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Getting Old


FWJ

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Just back from the pub (Tier 1 Woo Hoo!) with a mate.  Chatted about the football, his wife & kids, watched (volume down) Spurs v City.  But spent a lot of the time discussing our pensions.  Saturday night.  Talking about pensions.  Deary ******* me.

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Age is just a number. 

I've seen 73 year olds go on about not having long left and i've seen 73 year olds running marathons. life if what you make of it, and all that shizzo.

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1 hour ago, FWJ said:

Just back from the pub (Tier 1 Woo Hoo!) with a mate.  Chatted about the football, his wife & kids, watched (volume down) Spurs v City.  But spent a lot of the time discussing our pensions.  Saturday night.  Talking about pensions.  Deary ******* me.

Ha-ha.   (Young folk reading this will be seething that you've got a pension to discuss !!)

 

But it gets worse ......  when you start reminiscing about a work mate  you both knew 20 or 30 years ago - but your memory of him/her differs from your friend's.   You end up in a pointless/meandering/confused discussion which leaves you wondering if Alzheimers is setting in. 😜

 

 

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I often wonder what it will be like to get old. I don't think its anything to do with your body its the mind that has to keep working. Of course for the body and the mind you have to keep active. I had to quit golf, but I still walk as much as I can.  I need less sleep so get up early, but I have done that all my life, I read Kickback, keeps the mental juices going. sometimes gets the old blood boiling, check facebook then do three crosswords. Now because of life changes I do shopping, cooking and today as my wife and I did every Saturday  I swept thoroughly all the floors, cleaned the bathroom , scrubbed the kitchen, bathroom and laundry floors, I no longer do my wifes bathroom on a weekly basis because it is never used. Like the title says Getting Old it is a quandary I often wonder when it happens how I will handle it, no worries about pensions, reasonably comfortable, just the constant what is it going to be like when I do become old.

 

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46 minutes ago, Lone Striker said:

Ha-ha.   (Young folk reading this will be seething that you've got a pension to discuss !!)

 

But it gets worse ......  when you start reminiscing about a work mate  you both knew 20 or 30 years ago - but your memory of him/her differs from your friend's.   You end up in a pointless/meandering/confused discussion which leaves you wondering if Alzheimers is setting in. 😜

 

 

😂

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1 hour ago, Ulysses said:

On Friday I put in a request for a place on a pre-retirement course.

 

Thought you were aleady retired tbf but hope  request is sucessful :wink:

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Boston Jambo

15years ago I started getting junk mail from AARP ( American Association of Retired Persons)

 Then it was coming from the retirement homes mainly down in Florida.

More recently I'm getting the " Tidy up your affairs, don't burden your loved ones, buy your plot now"

FFS I'm only 63, don't hurry me.

 

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Apart from the aches, pains and bits falling off, I feel virtually the same as I did at 21. There's a strange old guy who looks back at me when I look in a mirror though - I feel like he's hijacked my face. I guess the fact that I'm now white-haired and don't shave very often, and so look like a less jolly version of Santa Claus, doesn't help though. :)

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SectionDJambo

It's a different experience for my generation. I couldn't imagine my old man going out cycling at 66. I see guys around my age, or older, out jogging. We are fortunate to have been around when working conditions were, generally, less physical and certainly much healthier.

My brain tells me I should still be able to do things that my body maybe doesn't think is a great idea. Older people tend to have a more positive attitude to life and fitness.

The only things I notice are that sometimes somebody's name escape me for a few moments, but the grey cells soon catch up, and I can't stop going for a pee when I'm having a drink, once I've been for the first one. 

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The Real Maroonblood
2 minutes ago, SectionDJambo said:

It's a different experience for my generation. I couldn't imagine my old man going out cycling at 66. I see guys around my age, or older, out jogging. We are fortunate to have been around when working conditions were, generally, less physical and certainly much healthier.

My brain tells me I should still be able to do things that my body maybe doesn't think is a great idea. Older people tend to have a more positive attitude to life and fitness.

The only things I notice are that sometimes somebody's name escape me for a few moments, but the grey cells soon catch up, and I can't stop going for a pee when I'm having a drink, once I've been for the first one. 

Good summary.

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jack D and coke
11 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

Posting pics of Jane Fonda on here😞

And to think you ripped into me for glorious Gloria tae...

giphy.gif?cid=4d1e4f29edsmbnlqh7he5szdqb

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23 minutes ago, SectionDJambo said:

It's a different experience for my generation. I couldn't imagine my old man going out cycling at 66. I see guys around my age, or older, out jogging. We are fortunate to have been around when working conditions were, generally, less physical and certainly much healthier.

My brain tells me I should still be able to do things that my body maybe doesn't think is a great idea. Older people tend to have a more positive attitude to life and fitness.

The only things I notice are that sometimes somebody's name escape me for a few moments, but the grey cells soon catch up, and I can't stop going for a pee when I'm having a drink, once I've been for the first one. 

Agree with most of this👍

It's worth remembering though our parents (I'm 69)had to fight a war. 

My Dad fought in the Burma campaign and although he lived to come home a succession of physical and mental health problems what we now refer to as PTSD gradually took its toll and he had to retire from the building trade in his early fifties and died at the age of 56.

