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Haringshairband

Career Change at 40

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Haringshairband

I'm considering a career change and I've been looking at a variety of different courses. Has anyone successfully carried out a career change on here?

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TheOak88

What do you do at the moment? And what type of thing would you be looking to switch to?

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Haringshairband

I was a Property Manager but made redundant recently so I'm doing agency work, was looking at becoming a gas engineer or (a bit random i know) training to become a barber.

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Alan_R
30 minutes ago, Haringshairband said:

I was a Property Manager but made redundant recently so I'm doing agency work, was looking at becoming a gas engineer or (a bit random i know) training to become a barber.


always fancied being a barber. went to art college at one point, i know its not the same but reckon id have an eye for it. 

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Haringshairband
Just now, Alan_R said:


always fancied being a barber. went to art college at one point, i know its not the same but reckon id have an eye for it. 

Not sure it would be great pay but I've always fancied it too, as an artist I reckon your creativity would give you a head start.

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Alan_R
1 minute ago, Haringshairband said:

Not sure it would be great pay but I've always fancied it too, as an artist I reckon your creativity would give you a head start.


Any barber i know is driving a about in a flash motor doing good hours or by appointment. If you were willing to put the work in bashing out short back n sides i reckon can be a good living.

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Smithee
54 minutes ago, Haringshairband said:

I'm considering a career change and I've been looking at a variety of different courses. Has anyone successfully carried out a career change on here?

I quit offices a few years ago but I was pretty rudderless, I just went into factories and the like.

But it's been tough, I'm well into my 40s now and I can't be arsed with the physical stresses, so I did an SIA Door Supervisor course and I'm now looking for security guard work.

 

There's different jobs available with this license, from club bouncer to retail security, from corporate front desks to distribution gatehouses.

Me, I'm aiming for solitary night shifts, ideally on unused sites where you're only there for insurance reasons so I can chill and get on with my hobbies.

 

You may say I'm a dreamer...

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Haringshairband
22 minutes ago, Smithee said:

I quit offices a few years ago but I was pretty rudderless, I just went into factories and the like.

But it's been tough, I'm well into my 40s now and I can't be arsed with the physical stresses, so I did an SIA Door Supervisor course and I'm now looking for security guard work.

 

There's different jobs available with this license, from club bouncer to retail security, from corporate front desks to distribution gatehouses.

Me, I'm aiming for solitary night shifts, ideally on unused sites where you're only there for insurance reasons so I can chill and get on with my hobbies.

 

You may say I'm a dreamer...

I hated property management, it was utterly soul destroying. Hope you get something suitable soon.

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Smithee
2 minutes ago, Haringshairband said:

I hated property management, it was utterly soul destroying. Hope you get something suitable soon.

Cheers. I don't fancy the sound of that either, you'll have seen the worst of people I'm sure. **** that for a game of conkers.

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Dagger Is Back

Hell yeah. Worked in Financial Services from 17 until I was 43. Then lost my job out of the blue and bought into a sports coaching franchise which I've run on a self employed basis for the last 16 years.

 

Best thing that ever happened to me. Didn't feel like that at the time mind you. If it hadn't I'd be divorced or dead or perhaps both.

 

It's amazing the skills and qualities you'll have built over the years

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Dagger Is Back
44 minutes ago, Smithee said:

I quit offices a few years ago but I was pretty rudderless, I just went into factories and the like.

But it's been tough, I'm well into my 40s now and I can't be arsed with the physical stresses, so I did an SIA Door Supervisor course and I'm now looking for security guard work.

 

There's different jobs available with this license, from club bouncer to retail security, from corporate front desks to distribution gatehouses.

Me, I'm aiming for solitary night shifts, ideally on unused sites where you're only there for insurance reasons so I can chill and get on with my hobbies.

 

You may say I'm a dreamer...

 

But you're not the only one?

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Lobey Dosser

I've just graduated from uni at 42 for the 2nd time to go into classroom teaching after being a freelance musician for 10 years. Was a big decision and has been a bit of a rough ride, especially these last few months, but glad I bit the bullet and did it. I figured I'd have another good 25 years at work so wanted to make sure I'd be doing something that I both enjoyed, and that would be steady work. 

