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Local Colloquialisms


Alex Kintner

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“ keeping a showtae “ no sure of speeding ( keeping any eye on something or someone ) 

 

cheggied ( stole ) 

 

starday ( jail ) 

 

 

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  • Auldbenches

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6 minutes ago, redtipsjambo said:

What about hunted,  as in that guy needs hunted(chased away)

said that to some edinburgh folk and they had never heard of it.

I'm the same with sibees, always called them that,  although I've seen cyboes as well

Yah, cybies ( no clue on spelling). My mum & her family used thso word all the time (spring onions , for the ignorant).

 

Re the stovies question elsewhere - made on a Monday with the leftover Sunday roast (lamb or beef) but NEVER corned beef . Superb stuff. 

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2 minutes ago, milky_26 said:

you've gone and done it now. the fighting on the covid thread will pale into insignificance with the rammy that will happen with everyone telling each other what is the correct way of making stovies

😂😂

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2 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

😂😂

jimmy you know i'm right and there is probably only one other non football topic that would be worse than the stovie one. i wont mention it as i dont want blamed for jkb armaggeddon

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6 minutes ago, milky_26 said:

jimmy you know i'm right and there is probably only one other non football topic that would be worse than the stovie one. i wont mention it as i dont want blamed for jkb armaggeddon

Ok I agree !😂😂3203A92A-A818-4EF7-B26D-DC3D2C3EE0FB.jpeg.ad19237c76b7d529d43427557d7c49e0.jpeg

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Auldbenches
2 hours ago, JamesM48 said:

Yes the parenting styles nowadays are so different from years ago . Some rally positive aspects to it but children are far too risk adverse now compared to our childhood . I remember walking to school when I was 6 . Now it seems kids are chauffeur driven until they get to high school . It’s an over molly coddling of children which creates dependency and Makes children less able and resilient in later life I feel . It’s damaging . 
 

I didn’t really get too many “ bag offs “ at the school disco really ! Would gave caused a scandal if I had . I also recall the term “ nashing “ 

 

Bag off where I grew up but heard gillie folk using bag oot. 

Maybe the lassies there were uglier. 

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15 hours ago, Lone Striker said:

The re-pronounciation of some words has always fascinated me. Changing the vowel sounds mainly. 

 

 Not sure if these are mainly an Edinburgh thing or not - Lowland Scots derivation probably

 

Gress = grass

Fower  = 4

Seeven = 7

Troot = trout

Maister= master

Ither = other

 

Then there's words with a Germanic or French derivation in the pronounciation-

 

Richt = right

Kirk = church

 

 

Another word  Dad used was Slaister .... as in "yer a right slaister"    (I think it meant messy)

 

 

 

 

  

I still get called that ! 😄

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44 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

Yea as other person commented there was a stoavies thread ! And it’s tatties and corned beef 🥩 😎

 

 

 

Wrong. 

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Auldbenches
47 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

Yea as other person commented there was a stoavies thread ! And it’s tatties and corned beef 🥩 😎

You just can't help yourself...

Who the feck in skint hooses had left over corned beef?  

 

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3 hours ago, JamesM48 said:

My English friend was in hysterics with this phrase when he first came up to Scotland . I think it stems from actually writing a shopping list down on paper as in “ messages l really 

 

As I've said a few times we have a bunch of links with Dutch, especially in the east of Scotland.

 

The Dutch for a message is boodschap, and their word for groceries is also the plural, boodschappen

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My gorebridge granny always used to say the dogs were ben the hoose if they were in another room.

I loved it, when I bought a house in Holland I called it Ben the Hoose.

 

My fife granny always said "yer lik a coo lookin ooer a dyke"

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3 hours ago, martoon said:

 

Heard that in darts, too, I think.

 

Your opponent checking out before you've checked in.

 

Embarrassing.

The 'pool' one's happened to me quite a few times.😔

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n, pl syboes or sybows
(Cookery) Scot a spring onion
[C16: from cibol, from French ciboule, from Latin cepulla onion bed, from cepa onion]
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38 minutes ago, Auldbenches said:

You just can't help yourself...

Who the feck in skint hooses had left over corned beef?  

 

Just having a coffee with a friend . He says it’s definitely sausages ! 

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14 minutes ago, bairdy said:

The 'pool' one's happened to me quite a few times.😔

 

Almost happened to me in a darts leg at the Right Wing. A game v. some Hibby. 

 

Still lost but by the time he finally checked out I was on for one myself with the next three. 

 

Grannied by a Hibby?

 

What a thought.

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Auldbenches
27 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

Just having a coffee with a friend . He says it’s definitely sausages ! 

