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James Anderson interview


Agentjambo

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rudi must stay

I wonder if he is invited on Queen Ann's boat. I've heard the hot tub is where all big decisions are made 

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Boyces beard

Basically telling the greeting faced fans (myself included) to stop shouting for the manager and the boards heads after every bad result. I will take notice, especially when a man of Mr Andersons stature speaks out on such matters. We are lucky to have him at our club and on our board and i agree with Selkirk in wondering if he has bigger and better things planned for our football club. 

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Jambo-Fox

Feels like he’s an ‘out of the box thinker’ and hasn’t got maroon blinkers on so he can see a bigger picture!!

 

Once Hearts are up there challenging I’d be delighted if the FOH sold their (our) 75.1% shareholding to him!

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Bull's-eye

The goon squad should take note.

 

Unfortunately Mr Anderson, possiblity in his current role cannot comment on the 12th man that both bigots have on the pitch and if any club ever dares to get close a 12th man appears on the opposite side.

 

This piss poor excuse for a league also insures a clear run for the bigots. Lets not forget they play 80% of games at home.

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Led Tasso

Set to be slaughtered on JKB as a happy clapper.

 

"There are outliers, of course, but the notion that you can improve things by merely sacking the manager is just completely wrong. We should be able to get on a self-replicating higher level: European football, more revenue, more potential for players to be sold. There has been fundamentally a failure of the other Scottish clubs going back to the Ferguson-McLean era at Aberdeen and Dundee United.

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ToadKiller Dog

He is right of course, but football supporters emotions and passion often than not overtakes common sense .

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Bull's-eye
5 minutes ago, ToadKiller Dog said:

He is right of course, but football supporters emotions and passion often than not overtakes common sense .

 

Not the supporters with common sense 😉

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Agentjambo

The following quotes puzzle me…

 

He said: "I find the sheer dominance of Rangers and Celtic puzzling.

 

"If you go through different European countries in all of their leagues, there have been serious challenges to the big two or big three. These may not end up in you winning the league but it does amount to a serious challenge and it does change the structure of the club and its aspirations”.

 

The fact we aren’t challenging maybe has to do with budget and quality of player/squad.Unless heavy spending/investment in the playing squad we won’t be challenging.

 

 

 


 

 

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Tokyo Drifter
7 minutes ago, Agentjambo said:

The following quotes puzzle me…

 

He said: "I find the sheer dominance of Rangers and Celtic puzzling.

 

"If you go through different European countries in all of their leagues, there have been serious challenges to the big two or big three. These may not end up in you winning the league but it does amount to a serious challenge and it does change the structure of the club and its aspirations”.

 

The fact we aren’t challenging maybe has to do with budget and quality of player/squad.Unless heavy spending/investment in the playing squad we won’t be challenging.

 

 

 


 

 

I've always thought you need a big three at least for challenges to be sustainable. When it's a duopoly, it's very hard. Can't think of another league in Europe that only has two 'big' sides. Even Portugal, which is most comparable to Scotland, has three: Sporting, Benfica and Porto. That increased competition helps sides like Braga. 

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periodictabledancer
23 minutes ago, Led Tasso said:

Set to be slaughtered on JKB as a happy clapper.

 

"There are outliers, of course, but the notion that you can improve things by merely sacking the manager is just completely wrong. We should be able to get on a self-replicating higher level: European football, more revenue, more potential for players to be sold. There has been fundamentally a failure of the other Scottish clubs going back to the Ferguson-McLean era at Aberdeen and Dundee United.

He's saying what the fans are saying. So if it's not happening and changing managers isn't the answer, what is ?

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Vlad Magic
1 hour ago, rudi must stay said:

I wonder if he is invited on Queen Ann's boat. I've heard the hot tub is where all big decisions are made 


Your mask has slipped.

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Sacking a manager/head coach isn't often the answer but appointing the right guy in the first place could be.

 

I desperately want Stevie to succeed. I'm sure we all do.

 

Avoiding the upheaval of change, especially mid-season, benefits everyone involved with the club and I hope, as the season wears on, that the board's decision looks like a good one.

