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The Mighty Thor

Growing Up Poor

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The Mighty Thor

Did anyone watch this on Channel 4's Dispatches?

 

Absolutely harrowing stuff.

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Herbert

I grew up poor and now despise them. Most are lazy and afraid of the hard work involved in dragging yourself up from the scum.

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GinRummy
17 minutes ago, Herbert said:

I grew up poor and now despise them. Most are lazy and afraid of the hard work involved in dragging yourself up from the scum.

 

At least you're not judgemental and bitter.

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stevie1874
4 minutes ago, GinRummy said:

 

At least you're not judgemental and bitter.

😂

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vegas-voss
1 hour ago, Herbert said:

I grew up poor and now despise them. Most are lazy and afraid of the hard work involved in dragging yourself up from the scum.

I tend to find that the lazy and never done hard work are the ones that lead a nice comfy life on benefits( I know folk who have never worked a day in there life that are very happy ).As another poster pointed out though that's extremely narrow minded lots would love to work or do work and just make ends meet , others trying to better themselves going nightschool etc but all struggling away with families it's so wrong to say that struggling financially is because you are lazy.

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doctor jambo
1 hour ago, Herbert said:

I grew up poor and now despise them. Most are lazy and afraid of the hard work involved in dragging yourself up from the scum.

Poverty is relative.

I grew up "poor",  one working parent, no benefits, second hand clothes, bikes, never set foot on a plane until I was 23, never stayed in a hotel until I was in my 20's.

Never ate out in restaurants, never had take-away food unless my grandparents paid for it.

Wife was from a single parent family in a rough scheme.

It was instilled in us early that if we wanted better we had to work for it- in school.

So both of us did, as did our siblings.

So out the 5 kids in 2 poor families none of us are poor within a generation all our parents grandkids- 8 of them are all at private school, and we are all working professionals.

It is a work ethic, a mentality, and involves sacrifice.

It only takes one generation to dig yourself out

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John Findlay

It is all relative.

Was brought up mainly by my dad, my mum was an alcoholic and took her frustrations out on me.

Dad instilled into me that good old fashioned Scottish work ethic(long gone now in most schemes), left school at 16 after sitting 7 o grades in 1979. Apart from 3 months out of work between July 2005, when IBM laid me off, and Nov 2005 when I started work for Scotrail and btw IBM was 35,000-40,000pa. The job at Scotrail at the time was 14,000pa. I wanted to work.so ive worked almost all my adult life. 

I thought I was poor growing up in Royston, West Pilton and for nearly a year Gracemount. Until I visited places like Pakistan, Egypt, Carribean islands etc. So called poverty here is nothing compared to those places. I live now on West Granton Road just around from Royston Mains Road. Every day I see the wasters(yes they are wasters) the world owes me a living but there is no chance I'm going to work for it. These people had the same choices as me. THEY CHOSE NOT TO MAKE THE RIGHT ONES, NO ONE ELSE THEMSELVES. 

I hear them saying. The foreigners have taking our jobs. No they didnt. You didnt go for the jobs in the first place.

Its everyone else's fault bar their own. Mentality that is now into 3rd and 4th generations and it's a mentality that is not going to be broken anytime soon.

When I get accused of having a I'm alright jack attitude. I will smile to myself they have no idea what they are talking about. Because I've worked hard damn hard that has put my two eldest through university. Working hard and bettering yourself has become a crime to many nowadays. In all honesty I really dont give a **** if that's your opinion.

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AlimOzturk

I suppose being poor is relative and what a person judges as being "poor"

 

We weren't exactly rich and didnt go fancy holidays or live in the best of areas but we never went hungry or without decent clothes. I was always happy though. 

 

Give the above to someone who has lived in luxury their whole life and they would most likely be miserable. Probably explains why I am not a materialist person these days even though I am fairly comfortable money wise.

 

 

Edited by AlimOzturk

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vegas-voss
1 hour ago, doctor jambo said:

Poverty is relative.

I grew up "poor",  one working parent, no benefits, second hand clothes, bikes, never set foot on a plane until I was 23, never stayed in a hotel until I was in my 20's.

Never ate out in restaurants, never had take-away food unless my grandparents paid for it.