I'm amazed that you stil have working class friends.

Edited by Auldbenches
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Auldbenches
37 minutes ago, bairdy said:

What about 'cadge.'

ie 'I cadged a fag of my mate.'

I wonder if that's another romany word we adopted like radge?   

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Puddock's paws is another granny one, if your hands were cold, they were like puddock's paws, frog's feet. She would talk about hoolits (owls) and cooshy doos (woodpigeons) but I suppose that's more Scots language than colloquialism

 

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46 minutes ago, Auldbenches said:

I'm amazed that you stil have working class friends.

Bless them , they keep me grounded and remind me of my humble roots 😎ps how you know he’s a working class Gorgie boy 👦 

146DEC37-0C06-4E53-B3BA-925C1FA56089.gif

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18 minutes ago, Rupert Pupkin said:

 Joogal.... A Dog 

 Dunno why..

 

Haha. That brings back memories. Had a pal called Addie years ago and he had an Alsatian who was bonkers. Another friend would always say ‘here comes Addie wi’ that daft ****ing joogal’. 

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1 hour ago, GinRummy said:

Remember hearing older folk calling a drain a gundy. Not in Edinburgh but through west. 

A weedgie mate calls it stank.

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Wonfiveone
2 hours ago, GinRummy said:

Remember hearing older folk calling a drain a gundy. Not in Edinburgh but through west. 

A siver is what we called a street drain when I was young.

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Just now, Wonfiveone said:

A siver is what we called a street drain when I was young.

Heard that one as well 👍

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5 minutes ago, Wonfiveone said:

A siver is what we called a street drain when I was young.

:thumbsup:

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Wonfiveone
8 hours ago, Tazio said:

Other odd shopping things. A loaf of bread always called a half loaf, and my mum and the older generation still talk about going to the shop for butcher’s meat. As in “I need to remember to get the butcher’s meat when I’m at he Provie” 

I used to get sent to the store for a fourpit of tatties. If I remember correctly the shop keeper used to put 3 and a half pound weights on one side of the scales and put in the tatties until the scale sides balanced.

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21 hours ago, Auldbenches said:

I wonder if it was used further than the lothians. 

Asked about clatty and clarty because I also wonder where things become more west Scotland 

Cat dies and variations of it were/are used UK wide.

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Wonfiveone

A couple or so of words from my childhood that appear to have different meanings nowadays:

mingin meant smelly

scaffy meant a street sweeper

cried meant called (named)

 

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Paddy Crossan
2 hours ago, GinRummy said:

Remember hearing older folk calling a drain a gundy. Not in Edinburgh but through west. 

It was called a gundy when I lived in Tranent

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Just now, Paddy Crossan said:

It was called a gundy when I lived in Tranent

Thought it was a west of Scotland thing 👍

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53 minutes ago, Wonfiveone said:

A siver is what we called a street drain when I was young.

It's what I still call them. 

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Wonfiveone

A few more words from my youth.

 

patron or partan = large crab

puddly = small fish

rone = roof gutter

Bucket raking = a past time of a couple of families where I was brought up searching the buckets of the more affluent areas

rubbers = gym shoes

Tumshay = turnip

yocker = large stone for throwing

mockit= dirty

scud=nude

pee the bed= dandelion

Claise = clothes

oxters = armpits

piece = sandwich

 

 

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Auldbenches
1 hour ago, IronJambo said:

Cat dies and variations of it were/are used UK wide.

Thought it was just a local thing.  Curious to know where it came from...

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22 minutes ago, Auldbenches said:

Thought it was just a local thing.  Curious to know where it came from...

 

What I was told is that when your cat dies you wear your trousers at half mast in its memory.

 

Seems to be the case.

https://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/has-your-cat-died-voted-most-incomprehensible-insult-of-all-time-20190126181827

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Auldbenches
2 minutes ago, Beni said:

 

What I was told is that when your cat dies you wear your trousers at half mast in its memory.

Thanks. 

Only one trouser leg if your pet goat dies? 

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12 hours ago, Herbert said:

 

 

I never heard "the street" in Edinburgh It was and still is the toon, Its only when I've lived in small towns I've heard people saying they're going doon the street.

I was brought up in a small town, that's where I heard it.  I suppose those places might have had main street where most of the shops were. 

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Alex Kintner

Gutties, rubbers and plimsoles.

 

Playing “Join the crew” and going home black and blue, especially when you were one of the youngest.

Edited by Alex Kintner
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Cowp - To tip over.

Nyaff - A wee annoying person.

Sheugh - A ditch or the crack of your arse.

 

Pagger, another Romany word, is one I've only heard in Edinburgh.

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