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Scottish slang (and it’s spelling)


Morgan
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1 hour ago, Tazio said:

Never been sure of the spelling of choarie, as in, the act of borrowing something permanently. 

 

Chored. As in "That shan **** chored ma piece."

 

 

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Words I'd never heard before moving to Edinburgh:

Gadgie

Barrie

Chore

Radge

Shan

 

The Gypsies certainly made their mark.  Years ago an old guy I knew in Leith called his flat what sounded like his 'care'. I've never heard anyone else use that, but just now discovered the Gypsy word for a home is 'keir'. It only took me 33 years to find out what the boy old was on about.

 

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been here before

Im not sure if its soley an Edinburgh expression or not as the eeegies tend to claim everything as lart of 'the patter', but years back I lived in London and once mentioned to the lassie I lived with that Id "chum her for the messages". Utter bewilderment on her part.

 

I forgot myself one weekend and went the the local newsagent and asked for a Pink. Much merriment and insinuations followed until it clicked I wasnt in Edinburgh.

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Craig Gordons Gloves

When i worked on a farm nr West Linton and in the slaughterhouse in Biggar, towards the end of the day the farmer and some of the guys would say "time to get red up" as in, time to tidy up around you etc.  Never ever heard it anywhere else.  Am i alone in this?

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3 hours ago, been here before said:

The correct spelling is choob.

 

The incorrect spelling is tube.

 

Aye? I though a 'tube/choob' was a sook.  So tube rather than choob  what did you think a choob/tube

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Governor Tarkin
12 minutes ago, Craig Gordons Gloves said:

When i worked on a farm nr West Linton and in the slaughterhouse in Biggar, towards the end of the day the farmer and some of the guys would say "time to get red up" as in, time to tidy up around you etc.  Never ever heard it anywhere else.  Am i alone in this?

 

Nope, used to hear it all the time when I was a stonemason working with guys from East Lothian.

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2 hours ago, ri Alban said:

Clattie for me, never say clarty.

 

It's only clatty if your from the west and you can't pronounce things properly.  It's clarty.  It comes from claret.  You from the west? 

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2 hours ago, Sirudi said:

My favourite childhood word has always been Maulicate.

As in, I am going to maulicate you ya wee radge.

 

A close second is Yoker, which referred to a brick or stone.

As in, that wee radge threw a yoker at me.

 

Did anyone else ever speak in “eggie” language ??

A long lost art I fear.

Fegguck eggoff.  Is there anyone still fluent in eggy language?

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36 minutes ago, Craig Gordons Gloves said:

When i worked on a farm nr West Linton and in the slaughterhouse in Biggar, towards the end of the day the farmer and some of the guys would say "time to get red up" as in, time to tidy up around you etc.  Never ever heard it anywhere else.  Am i alone in this?

 

My Mrs and her family all say red up, from Dunbar.

 

Edit: As stated by GT above.

Edited by graygo
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26 minutes ago, FruitJuice said:

Fegguck eggoff.  Is there anyone still fluent in eggy language?

 

Yip, speak it daily with the wife :lol:

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17 minutes ago, hmfc_liam06 said:

 

Yip, speak it daily with the wife :lol:

What's it like when she talks dirty to you using it..?

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scott herbertson
2 hours ago, ArcticJambo said:

 

In the Edinburgh History thread someone posted a picture, this one ...609450311_Grassmarket1904-GrassmarketMissionBairnsOutinglaterknowasTheBarriesafterAlexBarrieappointSuperin1916henceBarrieTrips.jpg.2e880ae23d1f42e76a092608e0b5c33c.jpg

 

Not sure if it was captioned with the following info or if I sourced the info from elsewhere:

Grassmarket 1904 - Grassmarket Mission Bairns Outing later know as The Barries after Alex Barrie appointed Super in 1916. (outings to beach at Porty/down coast)

 

I'd like to think that perhaps it influenced the use of the word Barrie. Is Barrie a purely Edinburgh word I wonder?

 

 

Nice to think that but I think it's just another Romany word:

 

"Editor of Scottish Dictionaries online, Pauline Cairns Speitel, gave a number of examples of modern day slang that originated from Romani.

She writes that the word "munter" (slang for an unattractive person) is a development from a Gypsy word "munt", meaning to weep.

Adding that "Barry" (slang used to describe something very good of its type) has also been borrowed from the Romani word "barri", which also means "big or great"."

 

I'm sure  that those who went on the Barrie trips thought they were barry though.....!

 

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4 hours ago, Morgan said:

I’ve always thought it was ‘chorie’

 

Which, after you’d choried something you would have to ‘nash’ or ‘stoorie’.

And of course, there'd be someone keeping shottie

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14 minutes ago, Boris said:

 

:spoton:

Any idea why shottie?  We used it when we were young but never got the logic to it.  I've never worked out if it was short for something. 

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5 minutes ago, FruitJuice said:

Any idea why shottie?  We used it when we were young but never got the logic to it.  I've never worked out if it was short for something. 

Ah I see I was beaten to it!

 

It's got the Romani ring to it too but I'd be interested to hear more. 

Having spent a decade in Holland I've long been interested in the links between Scots and Dutch, our Kirk is their kerk, our stane dyke is their steen dijk which is pronounced exactly the same, they even use ken like we do.