Wife was from a single parent family in a rough scheme.

It was instilled in us early that if we wanted better we had to work for it- in school.

So both of us did, as did our siblings.

So out the 5 kids in 2 poor families none of us are poor within a generation all our parents grandkids- 8 of them are all at private school, and we are all working professionals.

It is a work ethic, a mentality, and involves sacrifice.

It only takes one generation to dig yourself out

But what if they end up a single parent ?

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Icon of Symmetry
2 hours ago, Herbert said:

I grew up poor and now despise them. Most are lazy and afraid of the hard work involved in dragging yourself up from the scum.

 

Lordy...

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doctor jambo
23 minutes ago, vegas-voss said:

But what if they end up a single parent ?

What if the do?

Its not the end.

They can either raise their kids to surrender  to their circumstances or work and strive their way out of it, though we would of course help them as much as we could.

There is nothing we would not do for our kids- and a large part of that is ethic.

OUr kids have a fearsome work ethic, and I cannot see that leaving them no matter what life throws in their way.

Some people end up in wheelchairs and it makes them, some it breaks them.

I am  big believer in resilience

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Superunknown
1 hour ago, John Findlay said:

It is all relative.

Was brought up mainly by my dad, my mum was an alcoholic and took her frustrations out on me.

Dad instilled into me that good old fashioned Scottish work ethic(long gone now in most schemes), left school at 16 after sitting 7 o grades in 1979. Apart from 3 months out of work between July 2005, when IBM laid me off, and Nov 2005 when I started work for Scotrail and btw IBM was 35,000-40,000pa. The job at Scotrail at the time was 14,000pa. I wanted to work.so ive worked almost all my adult life. 

I thought I was poor growing up in Royston, West Pilton and for nearly a year Gracemount. Until I visited places like Pakistan, Egypt, Carribean islands etc. So called poverty here is nothing compared to those places. I live now on West Granton Road just around from Royston Mains Road. Every day I see the wasters(yes they are wasters) the world owes me a living but there is no chance I'm going to work for it. These people had the same choices as me. THEY CHOSE NOT TO MAKE THE RIGHT ONES, NO ONE ELSE THEMSELVES. 

I hear them saying. The foreigners have taking our jobs. No they didnt. You didnt go for the jobs in the first place.

Its everyone else's fault bar their own. Mentality that is now into 3rd and 4th generations and it's a mentality that is not going to be broken anytime soon.

When I get accused of having a I'm alright jack attitude. I will smile to myself they have no idea what they are talking about. Because I've worked hard damn hard that has put my two eldest through university. Working hard and bettering yourself has become a crime to many nowadays. In all honesty I really dont give a **** if that's your opinion.

Fair play to you mate. It sounds like you've done well with the hand you were given. 

 

Sounds like you're dad did well by installing a good work ethic into you. Imagine where you'd be if your dad wasn't around and you were left to be raised by your mum? That's the situation for a lot of kids growing up sadly. :(

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Cade

Circumstances are very different now than when the "I'm alright jack" crowd grew up.

 

"Work hard" isn't enough any more as there are untold thousands of people in the UK who have a full time job but are still struggling due to the unregulated rental market, utilities cartels and the cost of commuting (especially via train) all combing to ensure that almost every penny earned is handed straight over at the end of every month.

Many families are one small event away from needing to visit a foodbank.

If your oven or fridge breaks down, it's something that has to be replaced right away and this pushes them into debt which takes months to pay off.

 

I grew up relatively poor, growing veg in the back green, going to school with fried potato peelings for a break time snack, never going further than 50 mils away on holiday and even then it was in a caravan borrowed from a family friend. 

But despite these hardships, my parents were actually able to save some money at the end of the month and finally managed to put a deposit down on a house and escaped the rent trap.

In 2019 families with two working parents are still not able to put enough away to save for a deposit due to the housing bubble putting up the cost of a deposit faster than they can save and rising rents meaning they have less they can save each month.

People are trapped forever in a cycle of poverty and just because you remember how you managed to escape it 30-40 years ago does not mean the same escape routes are open today.

 

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vegas-voss
40 minutes ago, doctor jambo said:

What if the do?

Its not the end.