 

This is my second big change in direction after deciding to go full-time as a musician 10 years ago. I'd say go for it. Nothing ventured and all that. Good luck! 

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Haringshairband

These are the types of posts that I'm looking for to get me inspired.

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fast_blood
1 hour ago, Alan_R said:


always fancied being a barber. went to art college at one point, i know its not the same but reckon id have an eye for it. 

 

I did an intensive barbering course a few years ago. I would say a lot comes down to confidence. 

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Justin Z
27 minutes ago, Haringshairband said:

These are the types of posts that I'm looking for to get me inspired.

 

I worked in insurance for about ten years from 20-30, finished uni while doing that, then went to law school, worked as a lawyer until I moved to Scotland, took another degree there, and now at 40 I'm working for an audiobook and podcast production company, online.

 

I'd say one of the best things you can do to make yourself appealing to new jobs/careers is to never stop learning. If you've always got marketable skills, you'll always find a niche somewhere, even a totally different field than before.

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Smithee
1 hour ago, Lobey Dosser said:

I'd say go for it. Nothing ventured and all that. Good luck! 

You just summarised life there :thumbsup:

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jonesy

Left English Language Teaching to study horticulture. Got my HNC. Now doing unbelievable amounts of ELT including material writing, examining and teacher training. A while away from it was good. Still got the horticulture on hold until 2021. Either way, I’ll be doing something I’m good at and enjoy. 

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Alan_R
1 hour ago, Lobey Dosser said:

I've just graduated from uni at 42 for the 2nd time to go into classroom teaching after being a freelance musician for 10 years. Was a big decision and has been a bit of a rough ride, especially these last few months, but glad I bit the bullet and did it. I figured I'd have another good 25 years at work so wanted to make sure I'd be doing something that I both enjoyed, and that would be steady work. 

 

This is my second big change in direction after deciding to go full-time as a musician 10 years ago. I'd say go for it. Nothing ventured and all that. Good luck! 


Assuming you have other commitments, maybe a family etc how did you balance going back to uni?

I tried uni. hated it. But reckon now im more mature i could get through it as a means to an end.

I always had a notion for teaching but somehow wasnt for me. However I've saw they do outdoor education teaching courses. I can ski, snowboard, Rock climbed and abseiled as a teen, I've been gorge walking and white water rafting etc by no means experienced at any of these but its a pretty good base

Couldnt afford not to work full time though.

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Der Kaiser
Posted (edited)

Did it at 31. 

Used to work at Black Horse. 9 years there and hated every minute of it. It was easy and safe probably why I stayed long. Jacked it in for teaching (Had a Geography degree and considered teaching but was honestly done with studyingat that time.e). Missed the cut off for applications but still given an interview where I was told if someone dropped their acceptance then I'd be potentially picked. Didnt happen. Reapplied following year on time, got an interview,  same folk said they were happy I came back and got accepted. Handed in my notice......which felt amazing!!!

Did my one year PGDE (loved being a mature student as I actually had the maturity to study, organise my time etc far better than as a teenager).

6 years mainstream secondary teaching. Now 6 years in ASN teaching which I took to really well...patience of a saint served me good...plus I do NOT miss marking homework 

 

Sooooo glad I did it. Better pay, amazing holidays and importantly I actually enjoy it.

 

.....sure I've been slapped, scratched, had clothes torn, hair pulled, punched, kicked, spat on, thrown up on, bitten, hit on the head with a chair, had numerous objects of varying size and weight thrown at me...and recently broke my leg......and I'd still do it all again.

 

I reckon its important you take a bit of time and think about a job you want to do....not necessarily something you think will be good.

 

Oh.....the downside bit.....can't be all chocolate boxes and roses

(Relied on help from my parents and wife working extra hours for the financial bit. Cashed in pension from Black Horse. Plus had to pay my fees back when teaching but was deducted straight from salary. Probably did contribute to my eventual divorce as initially struggled to get that full time contract. Also suffered really badly with depression.....very low points in my life which looked close to me checking out.

Wife walked out one day, sick of me, even admitted she thought I made my depression up as an attempt to save the marriage...got my head screwed on with the help of actually talking to folk and pills......made permanent a few months later......less nagging actually helped me! 

