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Patrick James Crossan


JudyJudyJudy

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Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

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9 minutes ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

Thanks for this. Amazing.

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11 minutes ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

What an amazing story ♥️thanks for posting mate.

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9 minutes ago, TheBigO said:

Thanks for this. Amazing.

 

6 minutes ago, One five said:

What an amazing story ♥️thanks for posting mate.

 

4 minutes ago, Roxy Hearts said:

What a great story. Thanks for posting. 👍

No bother , yes it’s an amazing inspiring story . 

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Go for it 1308

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45 minutes ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

Brilliant story 👏 

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5 minutes ago, Rocky jamboa said:

Enjoyed that... amongst all the doom and gloom on here! It certainly puts things into perspective.

Yes that’s one of the reason I thought I’d post it 👍

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1 hour ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

Thanks for that JJJ, what an absolute legend of a man. Brilliant story.

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1 minute ago, Pans Jambo said:

Thanks for that JJJ, what an absolute legend of a man. Brilliant story.

👍 it was from another social media outlet . I didn’t compose it but felt it be great to share to the forum 

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6 minutes ago, bairdy said:

Thanks for posting that James.

Remarkable story about a remarkable man.

Used to go to 'Paddy's bar' in my teens.

Had some good times there.

Yes shame it was ruined 

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2 hours ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

Thanks James that was an inspiring read. 

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millerjames398
2 hours ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

That was an amazing read..thanks for sharing that story👍🏼🇱🇻🇱🇻🇱🇻

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3 hours ago, Morgan said:

@PaddysBar

 

Are you seeing this, Barney?


I am chief. A great read, love the tales of the old Hearts players. 
 

I was Isaac Begbie on the original forum, then we all had to re-register (2007 I think), then I was Barney Battles until last year 👍 

 

John McCartney was an amazing guy as well. Held that team together and thought of them all as his sons. 
 

The package he sent to the front to the players was incredible, soap, football, socks, razors etc. it was detailed in full in Jack Alexander’s book. 

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Just as an aside:-

 

The Cumberland Bar ...


The Cumberland Bar has been a long established favourite public house and restaurant in Edinburgh's New Town.  In previous times, the bar was known as "The Tilted Wig", owned and operated by the well known Paddy Crossan. During his ownership the bar became a frequent lunchtime and evening stop for the areas lawyers, judges and other professional inhabitants.

 

👆 as lifted from 👇

 

https://www.cumberlandbar.co.uk/about

 

 

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Go for it 1308
5 hours ago, JudyJudyJudy said:

Amazing Story 

 

𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐧


  - Heart of Midlothian 1911-1925.

Patrick James Crossan, known as "Paddy"to the press but "Pat" to his friends, was born on 1893 in the shale mining village of Addiewell, Midlothian.
His footballing career began with Junior side Arniston Rangers. Paddy was an explosive talent, a quick, robust, industrious full-back and his displays brought him to the attention of the Hearts manager, John McCartney. Crossan signed for Hearts in 1911 and soon became a regular in the Hearts side. 


He was a handsome and charismatic character and was very popular with his team mates who took to calling him "the handsomest man in the world". Mischievously, Paddy did not dispute this and was happy to have that title bestowed on him. One of his playing colleagues informed a journalist "Pat can pass the ball, but he couldn't pass a mirror if he tried".


Life was good for the young man playing the game he loved but like so many others from that time, the outbreak of the Great War interrupted his footballing  career.


In November 1914, along with other members of the Hearts team, he volunteered to serve his country and joined the 16th Royal Scots - McCrae's Battalion. On completion of military training the regiment were sent to the Western Front.


On the morning of 1st July 1916 the Battle of the Somme got underway and the 16th Royal Scots went "over the top" at 7.30am. 


The Somme was intended to be a major breakthrough in the war, instead it became a byword for indiscriminate slaughter.


As they advanced over "no man's land" towards the enemy lines, the Germans opened up with deadly fire. 
Crossan was running forward when a shell exploded in front of him causing a massive hole. He went down in to the shell-hole and lay unconscious, covered with earth and debris. Paddy regained consciousness the following day and although badly concussed he  painstakingly crawled for three days towards the British lines before he was found and taken to a dressing station and treated and then returned to his unit.