They can either raise their kids to surrender  to their circumstances or work and strive their way out of it, though we would of course help them as much as we could.

There is nothing we would not do for our kids- and a large part of that is ethic.

OUr kids have a fearsome work ethic, and I cannot see that leaving them no matter what life throws in their way.

Some people end up in wheelchairs and it makes them, some it breaks them.

I am  big believer in resilience

I'm just saying you yourself described yourself as in a poor  working single parent family as a child.

Edited by vegas-voss

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davemclaren
46 minutes ago, doctor jambo said:

What if the do?

Its not the end.

They can either raise their kids to surrender  to their circumstances or work and strive their way out of it, though we would of course help them as much as we could.

There is nothing we would not do for our kids- and a large part of that is ethic.

OUr kids have a fearsome work ethic, and I cannot see that leaving them no matter what life throws in their way.

Some people end up in wheelchairs and it makes them, some it breaks them.

I am  big believer in resilience

Remind me not to visit you re my haemorrhoids. 🤔

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doctor jambo
14 minutes ago, vegas-voss said:

I'm just saying you yourself described yourself as in a poor  working single parent family as a child.

My wife was in a single parent family,

I had one parent working, should have been clearer

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hughesie27

1 in 3 Edinburgh Kids are living in Poverty. Be willing to bet a large chunk of them come from a house where at least 1 parent is in work.

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doctor jambo
33 minutes ago, Cade said:

Circumstances are very different now than when the "I'm alright jack" crowd grew up.

 

"Work hard" isn't enough any more as there are untold thousands of people in the UK who have a full time job but are still struggling due to the unregulated rental market, utilities cartels and the cost of commuting (especially via train) all combing to ensure that almost every penny earned is handed straight over at the end of every month.

Many families are one small event away from needing to visit a foodbank.

If your oven or fridge breaks down, it's something that has to be replaced right away and this pushes them into debt which takes months to pay off.

 

I grew up relatively poor, growing veg in the back green, going to school with fried potato peelings for a break time snack, never going further than 50 mils away on holiday and even then it was in a caravan borrowed from a family friend. 

But despite these hardships, my parents were actually able to save some money at the end of the month and finally managed to put a deposit down on a house and escaped the rent trap.

In 2019 families with two working parents are still not able to put enough away to save for a deposit due to the housing bubble putting up the cost of a deposit faster than they can save and rising rents meaning they have less they can save each month.

People are trapped forever in a cycle of poverty and just because you remember how you managed to escape it 30-40 years ago does not mean the same escape routes are open today.

 

Things are not different.

The kids I went to school with who did not bother at school achieved little by and large regardless of background- rich/poor.

The ones who did bother at school did succeed regardless of background.

Having three kids at school at present  I see exactly the same pattern emerging with their friends.

Grafters do better.

The government provide the same basic tools to all.

Some take advantage of what is afforded and some do not.

Success begins at home- its all about the parents.

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vegas-voss
4 minutes ago, doctor jambo said:

Things are not different.

The kids I went to school with who did not bother at school achieved little by and large regardless of background- rich/poor.

The ones who did bother at school did succeed regardless of background.

Having three kids at school at present  I see exactly the same pattern emerging with their friends.

Grafters do better.

The government provide the same basic tools to all.

Some take advantage of what is afforded and some do not.

Success begins at home- its all about the parents.

Not sure it really works like that I know people that were thick as shit at school still are in some aspects but through hard graft and knowing the value of money  have made a very decent life for themselves on the other hand I know many that done well at school then became complete drop outs.

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doctor jambo
2 minutes ago, vegas-voss said:

Not sure it really works like that I know people that were thick as shit at school still are in some aspects but through hard graft and knowing the value of money  have made a very decent life for themselves on the other hand I know many that done well at school then became complete drop outs.

That is pretty much what I said- its about ethic and hard work.

All studies have shown that private education is less important than parental attitude to education.

Not sure how government intervention is going to change mindsets.

All the big, shiny, modern schools and equipment have not budged academic achievement even a FRACTION in the right direction, nor will it.

 

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hughesie27
19 minutes ago, doctor jambo said:

Things are not different.

The kids I went to school with who did not bother at school achieved little by and large regardless of background- rich/poor.