 

Boom. Happy as a pig in sheet now

 

 :rofl:

Edited by Der Kaiser

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Lobey Dosser
1 hour ago, Alan_R said:


Assuming you have other commitments, maybe a family etc how did you balance going back to uni?

I tried uni. hated it. But reckon now im more mature i could get through it as a means to an end.

I always had a notion for teaching but somehow wasnt for me. However I've saw they do outdoor education teaching courses. I can ski, snowboard, Rock climbed and abseiled as a teen, I've been gorge walking and white water rafting etc by no means experienced at any of these but its a pretty good base

Couldnt afford not to work full time though.

It was hard at times. It was a 4 year course and even though my wife works full time  I was still working nights and weekends, and as much as I could through any holidays. I basically just had to get through the 4 years with not much of a social life. But it was really satisfying and I'd do it again. I already had a degree but in a totally different area and I graduated the first time by the skin of my teeth so I was determined not to make the same mistakes this time. I was definitely better equipped to be a student at 38 when I started than I was at 18. 

 

I think if you've got a passion for something then go for it. 

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Lobey Dosser
17 minutes ago, Der Kaiser said:

Did it at 31. 

Used to work at Black Horse. 9 years there and hated every minute of it. It was easy and safe probably why I stayed long. Jacked it in for teaching (Had a Geography degree and considered teaching but was honestly done with studyingat that time.e). Missed the cut off for applications but still given an interview where I was told if someone dropped their acceptance then I'd be potentially picked. Didnt happen. Reapplied following year on time, got an interview,  same folk said they were happy I came back and got accepted. Handed in my notice......which felt amazing!!!

Did my one year PGDE (loved being a mature student as I actually had the maturity to study, organise my time etc far better than as a teenager).

6 years mainstream secondary teaching. Now 6 years in ASN teaching which I took to really well...patience of a saint served me good...plus I do NOT miss marking homework 

 

Sooooo glad I did it. Better pay, amazing holidays and importantly I actually enjoy it.

 

.....sure I've been slapped, scratched, had clothes torn, hair pulled, punched, kicked, spat on, thrown up on, bitten, hit on the head with a chair, had numerous objects of varying size and weight thrown at me...and recently broke my leg......and I'd still do it all again.

 

I reckon its important you take a bit of time and think about a job you want to do....not necessarily something you think will be good.

 

I did ASN teaching in my 3rd and 4th year as an elective and absolutely loved it. Had 2 amazing placements at an ASN school in Motherwell and I'm seriously considering pursuing it as a career after my probationary year. It was the most rewarding thing I've ever done. 

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ri Alban

I think I'll use this 'career change' patter, the next time I start a new job. 

Career change 🤣

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Lemongrab
2 hours ago, ri Alban said:

I think I'll use this 'career change' patter, the next time I start a new job. 

Career change 🤣

You sound like you've maybe been careering from one job to another. :D 

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Locky
11 hours ago, Alan_R said:


Any barber i know is driving a about in a flash motor doing good hours or by appointment. If you were willing to put the work in bashing out short back n sides i reckon can be a good living.

I've always felt being a barber must be a bit like being a taxi driver (pay wise I mean). When you start off it's chair rental which takes up a good chunk of your earnings, much the same as cabbies renting another's taxi for the night. If you're lucky enough to ever own your own barbers (or taxi) then you can make good money no doubt, especially cos you can rent out to newbies.

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Harry Potter
19 minutes ago, Locky said:

I've always felt being a barber must be a bit like being a taxi driver (pay wise I mean). When you start off it's chair rental which takes up a good chunk of your earnings, much the same as cabbies renting another's taxi for the night. If you're lucky enough to ever own your own barbers (or taxi) then you can make good money no doubt, especially cos you can rent out to newbies.

Just go round folks houses and cut hair, no problem with renting chairs.

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Haringshairband
4 hours ago, ri Alban said:

I think I'll use this 'career change' patter, the next time I start a new job. 

Career change 🤣

:rofl:it's not just starting a new job though it's retraining completely.