Paddy's vision had been impaired as a result of the concussion, but it had not affected his memory as he recounted his remarkable journey back to his lines and the horror he had encountered while crawling from shell-hole to shell-hole: holes that were occupied by countless corpses and the remains of bodies. On learning the fate of his colleagues, Crossan knew that he was one lucky young man to be alive. Then it was back to the trenches.


A few weeks later a shell exploded near to Paddy Crossan, resulting in some pieces of shell becoming embedded in his left leg. A shard of shell casing also penetrated his left foot, almost taking off his toes. He was removed to to a field hospital where he lost consciousness. When he came round again, Paddy noticed that a label had been pinned to his uniform. The label contained the message "for amputation". The doctors had decreed that his left leg was coming off.
Then fate stepped in, in the unlikely shape of a German. A captured German soldier had been put to work in the hospital as an orderly but in reality he had been a surgeon in Germany before the war. The German informed the medical staff that amputation was not necessary as a simple operation would suffice and that he was prepared to carry it out. Remarkably, permission was granted and the kindly enemy surgeon carried out the operation successfully.
Paddy was transferred  to Stourbridge Hospital in the West Midlands to recover and it was from there that he wrote to his manager John McCartney. With typical self- belief, he confidently informed the manager that he would soon be kicking a ball again. It was Crossan at his best- you just couldn't keep him down.


After recovering from his injuries it was once more back to the fray and Paddy was sent to the Middle East with the 4th Royal Scots to take part in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. After experiencing action at the Battle of Jerusalem in 1917, he returned to the Western Front for the final weeks of the war where tragically he was gassed by the Germans. 
Paddy was transported back to Edinburgh to receive further treatment in hospital. 


On 11th November 1918, the day that the guns eventually fell silent, Paddy received a visit from one of his friends who enquired as to his well being. Paddy pointed out the hospital window and said "see that hill ower there. I'll be running up and doon it in a couple of weeks and then I'll be back at Tynecastle playing for the Hearts". The hill he was referring to was Arthur's Seat.


On 11th January 1919 Paddy Crossan led the Hearts team onto the field at Tynecastle for a League match against Hibernian. One can only wonder as to his thoughts as the team's lined up. He had quite literally been to hell and back and here he was back on his old stamping ground again, something I'm certain that even Paddy could not have envisaged given his experiences.
He made a remarkable recovery from all the injuries he sustained and remained a first-choice defender for Hearts until the end of season 1924-25. He played for Leith Athletic for a short time before retiring from the game.


In 1926 Crossan married Alice Wattie, the sister of his former teammate Harry, who had been killed at the Somme on 1st July 1916.


He opened his famous Paddy's Bar in Rose Street, Edinburgh and liked nothing better than to have a "good blether" with the patrons who frequented it. Paddy had many tales to tell.


On 28th April 1933 Paddy Crossan passed away at Southfield Sanatorium, Liberton at the age of thirty-nine years, due in no small measure to his wartime injuries. 


On the day of his funeral, a huge crowd turned out at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, to pay their respects and say farewell to one of Heart of Midlothian's most wholehearted players and the "handsomest man in the world".

It was said that he liked a "small refreshment or two"; if ever a man deserved to partake of a wee drink, it was Patrick James Crossan.

 

God bless him 🙏

I've just read this for a second time...brought a lump to my throat 😢

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The White Cockade
13 minutes ago, Wee Mikey said:

Just as an aside:-

 

The Cumberland Bar ...


The Cumberland Bar has been a long established favourite public house and restaurant in Edinburgh's New Town.  In previous times, the bar was known as "The Tilted Wig", owned and operated by the well known Paddy Crossan. During his ownership the bar became a frequent lunchtime and evening stop for the areas lawyers, judges and other professional inhabitants.

 

👆 as lifted from 👇

 

https://www.cumberlandbar.co.uk/about

 

 

aye Paddy’s son also Paddy had the Tilted Wig and Cumberland Bar

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Brilliant read. 

 

I love reading stories about heroic and courageous men and women who served in the 1st and 2nd WW. 

 

What life must've been like and what they went through. Totally different breed of people.

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