions. Støre’s minority Labour government is currently propped up by the Central party and relies on opposition parties to pass laws. 

Last week, Terje Aasland, the oil and energy minister, told the Verdens Gang newspaper that “concrete measures” were being devised to “limit exports when the degree of hydroelectric water reservoir filling is below a certain level.

“When there is little water in the hydroelectric water reservoirs, Norway will come first”.

It is likely to prompt further questions for the National Grid about whether Britain can rely upon Norway. 

The Grid claims there will be plenty of electricity available this winter, with a forecast buffer capacity of four gigawatts, or 6.7pc. However, this is based on expectations that the UK can draw on 5.7 gigawatts of power from Europe, or roughly 10pc of demand at peak times. That includes 1.4 gigawatts from Norway. 

“I don't think the UK should rely on the 1.4 gigawatts coming,” Frisch says.

A Grid spokesman previously said it was “important to note that a stress period in Great Britain coinciding with one in Europe is extremely unlikely and to date has never happened before.”

A UK Government spokesman insisted that Britain had "secure and diverse energy supplies", including gas reserves in the North Sea. He added that the North Sea Link with Norway would bring "stability and security to both our countries’ power markets – bringing mutual benefits and ensuring efficient electricity trading".

Kathryn Porter, a UK energy analyst behind the consultancy Watt Logic, thinks the British and Norwegian governments should discuss in more detail what would happen in that unlikely scenario - and whether we can do more to help Norway.

The UK could agree to send more power to Norway in the months ahead of winter to reduce strain on its reservoirs, for instance.

“If they use that water today, then it really won’t be available tomorrow,” she adds. “Foreign demand is using up a scarce resource that is supposed to benefit the citizens of Norway, who paid for it.”

That is worth remembering this winter, when flipping a light switch in Britain uses power generated more than 400 miles away in Kvilldal.

 

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17 minutes ago, Imaman said:

Business

Why the ‘battery of Europe’ threatens to exacerbate Britain’s winter energy crisis

National Grid hopes to be able to rely on Norway – but in Oslo, energy is turning toxic

Perched on the edge of Lake Suldalsvatnet, few Britons will have heard of the Kvilldal power station.

Yet this hydroelectric plant – Norway’s largest, with capacity to power 1.7m homes – may soon play a pivotal role in keeping their lights on.

The site is one being relied on by the National Grid to provide power when the electricity network is most stretched this winter.

It is directly linked to the UK via a 450-mile interconnector that travels through underground tunnels, into the great Bokna Fjord and along the bed of the North Sea, before resurfacing in Blyth.

According to the National Grid, it allows us to tap clean power on demand when the wind isn’t blowing and our offshore turbines are standing idle. 

But this link – and others between Norway and its neighbours – is fast becoming a toxic issue for politicians in Oslo as its electricity prices rocket.

Norway’s energy troubles do not stem from a dependence on Russian natural gas. An abundance of mountain plateaus, natural lakes and fjords has allowed it to generate almost all of its electricity through hydropower for decades, backed up by small amounts of gas and wind power generation.

It is also the third largest exporter of natural gas in the world, behind only Russia and Qatar, leading some to describe Norway as the “battery of Europe”.  

Now, however, as Europe faces an energy crisis in the wake of Putin’s invasion, foreign demand for Norway’s power is having a stark impact on its consumers.

'Norway will come first'

As electricity export prices increase, so have its domestic tariffs – to record-breaking levels this summer.

Morten Frisch, a Norwegian energy consultant based in the UK, says prices this year have typically been 10 to 20 times higher than previously, adding: “This is not something people can afford to pay”.

The problem is exacerbating regional disparities, because most of Norway’s interconnectors are based in the south. 

While electricity can cost €2 per megawatt (£1.69) for households in northern areas, prices in south western Norway can be €550 per megawatt, according to Frisch.

The toll on Norway is not just financial, however. It relies on reservoirs to feed its hydroelectric plants, mostly refilled by rain or melting snow. Following a dry spell during the spring and summer, the reservoirs were last month reduced to a 20-year low of 46pc of capacity in the south west.

“This is not something you can just fill up at will,” Frisch explains. “When they run dry, they run dry, and it's likely to take a minimum of three months, possibly six months, before they can be refilled by rain. 