 

I have my doubts but there's been just enough, imo, to give Stevie more time.

 

The January break is the time to reflect and see if we're going in the right direction.

 

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Vlad Magic

I would rather trust the opinion of someone self made, makes good decisions and worth X million through good decision making than hambojambo1874 on here.

 

Hoping also the “Naismith” out brigade will pipe down.

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Pasquale for King

If he doesn’t know by now why the uglies dominate Scottish football he doesn’t really understand the nature of the game here. 

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Led Tasso
4 minutes ago, periodictabledancer said:

He's saying what the fans are saying. So if it's not happening and changing managers isn't the answer, what is ?

This is the preceding bit:

 

Quote

The last match is all that matters and if it goes the wrong way then it is 'sack the board, sack the manager.'The more you look at the data, there is evidence that tells you that there is much more chance in all of this in the short term and most managers don’t make a difference.

 

I don't think he's saying, "never sack the manager." What he's saying is that he disagrees with all the calls to sack Robbie after Brora or Naisy after our poor start. Robbie had to be sacked when he was and we were all on board with that, but I think Anderson would disagree that it should have been far sooner.

 

And FWIW this is pretty strongly where I am. Clubs that sack managers quickly are never near the tops of tables. Even exceptions like Chelsea prove the rule—with a couple of exceptions, they had their best seasons during periods when they had stability at manager. Often times the cost of changing managers, both in the payoffs and in the churn that it requires in the squad, is not anywhere near worth the minor improvement in results one might see.

 

It's not popular, but if things aren't going well on the pitch for a short run of games, often the best thing for the top brass to do is absolutely nothing, and let the manager they hired do their best to sort it out.

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BlueRiver
41 minutes ago, Bull's-eye said:

 

Not the supporters with common sense 😉

 

All 6 of them will appreciate your comment. 

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Lone Striker
27 minutes ago, Tokyo Drifter said:

I've always thought you need a big three at least for challenges to be sustainable. When it's a duopoly, it's very hard. Can't think of another league in Europe that only has two 'big' sides. Even Portugal, which is most comparable to Scotland, has three: Sporting, Benfica and Porto. That increased competition helps sides like Braga. 

Thats a very good point.  3 clubs at the top level would take points off each other, which potentially reduces the gap between  3rd & 4th.   Not guaranteed, but likely to.

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BlueRiver
17 minutes ago, Pasquale for King said:

If he doesn’t know by now why the uglies dominate Scottish football he doesn’t really understand the nature of the game here. 

 

Structural issues and the like to one side you'd think he'd be able to note the massive disparity in finances between those two and the rest of us. 

 

Something that only grows with each passing season when Celtic get about 30m for getting pumped all over Europe. 

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25 minutes ago, martoon said:

Sacking a manager/head coach isn't often the answer but appointing the right guy in the first place could be.

 

I desperately want Stevie to succeed. I'm sure we all do.

 

Avoiding the upheaval of change, especially mid-season, benefits everyone involved with the club and I hope, as the season wears on, that the board's decision looks like a good one.

 

I have my doubts but there's been just enough, imo, to give Stevie more time.

 

The January break is the time to reflect and see if we're going in the right direction.

 

Aye.  JA may just be making the point specifically about the sacking of employees at the drop of a hat but there has to be context, as you more or less say, when we go into it alot more. 
 

Did we appoint the right man in the first place?  Was there rigourous groundwork done and all options explored until we reached the decision to whom we thought was the right man?   Or was it rushed and not thought out to match the very ambition JA clearly wants Hearts to have? 
 

 

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Luckies1874
31 minutes ago, Pasquale for King said:

If he doesn’t know by now why the uglies dominate Scottish football he doesn’t really understand the nature of the game here. 

 

Very good to see him actively talking about us. It would be really interesting to hear in far more depth his views as to how he believes we can succeed and do what he appears to be saying we, and other clubs, have failed to do previously. What is his vision and therefore is Hearts something he is committed to for the medium/long term in respect to reaching these goals? He is someone who clearly should command respect given his incredible CV and achievements. Additionally we should all be hugely grateful for his gifting our club large sums from his personal wealth.