The ones who did bother at school did succeed regardless of background.

Having three kids at school at present  I see exactly the same pattern emerging with their friends.

Grafters do better.

The government provide the same basic tools to all.

Some take advantage of what is afforded and some do not.

Success begins at home- its all about the parents.

You must know how it feels to be like the Conservatice party members who are completely out of touch with reality.

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vegas-voss
6 minutes ago, doctor jambo said:

That is pretty much what I said- its about ethic and hard work.

All studies have shown that private education is less important than parental attitude to education.

Not sure how government intervention is going to change mindsets.

All the big, shiny, modern schools and equipment have not budged academic achievement even a FRACTION in the right direction, nor will it.

 

I will agree it goes a long way but I think there are other factors and circumstances.As I said there are plenty hardworking families out there that are just getting by.

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John Findlay
1 hour ago, Cade said:

Circumstances are very different now than when the "I'm alright jack" crowd grew up.

 

"Work hard" isn't enough any more as there are untold thousands of people in the UK who have a full time job but are still struggling due to the unregulated rental market, utilities cartels and the cost of commuting (especially via train) all combing to ensure that almost every penny earned is handed straight over at the end of every month.

Many families are one small event away from needing to visit a foodbank.

If your oven or fridge breaks down, it's something that has to be replaced right away and this pushes them into debt which takes months to pay off.

 

I grew up relatively poor, growing veg in the back green, going to school with fried potato peelings for a break time snack, never going further than 50 mils away on holiday and even then it was in a caravan borrowed from a family friend. 

But despite these hardships, my parents were actually able to save some money at the end of the month and finally managed to put a deposit down on a house and escaped the rent trap.

In 2019 families with two working parents are still not able to put enough away to save for a deposit due to the housing bubble putting up the cost of a deposit faster than they can save and rising rents meaning they have less they can save each month.

People are trapped forever in a cycle of poverty and just because you remember how you managed to escape it 30-40 years ago does not mean the same escape routes are open today.

 

They are and quite frankly I think you talk alot of Tom Kite. Sadly you blame all and sundry apart from the lazy arseholes that cant be bothered to help themselves. It can be done but for to many its hardwork and they cant be bothered doing that.

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Herbert
52 minutes ago, hughesie27 said:

1 in 3 Edinburgh Kids are living in Poverty. Be willing to bet a large chunk of them come from a house where at least 1 parent is in work.

 

 

See I bet those from poor working families still have all the latest tech. It's about managing money better. Paying  for gas/electricity/food before the brighthouse telly. There are plenty benefits for people on a low income and that's the way it should be. You reward people for working not sitting on their arse all day crying they are poor. 

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doctor jambo
52 minutes ago, vegas-voss said:

I will agree it goes a long way but I think there are other factors and circumstances.As I said there are plenty hardworking families out there that are just getting by.

True, but more resources does not address the deep issues- effort and ethic.

merely pouring resources into somewhere does not change that.

Wages need to rise.

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Jamboelite
32 minutes ago, Herbert said:

 

 

See I bet those from poor working families still have all the latest tech. It's about managing money better. Paying  for gas/electricity/food before the brighthouse telly. There are plenty benefits for people on a low income and that's the way it should be. You reward people for working not sitting on their arse all day crying they are poor. 

I think you dont have a clue what you are talking about, there are families working there arse off on zero hour contracts for pittance trying to manage high rents, increase cost of food, gas, childcare and electricity.

 

There are people starving themselves to make sure their kids get fed.

 

This attitude of people just being lazy cause they cant get out of poverty is ****ing sickening and typical of a selfish “im alright jack” attitude which seems to be much more prevalent these days.

 

Not all in poverty “have the latest tech” **** sake.

 

Tell me how you manage £5 to get your shopping in for your family ? 

Edited by Jamboelite

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Cade

I wondered how long it would before we say the first "MASSIVE TELLIES" shitpost

 

It's a trope that's been destroyed by every real study conducted into the causes of poverty.

Victim blaming at it's very worst.

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Jamboelite
1 minute ago, Cade said:

I wondered how long it would before we say the first "MASSIVE TELLIES" shitpost

 

It's a trope that's been destroyed by every real study conducted into the causes of poverty.

