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Scottish slang (and it’s spelling)


Morgan
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1 hour ago, Morgan said:

 

Pockle.

 

 

No, as in stealing.

 

I've heard it used for both stealing and cheating at cairds. 

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13 hours ago, AW1 said:

Gadjy or Gadgey 

 

A traveller/gypsy word hijacked by Edinburgh folk to describe a ned type. 

 

One of my  best mates nickname is gadj, we all call him it, he accepts it now. 

 

It's also used in the North East of England. 

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4 hours ago, martoon said:

 

It's also used in the North East of England. 

It is indeed. So is calling someone a "radge". Heard a few Geordies use that term 

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36 minutes ago, AW1 said:

It is indeed. So is calling someone a "radge". Heard a few Geordies use that term 

 

Heid is another. Probably a lot more.

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Used slang all my life, virtually every word already mentioned, but I have lost my way with how the young Edinburgher speaks. Often overheard them chatting on the bus, for example, and been genuinely unsure if they're locals or perhaps speaking Polish. Much of the time I never do find out.

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1 minute ago, Morgan said:

Some folk spell heid as heed.

 

:facepalm:

 

Aye, I've noticed that. Especially on dotnut. :)

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14 minutes ago, martoon said:

 

Aye, I've noticed that. Especially on dotnut. :)

Indeed, that’s because they are erseholes.

 

:biggrin:

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  • 2 years later...
On 15/10/2019 at 14:41, PortyJambo said:

Bawkit, or maybe baukit, not sure of the spelling. As in "getting bawkit on the couch"

Bawkit means lazy or I suppose it could also mean comfy but it has been used toward me to mean lazy many a time haha, as in “get oot yer bawkit bed”, “whit ye dain lyin aboot bawkit et four in the afternoon ya manky tramp”,

”get a joab and stop being bawkit on the couch” 

also I’m a bawkit musician so these things have been said to me many many times. 
now I don’t even know what it means, seems it can be used in many ways much like most of our lovely dialect. Catch yees good *****, glad I came oor this haha! 

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9 hours ago, Craig Scott said:

 “whit ye dain lyin aboot bawkit et four in the afternoon ya manky tramp”,

 


surely this would be ‘efternin’?

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On 15/10/2019 at 17:57, Morgan said:

 

Pockle.

 

 

No, as in stealing.

I would say pochle. And while it is used for stealing when I was a youngster the old trawler men my grandad has been a shipmate of used to pop into my grannies and give her some of their pochle from the catch. So not really stealing but all the guys on the crew would get a wee freebie to take up the hill (from Granton harbour) with them. Normally prime stuff that the fishmongers didn’t always sell. So halibut, monkfish, or if you were lucky John Dory. 

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4 minutes ago, Tazio said:

I would say pochle. And while it is used for stealing when I was a youngster the old trawler men my grandad has been a shipmate of used to pop into my grannies and give her some of their pochle from the catch. So not really stealing but all the guys on the crew would get a wee freebie to take up the hill (from Granton harbour) with them. Normally prime stuff that the fishmongers didn’t always sell. So halibut, monkfish, or if you were lucky John Dory. 

Yes pockle is def stealing . I think I iy tends to be from your workplace as in “ pockling” some of  the till takings 

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7 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

Yes pockle is def stealing . I think I iy tends to be from your workplace as in “ pockling” some of  the till takings 

Indeed but my thing was that with the trawler men it was almost a formal thing. No man left the boat without some fish wrapped in newspaper. Including the skipper. 

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11 minutes ago, Tazio said:

Indeed but my thing was that with the trawler men it was almost a formal thing. No man left the boat without some fish wrapped in newspaper. Including the skipper. 

👍👍

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John Gentleman
On 05/10/2019 at 03:49, Craig Gordons Gloves said:

When i worked on a farm nr West Linton and in the slaughterhouse in Biggar, towards the end of the day the farmer and some of the guys would say "time to get red up" as in, time to tidy up around you etc.  Never ever heard it anywhere else.  Am i alone in this?

My mother used it all the time, as in "Gie the hoose a guid redd oot" (give the house a thorough cleanup). She was from Bo'ness, but that wasn't her fault.
Perhaps it derived from a hen salmon's 'excavating' tail action in creating a redd (nest) to lay her eggs in? The cognate in Scandinavian languages is "rede", so the word is probably of Norse origin.

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2 hours ago, JamesM48 said:

Yes pockle is def stealing . I think I iy tends to be from your workplace as in “ pockling” some of  the till takings 

Pockle is cheating at cairds anaw.

Edited by ri Alban
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3 minutes ago, Tazio said:

Never heard that in my puff. Must be a west coast thing. 

Pulling cairds out you pocket. Cheating *******s.

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