Jump to content

Scottish slang (and it’s spelling)


Morgan
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, superjack said:

As in cowp ower. 

Yes. After I typed it I realised the word 'tip' could be used for both a mess and for something falling.

 

 

Fousty, or is it foosty, for something mouldy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 179
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Morgan

    27

  • Meathook

    14

  • ri Alban

    27

  • FruitJuice

    17

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

8 hours ago, bobsharp said:

Are there still keelies in Edinburgh

 

 

This is a word my dad used an awful lot, I think to denote people who might nowadays be described as neds. That direction, anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

Yes. After I typed it I realised the word 'tip' could be used for both a mess and for something falling.

 

 

Fousty, or is it foosty, for something mouldy?

I forgot about the wonderful foosty.  Not heard that in years.  Ya foòsty bassa!  No you lemongrab 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, FruitJuice said:

I forgot about the wonderful foosty.  Not heard that in years.  Ya foòsty bassa!  No you lemongrab 

For a minute there I thought you knew me. :D 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

For a minute there I thought you knew me. :D 

😁 I was referring to myself. I should've said I've not been called that in years...

Treg!  Again not you,  but I can remember that being used to describe someone trampy.  Not sure if that was just our scheme or a wider known word.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a Scottish word but at school and someone had stood on dog shite or something, you would put your bees/b's up.  I know in some places then said keys up  though that might be a west coast thing.  

'You alright hen, you won't get pregnant, I've got my bees up.  

Edited by FruitJuice
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Boy Named Crow
9 hours ago, ri Alban said:

Clattie for me, never say clarty.

 

 

100% this!

 

I’ve long held the theory that the Edinburgh spelling / pronunciation comes from a historic use of the Anglicised “a” sounds,  like how the English would say glahss instead of glass. If you use the English a from glass in clatty, you get pretty close to clarty, eh?

 

I have no evidence for this, other than it fits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

luckyBatistuta
12 hours ago, Morgan said:

Eggie language!  :lol: 

 

Where you put the letters ‘eg’ after every vowel?  That one?

 

Not a lost art to me.

 

You need to brush up on your eggie my man. It’s an egg before every vowel.

 

10 hours ago, FruitJuice said:

Fegguck eggoff.  Is there anyone still fluent in eggy language?

 

My missus and her sister can rattle it off easily. They don’t even have any pauses.

 

 

 

 

boaby

tadger

gonads

chebs

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, FruitJuice said:

It's only clatty if your from the west and you can't pronounce things properly.  It's clarty.  It comes from claret.  You from the west? 

Yes. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, A Boy Named Crow said:

 

100% this!

 

I’ve long held the theory that the Edinburgh spelling / pronunciation comes from a historic use of the Anglicised “a” sounds,  like how the English would say glahss instead of glass. If you use the English a from glass in clatty, you get pretty close to clarty, eh?

 

I have no evidence for this, other than it fits.

I posted this earlier  the right one is clarty. It's supposedly from claret.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, ri Alban said:

Drunk or volley?

Both. It's strange how other words for hitting hard, like smashed and hammered, also mean drunk. Maybe it isn't. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

Both. It's strange how other words for hitting hard, like smashed and hammered, also mean drunk. Maybe it isn't. 

I suppose Michael McIntyre has a point. You can use any word for Drunk or Hit. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Boy Named Crow
3 hours ago, FruitJuice said:

I posted this earlier  the right one is clarty. It's supposedly from claret.  

 

Really, how would that come about though, likening something that is foul or dirty to a fairly nice tipple?

If you can back it up, I’m happy to accept this, but if not, I’ll continue using my baseless assertion  and discard yours 😉

Edited by A Boy Named Crow
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, A Boy Named Crow said:

 

Really, how would that come about though, likening something that is foul or dirty to a fairly nice tipple?

If you can back it up, I’m happy to accept this, but if not, I’ll continue using my baseless assertion  and discard yours 😉

Think Motherwell and you'll get there...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

You need to brush up on your eggie my man. It’s an egg before every vowel.

 

 

My missus and her sister can rattle it off easily. They don’t even have any pauses.