Victim blaming at it's very worst.

Indeed.

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vegas-voss
15 minutes ago, doctor jambo said:

True, but more resources does not address the deep issues- effort and ethic.

merely pouring resources into somewhere does not change that.

Wages need to rise.

I agree

Like most things it's usually a multitude of things need to happen 

Edited by vegas-voss

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John Findlay
9 minutes ago, Cade said:

I wondered how long it would before we say the first "MASSIVE TELLIES" shitpost

 

It's a trope that's been destroyed by every real study conducted into the causes of poverty.

Victim blaming at it's very worst.

About as long as it took you to post. I'm alright Jack brigade. 

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davemclaren
15 minutes ago, Cade said:

I wondered how long it would before we say the first "MASSIVE TELLIES" shitpost

 

It's a trope that's been destroyed by every real study conducted into the causes of poverty.

Victim blaming at it's very worst.

Along the lines of ‘they guys next door are all on benefits and take 5 foreign holidays a year’. 

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vegas-voss
49 minutes ago, Herbert said:

 

 

See I bet those from poor working families still have all the latest tech. It's about managing money better. Paying  for gas/electricity/food before the brighthouse telly. There are plenty benefits for people on a low income and that's the way it should be. You reward people for working not sitting on their arse all day crying they are poor. 

 

article-2260386-16DCA922000005DC-657_634x376.jpg

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Cade

Rising wages only leads to inflation

Rising taxes is how you combat inflation

 

Instead of doing it that way, we can actually address the asset stripping of the nation, the ever-rising cost of living due to profit driven providers of basic services and the out of control rental and housing markts which are kept artificially inflated with taxpayer's money (housing benefit, help to buy, rent to own and many other payments which get shovelled straight into the pockets of landlords and housing developers).

If you can control the cost of living then people have more disposable income and are able to save.

Then you don't need to constantly push wages up and drive inflation.

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3fingersreid

What won’t help those who are desperate to work is the so called  gig economy and zero hour contract jobs and it’ll get worse when jobs at the lower end of the scale are replaced by artificial intelligence.

 I’m a printer to trade , made redundant 14 years ago and done my taxi brief , had to do something as we had two young kids at the time and a mortgage  , however when in the future driverless cars/cabs come into being what will I do ? I’ll ,  throw into that lorry drivers, bus drivers even delivery drivers . Shop staff are replaced by self service tills , even the closure of petrol stations , pubs even bookies are impacting on people’s chances to get employment .

Sadly I think you’ll see more and more people struggling to get employment that covers the expensive place we live in in the future , but not all of them deserve to be accused of being work shy and lazy .

Always help those who have tried to help themselves but can’t , it might be you next .

 

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i8hibsh

Grew up in a police house, my mum had 3 jobs.  she used to go around the pubs at night asking anyone if they needed a cleaner.  I have never wanted for anything, had a fantastic upbringing, wouldn't change a second and now have no time for anyone who use their economic circumstances as excuses further down the line.

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Fourcandles

Must watch this C4 Documentary.

 

Since the thread title is “growing up poor” I guess we’re talking childhood.

IMO growing up poor can be disastrous, awful and scarring, though not always. 

I grew up from very humble beginnings , born in a caravan to wonderful caring, clean, tidy, moral, ethical Nature loving parents.

it was a wonderful childhood growing up in the country - mum didn't work and Dad had a low paid manual job - and though we didn't have money it was a loving and carefree childhood. We were definitely poor.

 

I have by pure luck been imbued with a crazy work ethic and laser like Business sense and am a lunatic risk taker which from humble beginnings has made me a multi millionaire. 

 

However it is a truism to state that any individual persons experience does not prove anything,  pure luck, chance, circumstance and the cerebral hand you are dealt are only a few of a multitude of variables at play.

 

.

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John Findlay
25 minutes ago, Cade said:

Rising wages only leads to inflation

Rising taxes is how you combat inflation

 

Instead of doing it that way, we can actually address the asset stripping of the nation, the ever-rising cost of living due to profit driven providers of basic services and the out of control rental and housing markts which are kept artificially inflated with taxpayer's money (housing benefit, help to buy, rent to own and many other payments which get shovelled straight into the pockets of landlords and housing developers).