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davemclaren

Left school at 18 and worked, in RBS Branches, for 5 years, not really enjoying it.  Left at age 23 to become a student And get a degree. On graduating I worked in IT for the next 32 years. Change is good though I accept it’s likely harder to do it the older you get. 

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Locky
2 hours ago, Harry Potter said:

Just go round folks houses and cut hair, no problem with renting chairs.

Probably not advisable in the current climate. :) 

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Governor Tarkin
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, ri Alban said:

I think I'll use this 'career change' patter, the next time I start a new job. 

Career change 🤣

 

It'll be better than your usual patter tbf.

 

13 hours ago, Justin Z said:

 

I worked in insurance for about ten years from 20-30, finished uni while doing that, then went to law school, worked as a lawyer until I moved to Scotland, took another degree there, and now at 40 I'm working for an audiobook and podcast production company, online.

 

I'd say one of the best things you can do to make yourself appealing to new jobs/careers is to never stop learning. If you've always got marketable skills, you'll always find a niche somewhere, even a totally different field than before.

 

Wait... you're 40? :(

 

p.s. @Haringshairband, do it. 👍

Edited by Governor Tarkin

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Locky

I worked on building sites and in a civil enforcement (:ninja:) role after I dropped out of college. After 6 years doing the latter I decided enough was enough and I needed a bit of a career. Mainly I was sick of working outdoors all the time and doing a job that was always quite physically strenuous. Not that I mind either in good measures, but constant is too much.

 

So, for almost 2 years now I've been working in the civil service in a desk job. Main selling point was 'career opportunities'. My previous job was difficult for progression. Same arseholes in the same positions of power in the 6 years I was there and they will still be there in 6 years. At least the Civil Service I at least have plenty of options.

 

That said, I'm still yet to find the right balance. I miss being on my feet sometimes or out and about. There's days when I look out my window and am grateful to not be working on the streets anymore in it but then there are plenty days when the thought of sitting at a desk all day really bring me down, but flexitime certainly helps. :jjyay:

 

I'm still a few years off of 30 so no reason to worry yet, just happy to earn a wage even if it isn't great. But I've struggled all my life to really find something I want to do, and then have the motivation to go and do it. Hopefully I'll find my calling somewhere.

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Herbert
15 hours ago, Haringshairband said:

I was a Property Manager but made redundant recently so I'm doing agency work, was looking at becoming a gas engineer or (a bit random i know) training to become a barber.

 

I would recommend barbering to anyone, I'm opening my shop on Wednesday after about a year and a half out. If you like talking shit all day and having a laugh then you'll love it, It's tough at the start, I thought I was shit or the job was shit and wanted to give up, when it clicks though the only thing that can make your day hard is peoples attitudes. You can make very good money, going by the average gas engineer salary of 37k I would say you could make more in the barbers depending on the shop. If you decide to go down the route let me know I'll help you out

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Haringshairband
19 minutes ago, Herbert said:

 

I would recommend barbering to anyone, I'm opening my shop on Wednesday after about a year and a half out. If you like talking shit all day and having a laugh then you'll love it, It's tough at the start, I thought I was shit or the job was shit and wanted to give up, when it clicks though the only thing that can make your day hard is peoples attitudes. You can make very good money, going by the average gas engineer salary of 37k I would say you could make more in the barbers depending on the shop. If you decide to go down the route let me know I'll help you out

I've just applied to college to do Level 2 in Commercial Barbering so hopefully I get a place. To be honest it's not all about the money for me, I want to do something that excites me and this does. I love talking shit everyday. Thanks for the offer to help me out that's really appreciated.

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hmfcbilly
1 hour ago, Haringshairband said:

I've just applied to college to do Level 2 in Commercial Barbering so hopefully I get a place. To be honest it's not all about the money for me, I want to do something that excites me and this does. I love talking shit everyday. Thanks for the offer to help me out that's really appreciated.

Good luck with your college application mate and I hope all works out well for you in the future. 

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hmfcbilly
2 hours ago, Locky said:

I worked on building sites and in a civil enforcement (:ninja:) role after I dropped out of college. After 6 years doing the latter I decided enough was enough and I needed a bit of a career. Mainly I was sick of working outdoors all the time and doing a job that was always quite physically strenuous. Not that I mind either in good measures, but constant is too much.