My mother had to nurse him through his ill health as well as keep her job going because the help from the government was pitiful(a land fit for heroes🤔). 

They didn't have the chance to invest in private pensions. 

My Dad never even got to collect his state pension and the widows pension that my mother got was counted as 

'unearned income' and taxed on top of her wages which meant she was left with next to nothing. 

My first suit for starting work was bought with vouchers from the Earl Haig fund. 

I believe or generation although we had it hard early in life with post war austerity have really had the best of the deal. That's why we are mostly reasonably comfortable and able to keep active and live a worthwhile existence compared to our Parents generation. 

 

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willie wallace
45 minutes ago, SectionDJambo said:

It's a different experience for my generation. I couldn't imagine my old man going out cycling at 66. I see guys around my age, or older, out jogging. We are fortunate to have been around when working conditions were, generally, less physical and certainly much healthier.

My brain tells me I should still be able to do things that my body maybe doesn't think is a great idea. Older people tend to have a more positive attitude to life and fitness.

The only things I notice are that sometimes somebody's name escape me for a few moments, but the grey cells soon catch up, and I can't stop going for a pee when I'm having a drink, once I've been for the first one. 

Good summary.Saves me thinking about what to write😊

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John Gentleman
8 hours ago, redjambo said:

Apart from the aches, pains and bits falling off, I feel virtually the same as I did at 21. There's a strange old guy who looks back at me when I look in a mirror though - I feel like he's hijacked my face. I guess the fact that I'm now white-haired and don't shave very often, and so look like a less jolly version of Santa Claus, doesn't help though. :)

I know the feeling. It's not so much the mirrors in the hoose – they can be 'trained' as mine (and presumably yours) are. It's the ones in shopping centres, unfamiliar public toilets etc that catch you out. First thought is, "who's that auld *un*", before realising it's yerself.

Still, I sleep soundly and smugly at night in the knowledge that I know every single line, of every single rule about superannuation/retirement in Horsestralia!

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John Gentleman
20 minutes ago, luckydug said:

Agree with most of this👍

It's worth remembering though our parents (I'm 69)had to fight a war. 

My Dad fought in the Burma campaign and although he lived to come home a succession of physical and mental health problems what we now refer to as PTSD gradually took its toll and he had to retire from the building trade in his early fifties and died at the age of 56.

My mother had to nurse him through his ill health as well as keep her job going because the help from the government was pitiful(a land fit for heroes🤔). 

They didn't have the chance to invest in private pensions. 

My Dad never even got to collect his state pension and the widows pension that my mother got was counted as 

'unearned income' and taxed on top of her wages which meant she was left with next to nothing. 

My first suit for starting work was bought with vouchers from the Earl Haig fund. 

I believe or generation although we had it hard early in life with post war austerity have really had the best of the deal. That's why we are mostly reasonably comfortable and able to keep active and live a worthwhile existence compared to our Parents generation. 

 

I'm 67 and can relate entirely to that. My life story is almost parallel.

The barstewards knew exactly what they were doing when they set the pension age at 65, sound in the knowledge that if they had to pay out at all, it would only be for a few years. If your parents' dates of birth (roughly) coincide with mine, it wasn't just WWII they had to contend with. They would've been born in WWI, dodge the flu pandemic and navigate the great depression. It's no wonder my folk looked absolutely stuffed when they got to their mid 50s.

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12 hours ago, Lone Striker said:

Ha-ha.   (Young folk reading this will be seething that you've got a pension to discuss !!)

 

But it gets worse ......  when you start reminiscing about a work mate  you both knew 20 or 30 years ago - but your memory of him/her differs from your friend's.   You end up in a pointless/meandering/confused discussion which leaves you wondering if Alzheimers is setting in. 😜

 

 

I said the same thing when I was talking to myself the other day :( 

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highlandjambo3

Hey.......it’s just a number.

 

I will be 57 on my next birthday and, over the last week or so I’ve decided to cycle lands end to john o groats next year, September ish.

 

Drive down to England shire (with wife) she drives home, I knock out about 55 miles a day, will take me about 20 days, will start to plan this out soon.

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SectionDJambo
53 minutes ago, John Gentleman said:

The barstewards knew exactly what they were doing when they set the pension age at 65, sound in the knowledge that if they had to pay out at all, it would only be for a few years.

Aye 

And now they’re buggering about with the qualifying age because we are living longer. When I started work, before my eighteenth birthday, as far as I’m concerned I entered into a contract with the U.K. government that they would pay me a state pension at 65, not 65 and 11 months. 
Imagine a private insurance company just deciding they’re not paying your pension as initially agreed in your pension plan.

Many are going to have to wait longer and probably have to work longer. 

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SectionDJambo
13 minutes ago, highlandjambo3 said:

Hey.......it’s just a number.

 

I will be 57 on my next birthday and, over the last week or so I’ve decided to cycle lands end to john o groats next year, September ish.

 

Drive down to England shire (with wife) she drives home, I knock out about 55 miles a day, will take me about 20 days, will start to plan this out soon.