 

But the fact remains only significant investment in the playing squad is going to see us get anywhere near the Glasgow pair. Where is that coming from? After next season, for instance, the gift of the 3rd spot receiving automatic group stage European football is going to be gone - how does he expect any manager, Stevie Naismith or otherwise, to qualify through several play off rounds, with the current level of squad and get us into that season after season and thus receiving those windfalls? That simply ain't happening without speculation in the player market.  Likewise how does he anticipate us regularly selling players if we don't have better recruitment in the first place?

 

As @martoon says above I think it would be fantastic if we could have continuity, not chop and change management and a progression that sees us win more points season on season, creating a gap between us and the rest before worrying about competing with the big two but you have to have the right people in place to do that. Currently that remains the huge question. Do we? 

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Graham Thomson
27 minutes ago, Vlad Magic said:

I would rather trust the opinion of someone self made, makes good decisions and worth X million through good decision making than hambojambo1874 on here.

 

Hoping also the “Naismith” out brigade will pipe down.

This 👍👍

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A good manager with good coaching staff is a must.

A squad of good players covering all positions is a must.

A good scouting team with good contacts is a must.

A good board that backs the manager is a must.

James Anderson must make sure all these pieces are a must to tackle Celtic & Rangers dominance.

No success comes without ever person ever corner has to put everything into Hearts becoming successful.

No slacking from players at training, no slacking with scouting and the board making sure it’s the best person

for the jobs with no nepotism. I’m done with ‘It’s not what you know, it’s who you know’.

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Just give us the next 25 years worth of donations in the one go James. We’ll spend £100m and win the league, gain £25m from Champions League each season. Here we go 10 iar!
 

Simples. 

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copa-mundial

Until our player budget for both salary and purchase increase. It'll always be as is. 

No doubt JA could and has the funds to make the necessary changes to make it possible. It's whether he has the gusto to throw his wealth at it making it a 3 way challenge. 

 

We can only hope he may be toying with this idea? 

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periodictabledancer
46 minutes ago, Led Tasso said:

This is the preceding bit:

 

 

I don't think he's saying, "never sack the manager." What he's saying is that he disagrees with all the calls to sack Robbie after Brora or Naisy after our poor start. Robbie had to be sacked when he was and we were all on board with that, but I think Anderson would disagree that it should have been far sooner.

 

And FWIW this is pretty strongly where I am. Clubs that sack managers quickly are never near the tops of tables. Even exceptions like Chelsea prove the rule—with a couple of exceptions, they had their best seasons during periods when they had stability at manager. Often times the cost of changing managers, both in the payoffs and in the churn that it requires in the squad, is not anywhere near worth the minor improvement in results one might see.

 

It's not popular, but if things aren't going well on the pitch for a short run of games, often the best thing for the top brass to do is absolutely nothing, and let the manager they hired do their best to sort it out.

Weird then as he's disagreeing with his own  board, who not only sacked RN but his deputy too. 

Or maybe he wants us all to get behind a player who was past it when he was given a four year deal - according to many on here it was good business because he'd be a good coach after two years or so ( given he was never going to see his contract out as a player) , except he'd never been studying for his badges in the first place. Sounds like he needs to made chair and then he can implement his vision.

 

 

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I like his optimism . I feel like we are overdue an 86 , 98 or 05 . Maybe get it over the line this time 

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Toxteth O'Grady
1 hour ago, periodictabledancer said:

He's saying what the fans are saying. So if it's not happening and changing managers isn't the answer, what is ?

Changing the way we recruit and play?  We can’t beat the OF with a lesser budget trying to match them in the same style - Back to the future? Wimbledon style or Hearts 86. Target man up front and bypass midfield - that was the last time we came close 

 

 

 

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It’s not that puzzling at all really. If we only had to play OF four times rather than eight, then there is a chance. 
 