For Oslo’s government, this has made the subject of foreign power exports increasingly thorny. Some campaigners have called for Norway to cut itself off from Europe.

A Facebook group named Vi som krever billigere strøm (meaning ‘we who demand cheaper electricity’) has more than 600,000 members. Users complain of a “price contagion” spreading from the likes of Britain and Germany and call on Prime Minister Jonas Gahr Støre to take action.

Støre has argued that staying connected to Europe benefits Norway and means it can tap foreign power if needed, telling the Aftenposten newspaper: “There is reciprocity in this”. 

Yet there is pressure for a rethink. The country’s parliament could be recalled as soon as this week to discuss fresh measures to tackle the crisis. 

Ministers have discussed beefing up government support to consumers, and floated the possibility of power export restrictions. Støre’s minority Labour government is currently propped up by the Central party and relies on opposition parties to pass laws. 

Last week, Terje Aasland, the oil and energy minister, told the Verdens Gang newspaper that “concrete measures” were being devised to “limit exports when the degree of hydroelectric water reservoir filling is below a certain level.

“When there is little water in the hydroelectric water reservoirs, Norway will come first”.

It is likely to prompt further questions for the National Grid about whether Britain can rely upon Norway. 

The Grid claims there will be plenty of electricity available this winter, with a forecast buffer capacity of four gigawatts, or 6.7pc. However, this is based on expectations that the UK can draw on 5.7 gigawatts of power from Europe, or roughly 10pc of demand at peak times. That includes 1.4 gigawatts from Norway. 

“I don't think the UK should rely on the 1.4 gigawatts coming,” Frisch says.

A Grid spokesman previously said it was “important to note that a stress period in Great Britain coinciding with one in Europe is extremely unlikely and to date has never happened before.”

A UK Government spokesman insisted that Britain had "secure and diverse energy supplies", including gas reserves in the North Sea. He added that the North Sea Link with Norway would bring "stability and security to both our countries’ power markets – bringing mutual benefits and ensuring efficient electricity trading".

Kathryn Porter, a UK energy analyst behind the consultancy Watt Logic, thinks the British and Norwegian governments should discuss in more detail what would happen in that unlikely scenario - and whether we can do more to help Norway.

The UK could agree to send more power to Norway in the months ahead of winter to reduce strain on its reservoirs, for instance.

“If they use that water today, then it really won’t be available tomorrow,” she adds. “Foreign demand is using up a scarce resource that is supposed to benefit the citizens of Norway, who paid for it.”

That is worth remembering this winter, when flipping a light switch in Britain uses power generated more than 400 miles away in Kvilldal.

 

 

I would not be shocked nor surprised that there are widespread power cuts all over Europe, especially if it's a hard winter.

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4 minutes ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

I would not be shocked nor surprised that there are widespread power cuts all over Europe, especially if it's a hard winter.

We need to up our self sufficiency as far as power goes. By any means possible IMO 

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4 minutes ago, The Mighty Thor said:

No handouts while your bill goes up to 500 a month. 

 

You'll get 1p off tax though worth 160 a year 😂

They need to commit to taxing the huge profits bring made by the energy companies. 

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2 minutes ago, The Mighty Thor said:

No handouts while your bill goes up to 500 a month. 

 

You'll get 1p off tax though worth 160 a year 😂

 

Yip heard that on the news, Truss saying that there would be no more handouts.

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The Mighty Thor
1 minute ago, Imaman said:

They need to commit to taxing the huge profits bring made by the energy companies. 

No they're going to cut corporation tax to allow them to make more money.

 

While you freeze, starve or both. 

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7 minutes ago, Imaman said:

We need to up our self sufficiency as far as power goes. By any means possible IMO 

 

If Russia completely cut supplies of oil & gas to Europe during the winter, which there is every chance they will do, then any country including the UK which has any supplies of oil and or gas will be forced to drill, frack or mine it.

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1 hour ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Yip heard that on the news, Truss saying that there would be no more handouts.

 

Riots will be coming if that is their attitude.

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1 hour ago, The Mighty Thor said:

No handouts while your bill goes up to 500 a month. 