If you can control the cost of living then people have more disposable income and are able to save.

Then you don't need to constantly push wages up and drive inflation.

Labour win the next election. Unions in waiting for payback.

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Pasquale for King
1 hour ago, doctor jambo said:

That is pretty much what I said- its about ethic and hard work.

All studies have shown that private education is less important than parental attitude to education.

Not sure how government intervention is going to change mindsets.

All the big, shiny, modern schools and equipment have not budged academic achievement even a FRACTION in the right direction, nor will it.

 

Could you show us these studies please? My mother wanted me to go to university but I didn’t enjoy school at all. I did eventually go to Edinburgh as a mature student but it was through the access course. I’m afraid hard work and your parents attitude doesn’t give you the same opportunities as going to the right schools in the right areas, that’s a fact. 

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Pasquale for King
13 minutes ago, Fourcandles said:

Must watch this C4 Documentary.

 

Since the thread title is “growing up poor” I guess we’re talking childhood.

IMO growing up poor can be disastrous, awful and scarring, though not always. 

I grew up from very humble beginnings , born in a caravan to wonderful caring, clean, tidy, moral, ethical Nature loving parents.

it was a wonderful childhood growing up in the country - mum didn't work and Dad had a low paid manual job - and though we didn't have money it was a loving and carefree childhood. We were definitely poor.

 

I have by pure luck been imbued with a crazy work ethic and laser like Business sense and am a lunatic risk taker which from humble beginnings has made me a multi millionaire. 

 

However it is a truism to state that any individual persons experience does not prove anything,  pure luck, chance, circumstance and the cerebral hand you are dealt are only a few of a multitude of variables at play.

 

.

Great post.

Are you our mystery benefactor? If not why not 😜?

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Jamhammer

Funny I never considered myself poor growing up in the 70’s because me and all my mates lived in identical council houses and rode 2nd hand bikes, wore hand me down clothes and our dads, if present all drove old bangers.

Mentality had changed since then and this poverty voyeur stuff turns my stomach.

Was never hungry, was always warm and loved. Not really poor just skint

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Jamboelite
8 minutes ago, Jamhammer said:

Funny I never considered myself poor growing up in the 70’s because me and all my mates lived in identical council houses and rode 2nd hand bikes, wore hand me down clothes and our dads, if present all drove old bangers.

Mentality had changed since then and this poverty voyeur stuff turns my stomach.

Was never hungry, was always warm and loved. Not really poor just skint

And i think that is important as i grew up

skint not poor which i think will

describe the majority of people when they talk about being poor. 
 

People genuinely starving or unable to pay or afford basic needs despite trying to do all they can are poor.

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doctor jambo
21 minutes ago, Pasquale for King said:

Could you show us these studies please? My mother wanted me to go to university but I didn’t enjoy school at all. I did eventually go to Edinburgh as a mature student but it was through the access course. I’m afraid hard work and your parents attitude doesn’t give you the same opportunities as going to the right schools in the right areas, that’s a fact. 

you misunderstand me

the biggest impact on educational outcomes is parental attitude.

EVen more so than a flashy education.

Of course your educational outcomes are only one part of it- connections made at school being another,

as is deportment, presentation, confidence- all of which the state sector struggle with.

Having been through state school myself (refused a scholarship for Fettes in a moment of madness!) my experience was that being clever was a real drawback, academic excellence made you a target, and people would rather drag you down than build you up.

Private school is the polar opposite- an ethos of success and aspiration.

 

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Herbert
1 hour ago, vegas-voss said:

 

article-2260386-16DCA922000005DC-657_634x376.jpg

 

 

I'm hardly a snob. I just know that it takes hard work to dig yourself out poverty.Those that are unwilling to do that deserve nothing. It wasn't that long ago I struggled to buy a loaf of bread to feed myself. 

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Pasquale for King
2 hours ago, doctor jambo said:

you misunderstand me

the biggest impact on educational outcomes is parental attitude.

EVen more so than a flashy education.

Of course your educational outcomes are only one part of it- connections made at school being another,

as is deportment, presentation, confidence- all of which the state sector struggle with.

