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Local Colloquialisms


Alex Kintner

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35 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

My English friend was in hysterics with this phrase when he first came up to Scotland . I think it stems from actually writing a shopping list down on paper as in “ messages l really 

 

Probably originated before general stores or supermarkets so when being sent for the messages you would have a separate note/list for each shop rather than nowadays where you can just have 1 shopping list and just go to asda etc

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13 minutes ago, martoon said:

 

I was the same as a kid. 

 

Long summer nights and I was allowed out until it got dark. Sometimes it never truly did get dark.

 

Those times would never end, I believed. 😊

 

Feel sorry for kids now. Don't think many will have the freedom I did in the 70s and early 80s.

Double posting. 

Edited by JamesM48
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Other odd shopping things. A loaf of bread always called a half loaf, and my mum and the older generation still talk about going to the shop for butcher’s meat. As in “I need to remember to get the butcher’s meat when I’m at he Provie” 

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27 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

We just called the kitchen the scullery. 😂 yes happy summer memories of playing kick the can until 10 Pm and heading home knackered and usually 

“ Mocket “ 

 

Scullery was wherever you done the washing up/washed clothes, so could be a separate wee room or in the kitchen itself 

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1 minute ago, Tazio said:

Other odd shopping things. A loaf of bread always called a half loaf, and my mum and the older generation still talk about going to the shop for butcher’s meat. As in “I need to remember to get the butcher’s meat when I’m at he Provie” 

I still go and get “ the butchers meat “ ! Come on it had to be said 😂😂😂

48547F33-FA80-451C-8BAD-8BE6F4F0634A.gif

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Auldbenches
37 minutes ago, martoon said:

There was a game we played that, when caught, you were placed in an imaginary cell/holding place until an ally "tigged" you out, as it were.

 

The game had a strange name that I don't think I ever truly knew or understood.

Leave lo.  Don't know the spelling. 

Snow dropping.  That might've been used out with Edinburgh. 

Ding dong dash  is excellent  

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In Whitburn we used to call a piece oan jam 'Carluke Steak' 

 

There's some Carluke steak ben the scullery oan the bunker.

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A classy sentence using local sayings that reference place names. 

“she telt me I had to get off at Haymarket, mind you that took ages as it was like chucking a sausage up Blair Street” 

 

That one should confuse non Edinburgh people. 

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I only discovered recently that saying you’re “ages with someone” isn’t something English people understand. 

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21 minutes ago, Tazio said:

A classy sentence using local sayings that reference place names. 

“she telt me I had to get off at Haymarket, mind you that took ages as it was like chucking a sausage up Blair Street” 

 

That one should confuse non Edinburgh people. 

that took me a moment to work out and it was the second bit that helped me understand

13 minutes ago, Tazio said:

I only discovered recently that saying you’re “ages with someone” isn’t something English people understand. 

philistines

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23 minutes ago, Auldbenches said:

Leave lo.  Don't know the spelling. 

Snow dropping.  That might've been used out with Edinburgh. 

Ding dong dash is excellent  

 

...and classy.

 

Chap door run, where I lived. Iirc. Don't remember doing it much, tbh.

 

Helpie, the levoy/leave thing and fitba mostly. I was never in.

 

Being "kept in" for misdemeanours was the harshest punishment in the world to me. 

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15 minutes ago, Tazio said:

I only discovered recently that saying you’re “ages with someone” isn’t something English people understand. 

 

Strange people, they English. 😄

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Auldbenches
Just now, martoon said:

 

...and classy.

 

Chap door run, where I lived. Iirc. Don't remember doing it much, tbh.

 

Helpie, the levoy/leave thing and fitba mostly. I was never in.

 

Being "kept in" for misdemeanours was the harshest punishment in the world to me. 

Brutal having to tell your mates that when asked if you were doing something later.  

Shapes for wallie always sounded posh to me.  Did they actually shout things like triangle before they kicked it? 

 

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Just now, martoon said:

 

Strange people, they English. 😄

Tell me about it. Imagine my confusion marrying someone from the midlands and their family saying you talk funny. 

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jambostuart

Anyone else use patch? As in to patch your work or patch the school as it's too nice a day to attend? 

 

Or to fail to meet a friend... You've patched them?

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Just now, jambostuart said:

Anyone else use patch? As in to patch your work or patch the school as it's too nice a day to attend? 