 

 

 

 

boaby

tadger

gonads

chebs

 

 

 

I corrected myself later on yesterday.  Couldn’t believe I’d got it the wrong way round.  :facepalm:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
N Lincs Jambo

Anyone still use the word dippit? As in ya dippit *****? Interesting for me was that in the 80s I spent a year in Vienna and their slang word deppert (pronouced teppit) means exactly the same as dippit in Edinburgh slang.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, wentworth jambo said:

Reading this thread has left me puggled !!!

 

Just puggled?

 

Or, puggled pink?

 

:biggrin:

 

21 minutes ago, N Lincs Jambo said:

Anyone still use the word dippit? As in ya dippit *****? Interesting for me was that in the 80s I spent a year in Vienna and their slang word deppert (pronouced teppit) means exactly the same as dippit in Edinburgh slang.

 

I still say dippit to this very day.  :thumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 05/10/2019 at 02:19, Lemongrab said:

Yes. After I typed it I realised the word 'tip' could be used for both a mess and for something falling.

 

 

Fousty, or is it foosty, for something mouldy?

Is it not spelt ‘fusty’?

 

Funnily enough, we were talking about this yesterday and had a difference of opinion regarding it’s spelling.

 

I say fusty, my wife says foosty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Is it not spelt ‘fusty’?

 

Funnily enough, we were talking about this yesterday and had a difference of opinion regarding it’s spelling.

 

I say fusty, my wife says foosty.

 

Fusty mibbe be the English version? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Horatio Caine
1 hour ago, Morgan said:

Is it not spelt ‘fusty’?

 

Funnily enough, we were talking about this yesterday and had a difference of opinion regarding it’s spelling.

 

I say fusty, my wife says foosty.

You say fusty, I say foosty - fusty, foosty, let's call the whole think off

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Horatio Caine said:

You say fusty, I say foosty - fusty, foosty, let's call the whole think off

:D That did come intae ma heid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 04/10/2019 at 19:19, Craig Gordons Gloves said:

When i worked on a farm nr West Linton and in the slaughterhouse in Biggar, towards the end of the day the farmer and some of the guys would say "time to get red up" as in, time to tidy up around you etc.  Never ever heard it anywhere else.  Am i alone in this?

 

My auld fedder used to look for a 'redder' so he could 'redd' his hair (when he had some). 

 

Essentially it just means to tidy as in 'Da Voar Redd Up' - a community (Shetland) spring clean of beaches, verges, ditches etc every spring (voar). 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Thommo414 said:

Clipe. Infinitely better than the modern "grass" imo

Just a plain old ‘Lee Wallace’ would suffice, imo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

 

Fusty mibbe be the English version? 

Could be.

 

It came up due to the fact that my wife is currently reading a book that is set in America.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, PortyJambo said:

Bawkit, or maybe baukit, not sure of the spelling. As in "getting bawkit on the couch"

Don’t know that one.  

 

Does it mean comfy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Don’t know that one.  

 

Does it mean comfy?

 

Yeah, don't even know where I first heard/used it!

 

Edit - googled it (as thinking I'd maybe just made it up!), and it does come up as scots slang, there's even a Facebook page called "Bawkit on the couch" :lol:

Edited by PortyJambo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, PortyJambo said:

Bawkit, or maybe baukit, not sure of the spelling. As in "getting bawkit on the couch"

Bawkicked Mair like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gadjy or Gadgey 

 

A traveller/gypsy word hijacked by Edinburgh folk to describe a ned type. 

 

One of my  best mates nickname is gadj, we all call him it, he accepts it now. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 04/10/2019 at 19:19, Craig Gordons Gloves said:

When i worked on a farm nr West Linton and in the slaughterhouse in Biggar, towards the end of the day the farmer and some of the guys would say "time to get red up" as in, time to tidy up around you etc.  Never ever heard it anywhere else.  Am i alone in this?

 

Perhaps related linguistically in some way to Shetland's annual Reddup litter clean?

 

https://www.shetlandamenity.org/da-voar-redd-up

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Lemongrab said:

Pockle or is it pochle?

 

Pockle.

 

1 hour ago, ri Alban said:

As in cheating at cairds?

 

No, as in stealing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, AW1 said:

Gadjy or Gadgey 

 

A traveller/gypsy word hijacked by Edinburgh folk to describe a ned type. 

 

One of my  best mates nickname is gadj, we all call him it, he accepts it now. 

Gadgie.

 

My father-in-law spelt it Gadgy.

Edited by Morgan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share




×
×
  • Create New...