Either way Heart’s wage bill on first team needs to be at least another £5m higher to have any chance. 
 

Sounds positive though that he is not going anywhere and has greater ambitions and more money to go in. 

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Just now, hearts00 said:

It’s not that puzzling at all really. If we only had to play OF four times rather than eight, then there is a chance. 
 

Either way Heart’s wage bill on first team needs to be at least another £5m higher to have any chance. 
 

Sounds positive though that he is not going anywhere and has greater ambitions and more money to go in. 


That is the sort of vibe I was getting too . I love his positivity and optimism and it sounds like he is planning on sticking around for a bit . Some guy

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23 minutes ago, mitch41 said:

board making sure it’s the best person

for the jobs with no nepotism. I’m done with ‘It’s not what you know, it’s who you know’.

Change the record. How many times to you feel the need to repeat this?  
Give us the latest example of suspected nepotism. 
The contents of kickbabk clearly filter back to the Board. Do you think your repeated shoite is making him more or less likely to keep committed and potentially dig deeper into his deep pockets. 
 

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Marty-man

Longer piece in Mail+

EXCLUSIVE: The man who's given more than £40m to Scottish football talks about Hearts, his dream of challenging the Old Firm ... and getting 'chewed out' by Elon Musk

 

What is the first question to ask someone who has given more than £40million to Scottish football? One seems obvious: what has Scottish football given him back?

James Anderson, investment wizard, Hearts supporter and Glasgow City benefactor, answers after a moment’s pause.

‘Satisfaction? Yes,’ he says. ‘In my view, it is very unpredictable giving money in terms of satisfaction. Football ranks pretty highly. There are various other things I have done in this regard that I am not sure were right, but not football.’

And the thanks? He smiles when it is mentioned that, as a director of Hearts, he must have faced voluble dissent on occasion.

‘Yes, there is something very visceral about all that but, to some extent, I feel the benefits of my career. If you have been chewed out by Elon Musk...’

And Jeff Bezos? ‘No, not so much, but Elon can be quite foul-mouthed.’

The reference to the titans of Tesla and Amazon explains some of Anderson’s story. He made extraordinary profits for Baillie Gifford when he backed both businessmen to rise.

 

Now 64, Anderson was the star stock-picker of the FTSE-100-listed Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust who stepped down as manager of the Baillie Gifford fund in 2021 after more than two decades in which the fund had delivered investors 1,700 per cent in return. It was estimated his investments in Tesla alone had made Baillie Gifford clients $29billion.

But more humble sums have brought spectacular rewards in terms of contentment. ‘Yes, I received many letters of thanks,’ he says of the response to the reported £3m-plus he gave to Scottish football clubs during Covid.

‘I genuinely cannot remember who sent me this but one club said they were able to put up pigeon netting over the disabled people’s seats so they didn’t get messed up. This is the real world. That to me is incredible, wonderful.’

Anderson’s link to Scottish football, however, is deeper than his pockets. The sums are vast but the significance of the game to him is obvious even on the evidence of a chat in an Edinburgh delicatessen that stretches no longer than a football match.

 

The support for football during Covid — also at women’s and youth level — became a commitment to Glasgow City. His wife, Morag, is a director of the club. There is also a shining testimony to the donations in the existence of the SPFL Trust Trophy and the work the trust encourages and supports in the wider community.

So why football as a beneficiary of his largesse?

‘I was brought up in Norwich with an archetypal community club,’ he says. ‘I remember going to watch Norwich beating Liverpool 3-0 with about just three kicks of the ball while Graeme Souness was chasing about in irritation.’

He grasped immediately what football could mean to the community, particularly when he arrived in Edinburgh four decades ago.

‘I was heavily influenced by my Scottish grandfather. He seemed to embody what I would say was part of the Scottish character,’ he says. Archibald Stirling Kennedy Anderson was a precocious scholar and a determined and relentless worker.

‘He had an astonishing thirst for self-improvement,’ says his grandson. There was also an unspoken element of giving back, being part of something larger than the individual. This sense of community is obvious in football.