 

Or to fail to meet a friend... You've patched them?

I think that’s a more recent thing. Dingie would have been the word for my generation for that. 

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7 minutes ago, Tazio said:

Tell me about it. Imagine my confusion marrying someone from the midlands and their family saying you talk funny. 

 

😄

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Auldbenches

Pickle etc are supposed to originate from romany culture.  Always wondered why they we used adopted them but other places in Scotland.

I hear folk say gowf and I can't remember anyone using that.  Was that more of a fife and perthshire thing?  

 

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Auldbenches
4 minutes ago, Tazio said:

I think that’s a more recent thing. Dingie would have been the word for my generation for that. 

Brummies call a granny getting brushed.   As in grannied at pool.  

 

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2 minutes ago, Auldbenches said:

Brummies call a granny getting brushed.   As in grannied at pool.  

 

 

Heard that in darts, too, I think.

 

Your opponent checking out before you've checked in.

 

Embarrassing.

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11 minutes ago, jambostuart said:

Anyone else use patch? As in to patch your work or patch the school as it's too nice a day to attend? 

 

Or to fail to meet a friend... You've patched them?

Patched is definitely more recent . We used to call it “ getting bumped “ 

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CostaJambo
1 hour ago, JamesM48 said:

Yes same here in feeling sorry for kids now who never seem to leave their bedrooms or are in their phones or tablets . They are really missing out on those great shared experiences with friends . Suppose it’s just how things evolve . And yes the summers did seem warmer and lighter until 11 at night . I was always out  enjoying myself . I thank my parents for not having a helicopter parenting style ! Made me quite an independent and resourceful child and adult . 

Couldn't agree more, quite sad really. I bet there are kids in their late teens these days who have never climbed a tree in their puff (does puff count?). We used to do it for no other reason than it was there!

 

Also unsure about two sayings we used for scoring at a school disco - you either got "fixed up" or got a "bag off" those were the days!

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3 minutes ago, CostaJambo said:

Couldn't agree more, quite sad really. I bet there are kids in their late teens these days who have never climbed a tree in their puff (does puff count?). We used to do it for no other reason than it was there!

 

Also unsure about two sayings we used for scoring at a school disco - you either got "fixed up" or got a "bag off" those were the days!

Yes the parenting styles nowadays are so different from years ago . Some rally positive aspects to it but children are far too risk adverse now compared to our childhood . I remember walking to school when I was 6 . Now it seems kids are chauffeur driven until they get to high school . It’s an over molly coddling of children which creates dependency and Makes children less able and resilient in later life I feel . It’s damaging . 
 

I didn’t really get too many “ bag offs “ at the school disco really ! Would gave caused a scandal if I had . I also recall the term “ nashing “ 

 

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Alex Kintner
21 minutes ago, jambostuart said:

Anyone else use patch? As in to patch your work or patch the school as it's too nice a day to attend? 

 

Or to fail to meet a friend... You've patched them?


When I was young we called this dogging…which has a whole other meaning these days!

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10 minutes ago, Alex Kintner said:


When I was young we called this dogging…which has a whole other meaning these days!

And I recall we used to say “ Turn the tranny on  “ ! Now that’s completely different now 

C3ACD114-08F2-4736-9364-A46BF7E2BD49.gif

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Auldbenches
21 minutes ago, JamesM48 said:

Patched is definitely more recent . We used to call it “ getting bumped “ 

Did people not use dogging the school for skiving?  

I suppose dogging the school has a different nowadays. 

 

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Just now, Auldbenches said:

Did people not use dogging the school for skiving?  

I suppose dogging the school has a different nowadays. 

 

We said “ kipping “ school 

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Auldbenches
13 minutes ago, Alex Kintner said:


When I was young we called this dogging…which has a whole other meaning these days!

Beat me to it.  Never saw this when posting. 

Credit for ding dong dash.   Hope you made that up.   

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Auldbenches
Just now, JamesM48 said:

We said “ kipping “ school 

Kipping was the first I heard.  I remember a couple of lassies at school saying leaf piece for play piece at primary.   Never knew if it was just something they used. 

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2 hours ago, martoon said:

There was a game we played that, when caught, you were placed in an imaginary cell/holding place until an ally "tigged" you out, as it were.

 

The game had a strange name that I don't think I ever truly knew or understood.

2 man hunt?