 

You'll get 1p off tax though worth 160 a year 😂

 

What a nasty, horrible bad hearted piece of shit she is. Her parents are dyed in the wool lefties as well. They must be horrified at the selfish ***** they raised. 

 

Unprecedented cost of living crisis, energy bills through the roof and she's basically tossed us a few pennies and expecting praise for it. 

 

Elderly people are going to die this winter because of the choices of this government. 

 

Its ****ing unconscionable. 

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Jambof3tornado
13 hours ago, Ked said:

Spain is now setting new laws regarding energy use.

Such as no air con till 27° and heating till below 19°. .There are other restrictions on energy use.

It's being sold as sacrifice for Ukraine war amongst other things.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/costa-del-sol-spain-air-conditioning-energy-saving-rules-british-tourists-b1016853.html

 

Some argue that we should be doing this anyway .

Sounds like my house(without the air con). If its 19°c in the front room then no heating required!!!!

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5 hours ago, frankblack said:

 

Riots will be coming if that is their attitude.

We'll have to riot to keep warm.......

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FinnBarr Saunders
8 minutes ago, Section Q said:

We'll have to riot to keep warm.......

 

Not making light of the situation but fluffy dressing gowns are the way to go.

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The Mighty Thor
4 hours ago, FinnBarr Saunders said:

 

Not making light of the situation but fluffy dressing gowns are the way to go.

image.thumb.png.fad4e5c9cb92c79e32cc5fd1c7f9ba5e.png

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Glad I never switched to DD's and I still pay quarterly via a manually entered meter reading for gas and electricity.

 

I put money aside each month to cover the quarterly cost when the bill arrives and if I want to limit my power consumption to save I can and there is no 'credit' that I can't withdraw from these corrupt energy companies as they never see any of it in the first place.

 

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Konrad von Carstein
19 minutes ago, kila said:

Glad I never switched to DD's and I still pay quarterly via a manually entered meter reading for gas and electricity.

 

I put money aside each month to cover the quarterly cost when the bill arrives and if I want to limit my power consumption to save I can and there is no 'credit' that I can't withdraw from these corrupt energy companies as they never see any of it in the first place.

 

I was around £500 in credit earlier this year. Eon paid £350 into my account on request.

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9 minutes ago, Konrad von Carstein said:

I was around £500 in credit earlier this year. Eon paid £350 into my account on request.

 

I don't like the idea of being in credit with a company who are at it with profiteering. If you asked for the full £500 because you're switching suppliers would they have given you it?

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Konrad von Carstein
1 minute ago, kila said:

 

I don't like the idea of being in credit with a company who are at it with profiteering. If you asked for the full £500 because you're switching suppliers would they have given you it?

I would imagine so, it would be theft not to.

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3 hours ago, kila said:

 

I don't like the idea of being in credit with a company who are at it with profiteering. If you asked for the full £500 because you're switching suppliers would they have given you it?

They have to give you it. Some company said I moved to them and Scottish power owed me about a grand I didn't even know they owed me. :laugh2: Spent it on rubbish.

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4 hours ago, kila said:

 

I don't like the idea of being in credit with a company who are at it with profiteering. If you asked for the full £500 because you're switching suppliers would they have given you it?

 

Yes they have to refund the full amount, less the cost of the energy you've used up to your transfer date.

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Harry Potter
4 hours ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Yes they have to refund the full amount, less the cost of the energy you've used up to your transfer date.

be lucky if anyone is in credit with these profit loving sharks. biggest rip-off ever.

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Put the energy cap back on and stop people suffering. The companies can profit when we come out the other side of  inflation hardship and when we can afford to pay higher prices, when everyone has a better wage.

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The Real Maroonblood
33 minutes ago, ri Alban said:

Put the energy cap back on and stop people suffering. The companies can profit when we come out the other side of  inflation hardship and when we can afford to pay higher prices, when everyone has a better wage.

Fat chance of that happening with these scumbags.

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Just now, The Real Maroonblood said:

Fat chance of that happening with these scumbags.

They and their apologists on here, tell us there is nothing they can do. There's plenty they can do, but won't. Reinstate the cap from before, stop the NI rise, cut VAT, half the tax on fuel duty and stop demonising public sector workers and get them paid properly, so they can get on with their lives. Work to live, not live to work.

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