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Differences between the USA and the UK


Captain Slog

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Seymour M Hersh
3 minutes ago, Locky said:

(although Cadbury is pretty shite these days) 

 

 

 

Did Hershey not buy Cadbury? Might explain why it's shite nowadays. 

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3 hours ago, Justin Z said:

 

One thing that is hard to break down into parts is just the complete lack of cultural awareness that you first enter a new country with. A silly example: as I was self-educating on culture/history here, I did a lot of reading, so I often didn't know how to pronounce things until told. Jock "Stine" and Jimmy "Sav-eel" are two that immediately come to mind. Place names are hard enough as it is. :lol: I think it's a bit like learning new English words as a non-native English speaker, since you can't rely on spelling to give you a for-sure pronunciation.

 

I am from the Southwest US so I miss really good Mexican-inspired food (not burrito places). I actually brought a dozen cans of green chiles back over at one point, and I put a roasting joint in my instant pot along with chipotle paste and other spices to make barbacoa. Presumably Lupe Pintos in Tollcross will be a source of great comfort for Dorothy.

 

Kalamazoo pointed out an excellent one: seems to me like everything in the UK has sugar in it possibly even worse than the US, and baked beans are an excellent example of that. If you have baked beans in the States they're not sweetened, so yes, if you want sweet, they're barbecue sauce flavoured. I wish I could get just plain, savoury baked beans to have on toast, because I've never been much of a fan of the mixing savoury and sweet at breakfast thing either, even given where I come from. But I can't get away from sugar-laden beans here. :smile:

 

Actually Kalamazoo's list was superb. The first time I had diluting juice I took a swig of it as-is because this concept was entirely foreign to me :lol: I've not found Polish pickles here that hold a candle to Vlasic pickles in the States.

 

Cheese melts markedly different here—my nachos are not nearly as good as when I make them in Arizona. And I don't mean fake American cheese! :wink: I mean cheddar. It becomes rubbery here, where cheddar in the US becomes pleasingly gooey.

 

Guacamole should never, ever, contain cream, but all the store-bought ones do here, so unless you make your own it's pretty awful, and even then it's not great because avocados are tragic here. It's also hard to find decent tortilla chips.

 

 

 

I've no idea why, but for the first time I've read this post with an internal American accent 😂😂

 

I've never read any of your other posts like that 

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3 minutes ago, Locky said:

I'll have you know that I think Hershey's bars are ****ing tidy! Growing up, it was probably the only American sweet that I saw in shops so it was pretty exotic to me. I get why folk might not like them, especially compared to British chocolate (although Cadbury is pretty shite these days) but I love the flavour. Sadly, plain Hershey bars are quite rare in the shops these days. Only seems to be the Cookie ones I see. I did a wee while ago however, have a mint choc chip one. ****ing tidy!

 

Never tried the syrup though. I live next to a big Tesco so will keep an eye out.

 

Hah I'm honestly shocked. Hershey's always tastes like chalk chocolate to me. The plain bars with almonds are at least slightly more palatable :thumbsup:

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Auld Reekin'
1 hour ago, Justin Z said:

Sneaking a bottle of spirits over won't go amiss either. I brought a bottle of salted caramel... whisky 

 

:berra: :jj_facepalm::muggy:

 

Prefer whisky flavour myself...

Edited by Auld Reekin'
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Just now, Taffin said:

I've no idea why, but for the first time I've read this post with an internal American accent 😂😂

 

I've never read any of your other posts like that 

 

That's especially funny to me seeing as I narrate audiobooks and do other voiceover work as a hobby. :lol:

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9 minutes ago, Auld Reekin' said:

 

:berra: :jj_facepalm::muggy:

 

Prefer whisky flavour myself...

 

The spirit from here has never done much for me. Much prefer a bourbon or Canadian whisky (they do spell it without the 'e' too, fwiw). The one I brought over is very smooth, very easy to drink, nothing like drinking smoke, or a fen.

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Auld Reekin'
4 minutes ago, Justin Z said:

 

The spirit from here has never done much for me. Much prefer a bourbon or Canadian whisky (they do spell it without the 'e' too, fwiw). The one I brought over is very smooth, very easy to drink, nothing like drinking smoke, or a fen.

 

Ah well, all the more for the rest of us!   :thumbsup:

 

Can't drink the ultra-smoky, heavily-peated, ones these days either. Has to be a soft and sweetish Lowland or Speyside for me.

 

Whilst on the topic, can you recommend a good rye whisk(e)y?

Edited by Auld Reekin'
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NANOJAMBO
13 hours ago, Tazio said:

One of the biggest things I’ve found on visits to the US is food. You order something with the same name as something here and it just isn’t. Bizarrely I’ve never really had good Italian food in the states despite the big Italian community. It’s like over the years it’s been diluted and further from the original recipes. You get quite alarmed the first time you order something with a tomato sauce and it’s bright orange and almost sweet. Also decent Indian food in the states is like rocking horse shit. It just doesn’t exist. 