 

So, for almost 2 years now I've been working in the civil service in a desk job. Main selling point was 'career opportunities'. My previous job was difficult for progression. Same arseholes in the same positions of power in the 6 years I was there and they will still be there in 6 years. At least the Civil Service I at least have plenty of options.

 

That said, I'm still yet to find the right balance. I miss being on my feet sometimes or out and about. There's days when I look out my window and am grateful to not be working on the streets anymore in it but then there are plenty days when the thought of sitting at a desk all day really bring me down, but flexitime certainly helps. :jjyay:

 

I'm still a few years off of 30 so no reason to worry yet, just happy to earn a wage even if it isn't great. But I've struggled all my life to really find something I want to do, and then have the motivation to go and do it. Hopefully I'll find my calling somewhere.

I was always a bit envious of the kids at school who had a 'definite' career plan all the way through. I left school at 16 and took an office junior job. The money was alright for my age and I got a free bus pass 😂😂 i then went on to work in banking, recruitment and logistics. I thought I'd found my career path when I started working for a vehicle component company at 25. I worked my way up to a assistant manager and the natural progression was to take over from the manager once he retired. Once I entered that office as an assistant I quickly realised that management wasn't the job for me. To be a good manager you really need to play to peoples strengths and that includes getting the best out of moaning, lazy barstewards too. I don't have the patience for that  it was hard to admit to myself but aside from the decent salary and company car, idve been miserable in that job more often than not and I likely wouldntve lasted too long at it anyway! I took a step back 2 and a half years ago and joined the railway to clean trains. It was a hefty reduction in salary but my wife and I talked it through and decided we would manage as fortunately she works too so we could manage financially. I started looking at long term career options about 6 years ago and the railway appealed. Theres a lot of decent paying jobs in the industry with good perks too. Yes the shifts are tough in a lot of the roles but for me the positives outweigh the negatives. After a year of cleaning I applied internally for a driving job and was very fortunate to be successful in that application so quickly. Im 40 in a couple of months so hopefully that's me found my life career now but the point I'm making I guess is that it took me until my late 30s to find something I really enjoyed doing so wouldn't panic too much at your age especially as state retirement age will sadly likely be about 70 for you🙈😣. Another good thing about the railwayis you still get a final salary pension so regardless of state pension age i'll be off by 65!!

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Locky
2 minutes ago, hmfcbilly said:

I was always a bit envious of the kids at school who had a 'definite' career plan all the way through. I left school at 16 and took an office junior job. The money was alright for my age and I got a free bus pass 😂😂 i then went on to work in banking, recruitment and logistics. I thought I'd found my career path when I started working for a vehicle component company at 25. I worked my way up to a assistant manager and the natural progression was to take over from the manager once he retired. Once I entered that office as an assistant I quickly realised that management wasn't the job for me. To be a good manager you really need to play to peoples strengths and that includes getting the best out of moaning, lazy barstewards too. I don't have the patience for that  it was hard to admit to myself but aside from the decent salary and company car, idve been miserable in that job more often than not and I likely wouldntve lasted too long at it anyway! I took a step back 2 and a half years ago and joined the railway to clean trains. It was a hefty reduction in salary but my wife and I talked it through and decided we would manage as fortunately she works too so we could manage financially. I started looking at long term career options about 6 years ago and the railway appealed. Theres a lot of decent paying jobs in the industry with good perks too. Yes the shifts are tough in a lot of the roles but for me the positives outweigh the negatives. After a year of cleaning I applied internally for a driving job and was very fortunate to be successful in that application so quickly. Im 40 in a couple of months so hopefully that's me found my life career now but the point I'm making I guess is that it took me until my late 30s to find something I really enjoyed doing so wouldn't panic too much at your age especially as state retirement age will sadly likely be about 70 for you🙈😣. Another good thing about the railwayis you still get a final salary pension so regardless of state pension age i'll be off by 65!!

I left school at 15 too with no inclination of what I really wanted to do. My Dad used to always get on at me to get a trade under my belt but I had zero interest because I felt I should aim for something I enjoy. Turns out when I ended up on building sites that I loved it and maybe my old man had been right, but then again I've never met anyone who's spent 20-30 years plus in the trades and actually been happy!

