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Words you have only heard of recently..


Morgan

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3 hours ago, I P Knightley said:

 

 

It was on an old Stephen Fry edition of QI and the only one I can remember is en suite. The Frenchies don't use that phrase. 

Filthy *******s just piss on the bedroom floor. 

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8 hours ago, Stuart Lyon said:

Conniption - having a fit of rage or hysterics

I've heard Mrs LS use that one. :whistling:      Not clear if she was describing  rage or hysterics though   😉

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19 hours ago, the posh bit said:

 

You're shite. 

 

It takes one to know one, Vince.

 

I hope you don't mind me using just one of your usernames instead of them all?

 

Keep up the shite denial though.  :thumb:

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At work last week a planner used the term exurbia 

 

non plussed I googled to find it ment the area beyond the suburbs 

 

i thought what a twat 

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28 minutes ago, heatonjambo said:

At work last week a planner used the term exurbia 

 

non plussed I googled to find it ment the area beyond the suburbs 

 

i thought what a twat 

I think that this is a good post.  🤷🏿‍♂️

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20 hours ago, Maple Leaf said:

Why do flammable and inflammable mean the same?

both come from latin words inflammare which means to in flame, i.e. to catch fire and flammare meaning to catch fire. both came into english at different times, thus they mean the same thing

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3 minutes ago, milky_26 said:

both come from latin words inflammare which means to in flame, i.e. to catch fire and flammare meaning to catch fire. both came into english at different times, thus they mean the same thing

Google.  👍

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On 13/11/2023 at 15:46, tian447 said:

Quite enjoy one that I only found out about a couple of weeks ago: Syzygy

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syzygy_(astronomy)

 

Doesn't look like it has any business being an English word.  Apparently it's the shortest word that contains 3 Y's. 

 

The only time I’ve come across it was reading about the “Caledonian Anti-Syzygy”.

As you say, it doesn’t look like an English language word.

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23 hours ago, heatonjambo said:

At work last week a planner used the term exurbia 

 

non plussed I googled to find it ment the area beyond the suburbs 

 

i thought what a twat 

Sub-urbia v Ex-urbia 

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26 minutes ago, PortyBeach said:

French equivalent to the British “Tommy”.

Yes, and the American 'doughboy'.  And the Canadian 'Canuck'.

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1 hour ago, PortyBeach said:

French equivalent to the British “Tommy”.

 

1 hour ago, Maple Leaf said:

Yes, and the American 'doughboy'.  And the Canadian 'Canuck'.

 

Thanks, both.  👍

 

I didn’t know about any of this.  

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been here before
10 hours ago, Ulysses said:

Apparently, the collective noun for pugs is a "grumble".

 

Ahhhh a fellow Brain of Britain listener.

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Today, I learned a new French word.  Pissenlit.

 

It means Dandelion and also directly translates to ‘wet the bed’.

 

Feck knows why.  🤷🏿‍♂️

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been here before
1 hour ago, Morgan said:

Today, I learned a new French word.  Pissenlit.

 

It means Dandelion and also directly translates to ‘wet the bed’.

 

Feck knows why.  🤷🏿‍♂️

 

The leaves of the Dandelion can be used as a diuretic. The roots can also be roasted or fried but they're really not that very nice, I tried it during lockdown.

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6 minutes ago, been here before said:

 

The leaves of the Dandelion can be used as a diuretic. The roots can also be roasted or fried but they're really not that very nice, I tried it during lockdown.

Thanks.

 

The worst bit about all of this is that I read your answer out to my wife.

 

She replied 'what's a diuretic'?   :vrface: 

 

Seriously though, these Dandelion leaves were 16.80 Euros a kilo!  They just looked like mushy stems and were covered with earth.

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20 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Thanks.

 

The worst bit about all of this is that I read your answer out to my wife.

 

She replied 'what's a diuretic'?   :vrface: 

 

Seriously though, these Dandelion leaves were 16.80 Euros a kilo!  They just looked like mushy stems and were covered with earth.

They can also be used in a salad, and there's even a dandelion wine.  All taste rotten and all are diuretic.

 

In Scotland we called them "Pee the beds".  To people who care about the appearance of their lawn, they're a monumental pain in the ass weed.

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11 minutes ago, Maple Leaf said:

They can also be used in a salad, and there's even a dandelion wine.  All taste rotten and all are diuretic.

 

In Scotland we called them "Pee the beds".  To people who care about the appearance of their lawn, they're a monumental pain in the ass weed.

:thumb:

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3 hours ago, Morgan said:

Today, I learned a new French word.  Pissenlit.

 

It means Dandelion and also directly translates to ‘wet the bed’.

 

Feck knows why.  🤷🏿‍♂️

Well, “lit” I think means “bed” in French, so from that I think we can deduce what  “piss” “en” “lit” means what you’ve said…

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1 minute ago, PortyBeach said:

Well, “lit” I think means “bed” in French, so from that I think we can deduce what  “piss” “en” “lit” means what you’ve said…

Yes. I got that bit!

 

It's why a dandelion was called that I didn't understand.  :thumbs_up:

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26 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Yes. I got that bit!