‘You absolutely realise through experience what football does in a broader sense. I would say that has become more important in my life. I spent a year at university in Italy where the spectacle was amazing and, at that time, Serie A was the greatest show in the world.’

 

But the strongest revelation came when he swapped Bologna for Gorgie in 1986. ‘Yes, it was the year Hearts didn’t win the title,’ he says. But Scottish football made a deep impression beyond the angst of sporting disappointment.

‘I don’t understand why this is not acknowledged more freely in British and indeed Scottish society,’ he says. ‘But football has the power to create social linkages, generate excitement amid the humdrum of life, and, to me, is a serious force for good at a time when we need a serious force for good.

‘I know that is not the popular image of football either in the days of hooliganism or now of sportswashing. But I genuinely admire Scotland for the extent to which football really matters. It is profound. In that way, I am particularly interested in some of the smaller clubs. The contribution they make is more interesting to me than the machinations at the top of the game.’

His interest in Glasgow City is personal, but Anderson sees his involvement as educational in showing him how football can change lives. City has provided a base for hundreds of girls to pursue the game they love.

‘The interesting challenge is how you use the separate identity of Glasgow City to drive commitment, involvement, grow crowds. That’s a lot harder than if you are Celtic, Rangers or even Hearts. It stands for something very special.’

This is another reference to the cultural significance of the national game and its power to effect change.

He points out that many of the country’s clubs grew out of ‘deeply industrial communities where people are suffering nowadays’, adding that the Scottish political parties have never grasped the importance of the sport and its beneficial impact on society.

‘It may be a cheap shot but it is equivalent to the lack of thought given to the long-term future of the Scottish economy,’ he says.

Anderson, of course, has thought about football. In measured tones, he speaks of the possibility of a third force becoming stronger in Scotland, about the prospects of a European League and the unlikelihood of him investing in the game beyond his charitable gifts.

 

In a week where his latest donation to Hearts was estimated at £4m in the club’s financial statement, he is ‘broadly optimistic’ on the future of the game in Scotland. ‘I find the sheer dominance of Rangers and Celtic puzzling,’ he adds.

‘If you go through different European countries in all of their leagues, there have been serious challenges to the big two or big three. These may not end up in you winning the league but it does amount to a serious challenge and it does change the structure of the club and its aspirations.’

He points to Atalanta in Italy, AZ Alkmaar in the Netherlands and Villarreal in Spain as examples of clubs who have a strategy and follow it long-term.

‘I am not convinced the economics of all this are that much different to those that prevail here,’ he says, noting that Atalanta have brokered their success into a financial strength comparable to Roma.

Anderson is quietly scornful of the short-termism that dominates much of professional football. ‘We have to manage the narratives,’ he says. ‘Too much attention is on the manager.’

In business, he is always wary of the validity of the immediate feedback offered by the stock market, adding: ‘Football can be similar. The last match is all that matters and if it goes the wrong way then it is “sack the board, sack the manager”.

‘The more you look at the data, there is evidence that tells you that there is much more chance in all of this in the short term and most managers don’t make a difference. There are outliers, of course, but the notion that you can improve things by merely sacking the manager is just completely wrong.’

He strongly advocates a long-term strategy, while admitting that it has to withstand the noise of Monday headlines.

‘We should be able to get on a self-replicating higher level: European football, more revenue, more potential for players to be sold,’ he says of clubs outside Glasgow’s big two. ‘There has been fundamentally a failure of the other Scottish clubs going back to the Ferguson-McLean era at Aberdeen and Dundee United.’

He praises Ann Budge for lifting Hearts from the wreckage of the Vladimir Romanov era, admitting his involvement at Hearts had humble roots.

‘A large part of me coming in was that, when I had been very lucky with investing, the main stand was falling down. So that was obvious. Ann has done a fantastic job but we still have work to do.’

Is he optimistic? ‘Yes.’