The saying goes something like, “you get old when you stop, don’t stop when you get older”.

Good luck with the cycle. It’s not all uphill going in that direction, I hope.🤔

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highlandjambo3
4 minutes ago, SectionDJambo said:

The saying goes something like, “you get old when you stop, don’t stop when you get older”.

Good luck with the cycle. It’s not all uphill going in that direction, I hope.🤔

Cheers...

makes sense doing it south to north as I’ll be passing my hoose with 3 days left for completion....feels like cycling home.

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1 hour ago, John Gentleman said:

I'm 67 and can relate entirely to that. My life story is almost parallel.

The barstewards knew exactly what they were doing when they set the pension age at 65, sound in the knowledge that if they had to pay out at all, it would only be for a few years. If your parents' dates of birth (roughly) coincide with mine, it wasn't just WWII they had to contend with. They would've been born in WWI, dodge the flu pandemic and navigate the great depression. It's no wonder my folk looked absolutely stuffed when they got to their mid 50s.

Yep very similar Dad born 1910 and Mum born 1918.

They went through a tough time that generation. 

As an example if you look at some of the historical crowd pictures of matches from over 60years ago, everyone looks old. 

Didn't stop Dad taking me to see the Hearts win their first League Title for 61 years back in 57/58 though ❤️

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1 hour ago, John Gentleman said:

I'm 67 and can relate entirely to that. My life story is almost parallel.

The barstewards knew exactly what they were doing when they set the pension age at 65, sound in the knowledge that if they had to pay out at all, it would only be for a few years. If your parents' dates of birth (roughly) coincide with mine, it wasn't just WWII they had to contend with. They would've been born in WWI, dodge the flu pandemic and navigate the great depression. It's no wonder my folk looked absolutely stuffed when they got to their mid 50s.

 

That's even if they made it to 65, both my Grandparents on my Mother's side didn't, 63 & 62 when they went.

 

Looking at old photos and from memory they looked really old at 60, nowadays most folks in their 80's look a damn site better than our parents/grandparents looked.  Just goes to show the tough life they often had, compared to the easy life we have now.

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Captain Sausage

I’m just over 30 and I feel old. 2 kids running laps round me, my back is always sore and suddenly my stamina is a bag of shit. I’m just assuming that there’ll be no stage pension and my private pension is forecasted to be £13k pa. Looks like I’ll be working til I pop my clogs. 

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Apart from the obvious physical signs of getting old, ever worsening tinnitus being the worst, it’s the occasional realisation that things you remember very clearly actually happened a long time ago, longer than you thought. For example I just saw a news item that it’s 23 years ago today since Michael Hutchence died. In my head it doesn’t seem that long ago. 

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Well read this thread and you'll really feel old.  Guys talking about their Dads having been in WW2, mine was in WW1. Two years in France with the Gordons. 

 with the Gordons, Two things I feel about age is if you think about it you'll feel it.The other is there is only one alternative if your old there is only one next stage, when you get old enough and less able to handle the travails of life that is not quite as frightening.

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The Real Maroonblood
1 hour ago, mutley said:

When does old age start? I’d say 50 but as I’m rapidly approaching 40 will I adjust my viewpoint later on?

That’s generally what happens.😄

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SectionDJambo
1 hour ago, highlandjambo3 said:

Cheers...

makes sense doing it south to north as I’ll be passing my hoose with 3 days left for completion....feels like cycling home.

When my son worked in Thurso we came across a few guys in a pub in Wick, who were having refreshments before completing the last leg.

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Only just turned 30 but pensions/retirement have been a hot topic in my house. 
Trying to persuade the missus to put some of her “expendable” income towards retirement as I have been doing (quite heavily). I fully intend to retire at 55 at the latest. I have told her I’m sacrificing a new pair of jeans here and there to stop full time work at an age I’ll still be able to enjoy myself fully. 
She wasn’t best pleased when I bluntly told her I wouldn’t subsidise her retiring early if it was me making all the ‘sacrifice’ now. :lol:
 

Trouble is she’s from a family that have typically had to work until they pop their clogs.

 

Sods law: I’ll die at 50 and she’ll enjoy my accumulated wealth with a sugar son in the French Riviera.

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The Real Maroonblood
1 minute ago, gjcc said:

Only just turned 30 but pensions/retirement have been a hot topic in my house. 
Trying to persuade the missus to put some of her “expendable” income towards retirement as I have been doing (quite heavily). I fully intend to retire at 55 at the latest. I have told her I’m sacrificing a new pair of jeans here and there to stop full time work at an age I’ll still be able to enjoy myself fully. 
She wasn’t best pleased when I bluntly told her I wouldn’t subsidise her retiring early if it was me making all the ‘sacrifice’ now. :lol:
 

Trouble is she’s from a family that have typically had to work until they pop their clogs.

 

Sods law: I’ll die at 50 and she’ll enjoy my accumulated wealth with a sugar son in the French Riviera.

:jjyay:

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1 hour ago, mutley said:

When does old age start? I’d say 50 but as I’m rapidly approaching 40 will I adjust my viewpoint later on?

You’re old when you don’t fall over, you have a fall.

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