 

It's why a dandelion was called that I didn't understand.  :thumbs_up:

🤣 I didn’t see the dandelion reference! Apologies!

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While googling fire blankets today, the word "intumescent" kept appearing.  Never heard of it before.

 

 Apparently it refers to any  material which increases in volume and decreases in density when exposed to heat, and is  used in passive fire protection things like firedoors.

 

Wiki gives the example of  a marshmallow which has been charred over a campfire as being intumescent !!!

 

Who knew, eh  ? 😀

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Lone Striker said:

While googling fire blankets today, the word "intumescent" kept appearing.  Never heard of it before.

 

 Apparently it refers to any  material which increases in volume and decreases in density when exposed to heat, and is  used in passive fire protection things like firedoors.

 

Wiki gives the example of  a marshmallow which has been charred over a campfire as being intumescent !!!

 

Who knew, eh  ? 😀

 

 

I did. I replaced all the intumescent strips in the fire doors in my work just after lockdown when lots of people were working from home. 

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46 minutes ago, Tazio said:

I did. I replaced all the intumescent strips in the fire doors in my work just after lockdown when lots of people were working from home. 

:beer::2thumbsup:

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  • 1 month later...
On 16/11/2023 at 16:42, Morgan said:

Thanks.

 

The worst bit about all of this is that I read your answer out to my wife.

 

She replied 'what's a diuretic'?   :vrface: 

 

Seriously though, these Dandelion leaves were 16.80 Euros a kilo!  They just looked like mushy stems and were covered with earth.

The word dandelion is one of these lazy English language corruptions of a slang French name for  the plant. 

 

 Dents-de-Lion    Literally,  lion's teeth ........ presumably because of the shape of the leaves.

 

 

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On 13/11/2023 at 02:20, Ulysses said:

Woohoo!  I just met the words "augend" and "addend".  :laugh: 

 

See the sum 2+3?

 

The first number in a sum (in this case 2) is an "augend".  The second number (in this case 3) is the "addend".  

 

You'll be happy to know that subtraction also has names for each part.

The three parts of any subtraction problem are the minuend, the part you start with; the subtrahend, the part being taken away; and the difference, the part left over.

Ditto division and multiplication.

There are three main parts to a division problem: the dividend, the divisor, and the quotient. The dividend is the number that will be divided. The divisor is the number of “people” that the number is being divided among. The quotient is the answer.
The parts of a multiplication sentence are the multiplicand, multiplier, and product. The multiplicand is the first number, the multiplier is the second number, and the product is the answer.

 

Apologies for the patronising tone but I just C&P-ed them and haven't unchilded the explanations :lol: 

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Costermonger is a word I only learned today.  It's not commonly used now, and means a street seller of fruit and vegetables. An older version of the word is costardmonger, and it comes from the word costard, which means (or meant) cooking apple.

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Read an article today about the writer Hanif Kureishi   (My Beautiful Laundrette), who suffered some brain damage & paralysis resulting from a freak fall.   

 

Fascinating article about how this  has influenced his life. He needs round the clock care to help with physical disabilities,  but his brain is clearly still very active  & alert.    One of the words he used to describe  his dearest wish to be able to walk  into his house  once again was  interregnum -  meaning a gap or period of discontinuity.  Its from 2  Latin words, literally meaning "between the reign of kings"

 

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1 minute ago, Boof said:

 

You'll be happy to know that subtraction also has names for each part.

The three parts of any subtraction problem are the minuend, the part you start with; the subtrahend, the part being taken away; and the difference, the part left over.

Ditto division and multiplication.

There are three main parts to a division problem: the dividend, the divisor, and the quotient. The dividend is the number that will be divided. The divisor is the number of “people” that the number is being divided among. The quotient is the answer.
The parts of a multiplication sentence are the multiplicand, multiplier, and product. The multiplicand is the first number, the multiplier is the second number, and the product is the answer.

 

Apologies for the patronising tone but I just C&P-ed them and haven't unchilded the explanations :lol: 

 

More new words.  I'll add those subtractions to my files.  :laugh:

 

I knew the components for multiplication and division already.  I think a lot of people know those, whereas the addition and subtraction components aren't well-known.

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32 minutes ago, Boof said:

 

You'll be happy to know that subtraction also has names for each part.

The three parts of any subtraction problem are the minuend, the part you start with; the subtrahend, the part being taken away; and the difference, the part left over.

Ditto division and multiplication.

There are three main parts to a division problem: the dividend, the divisor, and the quotient. The dividend is the number that will be divided. The divisor is the number of “people” that the number is being divided among. The quotient is the answer.
The parts of a multiplication sentence are the multiplicand, multiplier, and product. The multiplicand is the first number, the multiplier is the second number, and the product is the answer.

 

Apologies for the patronising tone but I just C&P-ed them and haven't unchilded the explanations :lol: 

Interesting find there, Boof.   2 of your  examples (subtraction &  division) seem a bit more  deserving of   differently named elements than addition & multiplication  do, since it doesn't matter in what order you perform these last 2  operations.

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