 

Anderson watches rather than participates in the convulsions experienced in European football. The financial dominance of the English Premier League has created disparities that leagues in Italy and Spain, in particular, find difficult to accept. The result has been constant speculation about a European Super League. This was almost immediately torpedoed on its catastrophic announcement in 2021. It has, however, not gone away.

‘I don’t invest in football,’ he says of placing cash to make a financial reward rather than as means of philanthropy. ‘I think some investors, particularly from America, have an apotheosis that at some point there will be a Super League or at some point there is going to be a rebalancing of football.

‘The economics of it then might become better, but I do not think I necessarily would invest.

‘At some point in Scottish football, there may come a greater interest in the pan-European game, perhaps some sort of alliance with Holland, Belgium, Scandinavia. Logically, I can’t see why that is not a possibility. The Super League problem was that they didn’t address issues, particularly the meritocratic route.’

This is a reference to the ‘closed shop’ structure favoured by the big clubs.

 

Next month the European Court of Justice will have its final say on the validity of a European Super League. Andrea Agnelli, then chairman of Juventus, was an architect of the breakaway league. Anderson joined Lingotto Investment Managagement in the summer. This is an Agnelli family holding company and the Financial Times reported that Anderson will head up a $500m investment fund aimed at public and private companies.

‘I have many reservations about Juventus itself,’ says Anderson, a Bologna supporter. ‘You may remember that Bologna were relegated because of Calciopoli,’ he says of the scandal in 2006 that involved, among other issues, the corruption of referees to favour Juve.

‘I remember watching Bologna play Juventus that season and, in the last five minutes, the referee gave the most egregious decision to award a free kick from which Juventus scored. It was later proved that was the ref doing Juventus bidding.’

However, he adds: ‘I have huge admiration for how certain members of the family have carried on being serious industrialists. I am a large investor in Ferrari. People didn’t for some reason realise the astonishing nature of that business so I have got to know the family well.’

So has he ever taken the chance to raise the matter of that injustice to Bologna to a family linked so heavily with Juventus? ‘I haven’t yet,’ he says. ‘But in a couple of weeks’ time I’m going be spending some time at the Ferrari works...’

The odds are against an outburst worthy of Elon Musk. After all, Anderson prefers to make his points and his money with a quiet deliberation.

Edited by Marty-man
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Bring Back Paulo Sergio

If eople want to challenge and get closer to the old firm they'll be forever disappointed unless we start paying for better players. If we want to cause them any sort of problem we'll need to double the wage bill so we can start attracting better players

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Corstorphine Jambo

When he says he finds the old firm dominance “puzzling”, I do wonder if it’s a thinly veiled jibe at the authorities and their crooked ways?

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42 minutes ago, periodictabledancer said:

Weird then as he's disagreeing with his own  board, who not only sacked RN but his deputy too. 

Or maybe he wants us all to get behind a player who was past it when he was given a four year deal - according to many on here it was good business because he'd be a good coach after two years or so ( given he was never going to see his contract out as a player) , except he'd never been studying for his badges in the first place. Sounds like he needs to made chair and then he can implement his vision.

 

 

 

Not true.

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4 minutes ago, Corstorphine Jambo said:

When he says he finds the old firm dominance “puzzling”, I do wonder if it’s a thinly veiled jibe at the authorities and their crooked ways?


That is what I took from the longer article from the mail that was posted above . It is definitely what he is driving at imo . The Bologna / Juventus / Ferrari bit was telling 

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1971fozzy

I’m surprised by what he has said. I’m forever grateful to him but for me it’s easy

1) they have 50,000 - 60,000 supporters paying

2) they can pay players 5 times what we do at least

3) they have referees in their pockets

4) they have the SFA and SPFL in their pockets

5) they can pay for quality managers (no slight on Naismith here by the way) 

 

it’s that simple. Look at Celtics bench. A player tires and they replace him with fresh legs worth millions. 

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Berrassobad
1 hour ago, cazzyy said:

Didn't know he was a backer of Glasgow City, a wee conflict of interest there maybe?