 

I went to Telford College to do sport and fitness courses with a view to going into coaching, particularly football. Around about the same time though I got in with a local football club and found myself getting all the opportunities I needed there. I was coaching 4 age groups including under 15's at the age of 16, and even made money doing it through community days and stuff that the club were paid for. Sort of made me wonder what the **** I was doing wasting my time playing netball at college for. :lol: I still am in football but now run a men's team as secretary. The more I coached the more I realised that I'm not really a 'balls and bibs' man but more the observant, man management type. Quite hard to get opportunities in that sort of style though unless you've played at a good level which I definitely haven't!

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Stuart Lyon

I tried being a barber but couldn't cut it!

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Justin Z
3 hours ago, Governor Tarkin said:

Wait... you're 40? :(


Sure am, Gov. Just yesterday I was thinking about a revelation I had when I was 25, that it meant I was a quarter of a century old . . . and that was 15 years ago. 💀

 

Where'd the time go--for all of us?

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Governor Tarkin
4 minutes ago, Justin Z said:

 

Where'd the time go--for all of us?

 

The thick end of a whisky bottle, buddy.

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Eldar Hadzimehmedovic
Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Haringshairband said:

These are the types of posts that I'm looking for to get me inspired.

 

I did a postgrad degree in my 20s in journalism but never used it. Then worked in banking for a bit before working for myself as a small business for ten years. That was physical work though and I didn't fancy doing that into my 50s. Started another postgrad in counselling/psychology three years ago and just graduated at 43. Working at two different places now. These weren't always confident decisions though - I was full of self-doubt, imposter syndrome, and "I'm too old for this" moments. Worth it though. Change is good and you're never too old for anything. All the best with it!

Edited by Eldar Hadzimehmedovic

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Harry Potter
4 hours ago, Locky said:

Probably not advisable in the current climate. :) 

Very true, but idea for the future, 

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JimmyCant

I was a police officer for 25 years until pensioned out on ill health with a pension. I was in my mid forties so not ready to retire even though I probably could have afforded it. My first thought on a new career was that it had to be an enjoyable job and something I was passionate about. I think thats the biggest tip I would give to someone changing career in middle age. Make sure it something you REALLY want to do for a living. I chose tourism and Ive had a number of jobs in that line, starting in a reservation call centre, picking us contacts on the way and eventually worked up to senior management in hotels. Unfortunately Ive just been made redundant, which is only manageable because of my pension and the fact I'm nearly there for state pension age anyway. I loved being in tourism. Didn't miss the police for one single moment, even though I worked in some outwardly glamorous sounding roles (not all they were cracked up to be, some of them)

 

Jobs and career change isn't something Id jump into right now. Stick where you are, let things settle down, then see where we are in a years time. Some sectors that were thriving not so long ago are about to go through a thunderstorm and no guarantee they will remain intact. If your current job is secure, I wouldn't dream of changing it for at least another 18 months. I see the OP has been made redundant so that advice wouldn't apply to him.

 

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hmfcbilly
3 hours ago, Locky said:

I left school at 15 too with no inclination of what I really wanted to do. My Dad used to always get on at me to get a trade under my belt but I had zero interest because I felt I should aim for something I enjoy. Turns out when I ended up on building sites that I loved it and maybe my old man had been right, but then again I've never met anyone who's spent 20-30 years plus in the trades and actually been happy!

 

I went to Telford College to do sport and fitness courses with a view to going into coaching, particularly football. Around about the same time though I got in with a local football club and found myself getting all the opportunities I needed there. I was coaching 4 age groups including under 15's at the age of 16, and even made money doing it through community days and stuff that the club were paid for. Sort of made me wonder what the **** I was doing wasting my time playing netball at college for. :lol: I still am in football but now run a men's team as secretary. The more I coached the more I realised that I'm not really a 'balls and bibs' man but more the observant, man management type. Quite hard to get opportunities in that sort of style though unless you've played at a good level which I definitely haven't!