Having been through state school myself (refused a scholarship for Fettes in a moment of madness!) my experience was that being clever was a real drawback, academic excellence made you a target, and people would rather drag you down than build you up.

Private school is the polar opposite- an ethos of success and aspiration.

 

Apologies.

My experience at state schools was that the clever and well behaved kids, I was the former, got more attention from teachers especially. Those kids weren’t exactly popular though.

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GinRummy

Well done to anybody who managed to do well for themselves after growing up poor.

 

Looking down your noses and even ‘despising’ those who didn’t, couldn’t or wouldn’t do the same is poor form. 
 

We live in an age where everyone just loves to have an opinion on huge groups of people who are different from them. Whether that’s through nationality, social standing, immigration status or whatever. It’s just stereotyping and easy on the brain, stops having to think too much. Piss poor tbh.

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GinRummy
2 hours ago, Herbert said:

 

 

I'm hardly a snob. I just know that it takes hard work to dig yourself out poverty.Those that are unwilling to do that deserve nothing. It wasn't that long ago I struggled to buy a loaf of bread to feed myself. 


Who are you to say what people deserve? 

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GinRummy
4 hours ago, Cade said:

I wondered how long it would before we say the first "MASSIVE TELLIES" shitpost

 

It's a trope that's been destroyed by every real study conducted into the causes of poverty.

Victim blaming at it's very worst.


No money for food but plenty for tattoos is another well used catch all phrase for the hard of thinking.

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The Mighty Thor
3 hours ago, Jamhammer said:

Funny I never considered myself poor growing up in the 70’s because me and all my mates lived in identical council houses and rode 2nd hand bikes, wore hand me down clothes and our dads, if present all drove old bangers.

Mentality had changed since then and this poverty voyeur stuff turns my stomach.

Was never hungry, was always warm and loved. Not really poor just skint

This pretty much sums up my childhood in the 70s and early 80s. Throw in bouts of strike action and at times things were tough. Luckily my kids have never experienced that. 

 

Watching that last night made me feel sick. Sick and angry. 

I get some of the responses on this thread and some of the reactions. Big tellys, lazy barstewards and all the other stuff, I get it, but we're talking about kids not eating. They don't buy the big telly, they don't have a job to be lazy at.

Kids that don't have food. Kids that don't have heating, sleeping in coats. 

It's a sad indictment of the worlds 6th largest economy. In fact it is ****ing offensive. 

 

 

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Jamhammer
21 minutes ago, The Mighty Thor said:

This pretty much sums up my childhood in the 70s and early 80s. Throw in bouts of strike action and at times things were tough. Luckily my kids have never experienced that. 

 

Watching that last night made me feel sick. Sick and angry. 

I get some of the responses on this thread and some of the reactions. Big tellys, lazy barstewards and all the other stuff, I get it, but we're talking about kids not eating. They don't buy the big telly, they don't have a job to be lazy at.

Kids that don't have food. Kids that don't have heating, sleeping in coats. 

It's a sad indictment of the worlds 6th largest economy. In fact it is ****ing offensive. 

 

 

Totally. I just don’t watch that type of show. It just annoys me and it fuels this Daily Mail/Express “Spongers/Benefit Britain” dynamic. Peddled to divide people and it works

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Icon of Symmetry

As someone said earlier, it’s all quite subjective - poor.

 

I grew up in a council house, we couldn’t afford a lot of non-essentials. When my parents split up, we were even less well off and struggled quite badly. 
 

I am relatively well off now. I’m not rich by any stretch of the imagination, but my wife and I both have good jobs and we are able to do more for our two kids than my Mum was able to do for my sister and I.

 

I have been unemployed before, and it was tough. I’ve had to choose between ‘heating and eating’ when I was younger, and had to ask friends to loan me bus fares to get to work when things got hard.

 

I don’t really regard that as poor though tbh. When you see what some people have gone through, and continue to go through now. Just awful, and you can’t help but feel empathy for them. 
 

I don’t mind paying a bit extra if it means those who are worse off get a a helping hand to get back to a position where they can build themselves up again, or those who are unable to work can live a better life.

 

I don’t see what’s wrong with that, and hate right wing arseholes who would seek to make life harder for people who genuinely are “poor”.

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