Incorrect

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I see this as his way of saying that building a successful football club will take time. Its all about slow steady progress. Unfortunately most fans of Hearts and any club are not exactly patient. Continously finishing 3rd or 4th which are complety realistic will slowly raise income and profile. Its not what many want to hear, but unless you throw ridiculous money at transfers, there's no shortcut. I'm 43 and if Hearts qualify for European football this season, I think it'll be the first time in my life they've achieved that. There's been too many highs and lows, far too many lows really. Keep hitting targets and the budget will grow and so will our standing in football.

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1971fozzy
13 minutes ago, zeke1874 said:

I see this as his way of saying that building a successful football club will take time. Its all about slow steady progress. Unfortunately most fans of Hearts and any club are not exactly patient. Continously finishing 3rd or 4th which are complety realistic will slowly raise income and profile. Its not what many want to hear, but unless you throw ridiculous money at transfers, there's no shortcut. I'm 43 and if Hearts qualify for European football this season, I think it'll be the first time in my life they've achieved that. There's been too many highs and lows, far too many lows really. Keep hitting targets and the budget will grow and so will our standing in football.


we have qualified for European football many times in your lifetime ?

 

edit…….apologies saw your later post 👍

Edited by 1971fozzy
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Pasquale for King
2 hours ago, Luckies1874 said:

 

Very good to see him actively talking about us. It would be really interesting to hear in far more depth his views as to how he believes we can succeed and do what he appears to be saying we, and other clubs, have failed to do previously. What is his vision and therefore is Hearts something he is committed to for the medium/long term in respect to reaching these goals? He is someone who clearly should command respect given his incredible CV and achievements. Additionally we should all be hugely grateful for his gifting our club large sums from his personal wealth.

 

But the fact remains only significant investment in the playing squad is going to see us get anywhere near the Glasgow pair. Where is that coming from? After next season, for instance, the gift of the 3rd spot receiving automatic group stage European football is going to be gone - how does he expect any manager, Stevie Naismith or otherwise, to qualify through several play off rounds, with the current level of squad and get us into that season after season and thus receiving those windfalls? That simply ain't happening without speculation in the player market.  Likewise how does he anticipate us regularly selling players if we don't have better recruitment in the first place?

 

As @martoon says above I think it would be fantastic if we could have continuity, not chop and change management and a progression that sees us win more points season on season, creating a gap between us and the rest before worrying about competing with the big two but you have to have the right people in place to do that. Currently that remains the huge question. Do we? 

Good post and questions, this is the first time Ive heard him talk about football.
I don’t think he would be ridiculed, as Vlad/Cathro/Savage/Neilson were for saying we want/could challenge the duopoly. 
Whether he wants to keep funding other aspects of the club, to allow us to keep building the team/squad we still don’t know. 
The league is poor but we should really be looking to finish 3rd, after a 3rd then 4th which as someone said yesterday is a great run for us historically, unfortunately we have underperformed a lot. 
Lets hope he can use his undoubted business prowess, although a completely different entity from which hes used to, to keep us moving forward. 

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Pasquale for King
44 minutes ago, 1971fozzy said:

I’m surprised by what he has said. I’m forever grateful to him but for me it’s easy

1) they have 50,000 - 60,000 supporters paying

2) they can pay players 5 times what we do at least

3) they have referees in their pockets

4) they have the SFA and SPFL in their pockets

5) they can pay for quality managers (no slight on Naismith here by the way) 

 

it’s that simple. Look at Celtics bench. A player tires and they replace him with fresh legs worth millions. 

I think 3 and 4 are obvious and hopefully he can or will see that soon. 

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14 minutes ago, periodictabledancer said:

How so ?

 

 

It takes years to progress through all the "badges", SN is well on his way to completing them all. Only his A licence to go and he was well on course to doing this on schedule before the Hearts job came up, pretty sure he thought he still had a couple of years before he got to this stage. Not really his fault.

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DalryJambo
2 hours ago, periodictabledancer said:

He's saying what the fans are saying. So if it's not happening and changing managers isn't the answer, what is ?

 

Slow, incremental improvement in every aspect of the club and.....time.

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