Funny you say that Locky as I myself had the choice of the £30 a week trade apprenticeship or £90 a week office job and I took the higher wage. Often used to think (especially in my 20s) how I wished I'd learned a trade but its worked out not too bad for me now.  Your right though...never met anyone in their 40s or 50s who don't say they wished they weren't still in their trade but maybe its an age thing?!

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Justin Z
4 hours ago, Governor Tarkin said:

The thick end of a whisky bottle, buddy.

 

tenor.gif

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Locky
1 hour ago, hmfcbilly said:

Funny you say that Locky as I myself had the choice of the £30 a week trade apprenticeship or £90 a week office job and I took the higher wage. Often used to think (especially in my 20s) how I wished I'd learned a trade but its worked out not too bad for me now.  Your right though...never met anyone in their 40s or 50s who don't say they wished they weren't still in their trade but maybe its an age thing?!

It's a great environment to be in. Real camaraderie, and some of the laughs I had will stay with me forever. Met some great guys in my time on the sites. But it really is an environment that unless you've got great guys beside you, it must be pretty soul destroying.  Same shit day in, day out, working mainly in the freezing cold and pishing rain. Bit like my 6 year spell (sentence) in the parking game. :D 

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hmfcbilly
1 hour ago, Locky said:

It's a great environment to be in. Real camaraderie, and some of the laughs I had will stay with me forever. Met some great guys in my time on the sites. But it really is an environment that unless you've got great guys beside you, it must be pretty soul destroying.  Same shit day in, day out, working mainly in the freezing cold and pishing rain. Bit like my 6 year spell (sentence) in the parking game. :D 

Aye you definitely would need a sense of humour in that game, especially through the winter mate! You could probably apply that theory to a lot of jobs i reckon.....even the most monotonous, repetitive job can be alright if you've got decent folk around you whilst you do it. Certainly helps get you through the day. A bit like watching the jambos the past 18months really...its your pals sat beside you thst get you through the 90mins 😂😂

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Locky
10 minutes ago, hmfcbilly said:

Aye you definitely would need a sense of humour in that game, especially through the winter mate! You could probably apply that theory to a lot of jobs i reckon.....even the most monotonous, repetitive job can be alright if you've got decent folk around you whilst you do it. Certainly helps get you through the day. A bit like watching the jambos the past 18months really...its your pals sat beside you thst get you through the 90mins 😂😂

My bird comes to most games with me, sometimes she just adds to the misery. :lol: 

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Lobey Dosser
5 hours ago, Eldar Hadzimehmedovic said:

 

I did a postgrad degree in my 20s in journalism but never used it. Then worked in banking for a bit before working for myself as a small business for ten years. That was physical work though and I didn't fancy doing that into my 50s. Started another postgrad in counselling/psychology three years ago and just graduated at 43. Working at two different places now. These weren't always confident decisions though - I was full of self-doubt, imposter syndrome, and "I'm too old for this" moments. Worth it though. Change is good and you're never too old for anything. All the best with it!

My whole first and second year at uni I was in a constant state of "I'm too old for this", but it was definitely worth it in the end.

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hmfcbilly
1 hour ago, Locky said:

My bird comes to most games with me, sometimes she just adds to the misery. :lol: 

😂😂😂

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Shapes
Posted (edited)

I have a degree in marketing and worked in financial services marketing for a few years after I graduated. My job made me ill. I didn't even realise at the time that it was one of the biggest reasons my mental health was rock bottom. It all came to a head two years ago when I had spiralled a bit and had a lot else going on in my life too. Reached the stage I physically could not enter my place of work. I was signed off for 2 weeks, and then signed off for another 2 weeks. I remember thinking that I just could not ever go back. I took a complete punt at going back to uni. Saw there was places on nursing which I thought I could see myself doing. I sent off an enquiry through their clearing form, got an email back the next day asking me to go for an interview the following Tuesday. Went, got accepted that day, and started the following Monday. I now qualify as a nurse in just over a year (I'll be 32), my mental health has never been better and I have just never looked back since making that decision.

Edited by Shapes

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graygo
10 hours ago, Stuart Lyon said:

I tried being a barber but couldn't cut it!

 

Very funny, you could get a job at the fringe. 😀

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