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1 hour ago, JamesM48 said:

I still go and get “ the butchers meat “ ! Come on it had to be said 😂😂😂

48547F33-FA80-451C-8BAD-8BE6F4F0634A.gif

Enough about your private life.

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been here before
1 hour ago, Tazio said:

A classy sentence using local sayings that reference place names. 

“she telt me I had to get off at Haymarket, mind you that took ages as it was like chucking a sausage up Blair Street” 

 

That one should confuse non Edinburgh people. 

 

Now theres a coincidence.

 

In all my days Id never heard that phrase until someone at work mentioned it last week and even then they had to provide an explanation for us.

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11 minutes ago, ri Alban said:

Enough about your private life.

Oh don’t be such a delicate flower 🌺 

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Slightly off topic 

 

stoavies.

 

Growing up it was sausage, onion and tatties all boiled together with gravy.

 

Is that the right way or is corned beef hash the right way?

 

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2 minutes ago, Herbert said:

Slightly off topic 

 

stoavies.

 

Growing up it was sausage, onion and tatties all boiled together with gravy.

 

Is that the right way or is corned beef hash the right way?

 

Well this will blow the thread apart. Sausages for convenience, leftovers from Sunday dinner for "proper" stovies. 

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Lone Striker
2 hours ago, Ribble said:

 

Scullery was wherever you done the washing up/washed clothes, so could be a separate wee room or in the kitchen itself 

Thats what I always assumed it was too. But my granny & grandad had only one small kitchen in their Gorgie Road tenement and they called it a scullery.     

 

Theres a definition when you google it that suggests its derived from a French word for serving platter,  used to transport food to the table in big posh houses.  

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Lone Striker
50 minutes ago, Auldbenches said:

Sibees (sp?) for spring onions  

Yeah, I heard that one too.   Never heard them called spring onions until the 80s.  No idea how you spell it or where the word came from.    Your spelling looks  rather too close to "Hibees" for comfort though :whistling:  .... although both are green and bitter.  :gok: 

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21 minutes ago, Herbert said:

Slightly off topic 

 

stoavies.

 

Growing up it was sausage, onion and tatties all boiled together with gravy.

 

Is that the right way or is corned beef hash the right way?

 

 

There was a stovies thread a few years back, Herb. 

 

Sausages v. Corned beef

 

Brown v. White...

 

It was epic. Must have lead to quite a few warning points, suspensions and lifelong bans.

 

Religion, flag debates...pfft.

 

How you took yer stovies put all that nonsense in the shade.

 

I'm out if this thread escalates.

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36 minutes ago, Herbert said:

Slightly off topic 

 

stoavies.

 

Growing up it was sausage, onion and tatties all boiled together with gravy.

 

Is that the right way or is corned beef hash the right way?

 

Yea as other person commented there was a stoavies thread ! And it’s tatties and corned beef 🥩 😎

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Auldbenches
24 minutes ago, Lone Striker said:

Yeah, I heard that one too.   Never heard them called spring onions until the 80s.  No idea how you spell it or where the word came from.    Your spelling looks  rather too close to "Hibees" for comfort though :whistling:  .... although both are green and bitter.  :gok: 

Though they don't make you cry when you slice them.

 

 

* just to say I have to intentions in slicing anyone up.  Just desperate to add to it

 

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33 minutes ago, Lone Striker said:

Thats what I always assumed it was too. But my granny & grandad had only one small kitchen in their Gorgie Road tenement and they called it a scullery.     

 

Theres a definition when you google it that suggests its derived from a French word for serving platter,  used to transport food to the table in big posh houses.  

 

If they didn't wash dishes anywhere else then it'd qualify as a scullery as well as being a kitchen, the french escuele directly translates to 'dish' but comes from the latin for salver or wooden platter, so what we thought were scottish words from our grannies was actually just bad latin for a place to wash dishes. 

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redtipsjambo

What about hunted,  as in that guy needs hunted(chased away)

said that to some edinburgh folk and they had never heard of it.

I'm the same with sibees, always called them that,  although I've seen cyboes as well

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54 minutes ago, Herbert said:

Slightly off topic 

 

stoavies.

 

Growing up it was sausage, onion and tatties all boiled together with gravy.

 

Is that the right way or is corned beef hash the right way?

 

you've gone and done it now. the fighting on the covid thread will pale into insignificance with the rammy that will happen with everyone telling each other what is the correct way of making stovies

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