 

Fascinating language, Scots.

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2 hours ago, Big Slim Stylee said:

 

How’s that English Lit degree going for you?

Fantastic as it happens, now jog on 👍

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16 minutes ago, Smithee said:

Ah I see I was beaten to it!

 

It's got the Romani ring to it too but I'd be interested to hear more. 

Having spent a decade in Holland I've long been interested in the links between Scots and Dutch, our Kirk is their kerk, our stane dyke is their steen dijk which is pronounced exactly the same, they even use ken like we do.

 

Fascinating language, Scots.

It is a fascinating language but when ever I see poetry in Scots I haven't heard about 80% of the words used.  I think most words used in Scots are used regionally rather than everywhere. 

Not making a political point here but I think this is interesting. 

The poet Tom Leonard's famous poem 'the news' is/was used in the English school curriculum.  It's categorised under 'poems from other cultures'.  I wonder if a poem written in a Yorkshire dialect would it be classified from a different culture.  

Edited by FruitJuice
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31 minutes ago, Smithee said:

Ah I see I was beaten to it!

 

It's got the Romani ring to it too but I'd be interested to hear more. 

Having spent a decade in Holland I've long been interested in the links between Scots and Dutch, our Kirk is their kerk, our stane dyke is their steen dijk which is pronounced exactly the same, they even use ken like we do.

 

Fascinating language, Scots.

Is Dutch for 'brown cow' not something that sounds like 'broon coo'?

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1 minute ago, Lemongrab said:

Is Dutch for 'brown cow' not something that sounds like 'broon coo'?

Nearly, bruin is brown, but it's pronounced the same as ours (ui = "ow")

 

Koe means cow though, and that is indeed pronounced coo

 

 

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3 hours ago, Mauricio Pinilla said:

 

Heard bampot a lot but not bamstick. 

 

Shitebag is one of the top insults. Hear it a lot at tynecastle these days. 

Bamstick would have been before your time, M.

 

@ri Alban is spot on though.

 

It was usually the ‘keelies’ that said it, mind.  :lol:

 

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5 hours ago, graygo said:

 

Never heard of erky or erkie, always erchie for me. Dinnae want tae start a stooshie over it though.

 

Edit: The Pans fellae used the stooshie word before me so I'll change mine to "pagger".

A stooshie sometimes ends in a pagger though 👍

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Anyone said “Gantin” as in disgusting. 

 

Had a kebab and it was “gantin”. 

 

Those shoes are gantin. 

 

“Loupin” pronounced Lowe-pin same meaning. 

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4 minutes ago, Pans Jambo said:

Anyone said “Gantin” as in disgusting. 

 

Had a kebab and it was “gantin”. 

 

Those shoes are gantin. 

 

“Loupin” pronounced Lowe-pin same meaning. 

Gantin, Loupin, Minging are all good.

 

How about ‘Boufin’ or ‘Hingin’?

 

:) 

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6 minutes ago, Pans Jambo said:

Anyone said “Gantin” as in disgusting. 

 

Had a kebab and it was “gantin”. 

 

Those shoes are gantin. 

 

“Loupin” pronounced Lowe-pin same meaning. 

 

Like eskimos with snow, we have a lot of words for disgusting 

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3 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Gantin, Loupin, Minging are all good.

 

How about ‘Boufin’ or ‘Hingin’?

 

:) 

I'd just typed bowfin. 

 

Add boggin to the list. 

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1 minute ago, Lemongrab said:

I'd just typed bowfin. 

 

Add boggin to the list. 

Cool.

 

Boggin and ‘bum flingin’.

 

 

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Aye Morgan. My mate who was an auld nail anaw would keep shotties on the chorrie. 

Ifin he shouted nash the stoorie was on. 

Hes deid and I miss the radge. 

 

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4 hours ago, Ray Gin said:

Some 'barrie' Edinburgh words:

Clype

Dingied

Dreich

Gadgie

Glaikit

Mawkit

Radge

Scunnered

Scran

Shan

Skelped

Tidy

 

I told my current bird she had a tidy ***** when I first pulled her knickers off.

 

She loved that.

 

Tidy is a Barry expression.

 

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28 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Gantin, Loupin, Minging are all good.

 

How about ‘Boufin’ or ‘Hingin’?

 

:) 

Like boufin

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Just now, FruitJuice said:

Boufin is a better wied than Minging.

Is cowp only used in Scotland?

Cowp as is “yer bedrooms a cowp”?

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1 minute ago, Pans Jambo said:

Cowp as is “yer bedrooms a cowp”?

Aye! 

I know a lot of people in England say that their fav Scottish word is Minging but I think boufin is a lot better.  

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3 hours ago, FruitJuice said:

Any idea why shottie?  We used it when we were young but never got the logic to it.  I've never worked out if it was short for something. 

 

I thought it was short for shotgun, like in the cowboy films when the guy sat next to the boy driving the stagecoach with a gun. "Riding shotgun" He was the lookout for everyone else.

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13 minutes ago, graygo said:

 

I thought it was short for shotgun, like in the cowboy films when the guy sat next to the boy driving the stagecoach with a gun. "Riding shotgun" He was the lookout for everyone else.

I think you've cracked it.  Brilliant thanks.

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