So much this. My sister kicked off in an Italian restaurant over there to the point the chef came out. She told him what the dish SHOULD look like and it shouldn't be drowned in tomayto sauce. He actually agreed but said Americans don't really know what Italian food is & expect it to be served in an American style. She asked him to make it how he would do it for himself - guy couldn't believe anyone would want it. 

 

US restaurants are generally pretty poor IMO (steak, mash & sweetcorn) - that's if you can find one amongst the overwhelming presence of the main chains (and I don't mean McDs or BK).

 

American "mustard" , "butter" and "cheese" are atrocities. 

 

"You want cream for you coffee ?"

"I want some milk".

"It is milk !".

WTF ? 

 

Take outs where you pay by the weight of the box (reminds me of France when you pay for posh gateaux slices by weight). 

 

"Did you enjoy your meal sir ?"

"It was lovely".

"What does that mean? I never heard someone say that before". 

 

"Can I have a beer ?"

"You got ID ?"

" I'm 57 !!!"

" I need to see ID"

"Ram it". 

 

Restaurants aside,  the US & it's people are a fascinating experience. 

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Awbdy Oot
2 hours ago, Rodger Mellie said:

Remind your wife it’s trousers and not pants. I lived in the USA for 10 years and refuse to call trousers pants.

 

Might be worth pointing out that her arse is not her fannny, that is something else. 😁

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14 minutes ago, Auld Reekin' said:

 

Ah well, all the more for the rest of us!   :thumbsup:

 

Can't drink the ultra-smoky, heavily-peated, ones these days either. Has to be a soft and sweetish Lowland or Speyside for me.

 

Tbf those would do me just fine, but the aficionados where I come from are never after those!

 

14 minutes ago, Auld Reekin' said:

Whilst on the topic, can you recommend a good rye whisk(e)y?

 

I can't claim to be a connoisseur but I have heard that Bulleit is quite decent and is not too expensive.

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NANOJAMBO
1 minute ago, graygo said:

 

Might be worth pointing out that her arse is not her fannny, that is something else. 😁

Reminds me of being in a pub in Edinburgh with an American school mate when a fit bird walked in and he shouted out "look at the ***** on that!". I thought we were all going to die. 

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Auld Reekin'
5 minutes ago, Justin Z said:

 

Tbf those would do me just fine, but the aficionados where I come from are never after those!

 

 

I can't claim to be a connoisseur but I have heard that Bulleit is quite decent and is not too expensive.

 

Thanks.

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22 minutes ago, NANOJAMBO said:

So much this. My sister kicked off in an Italian restaurant over there to the point the chef came out. She told him what the dish SHOULD look like and it shouldn't be drowned in tomayto sauce. He actually agreed but said Americans don't really know what Italian food is & expect it to be served in an American style. She asked him to make it how he would do it for himself - guy couldn't believe anyone would want it. 

 

US restaurants are generally pretty poor IMO (steak, mash & sweetcorn) - that's if you can find one amongst the overwhelming presence of the main chains (and I don't mean McDs or BK).

 

American "mustard" , "butter" and "cheese" are atrocities. 

 

"You want cream for you coffee ?"

"I want some milk".

"It is milk !".

WTF ? 

 

Take outs where you pay by the weight of the box (reminds me of France when you pay for posh gateaux slices by weight). 

 

"Did you enjoy your meal sir ?"

"It was lovely".

"What does that mean? I never heard someone say that before". 

 

"Can I have a beer ?"

"You got ID ?"

" I'm 57 !!!"

" I need to see ID"

"Ram it". 

 

Restaurants aside,  the US & it's people are a fascinating experience. 

I’ve had some fantastic meals in American restaurants to be fair, just not when ordering something I know already. And if I lived in New York I’d get fat very quickly on takeaway pizza slices. 
Outwith the big city chain restaurants you can also get good genuine friendly service and not just tip hunting. I remember stopping at a truck stop type place in the middle of the desert and amazingly the standard type 24 page A4 sized menu didn’t have a single dish without meat in it apart from a cheese omelette, which didn’t amuse my vegetarian wife much. So I asked the waitress if that was it and she asked us to wait a minute. After popping to the kitchen she came back and asked her if she liked Mexican food and the kitchen staff would make her something not on the menu. She ended up with an amazing huge  plate of fresh Mexican food that made me and the other 3 or 4 people in the place jealous as we had all ordered off the bland menu. Then to top it off just charged her $5 for it. 

Edited by Tazio
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Sawdust Caesar

When watching a commercial tv channel we don't have adverts every 5 or so minutes. I was watching an episode of Frasier in the States I couldn't believe the amount of ad breaks there were. They had an advert in between the end of the show and the little silent skit they always did when the credits rolled, which only lasts about 20 seconds. 

 

I know they spell some words differently, like colour, but lately, while watching CNN, I've noticed they spell cancelled and travelled with 1 L, has that always been the case?

 

As has been mentioned we call pants trousers and ***** is an arse, others to add are:-

 

Flat = Apartment

Pavement = Sidewalk

Lift = Elevator

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Joey J J Jr Shabadoo

You can't seem to get fresh cream in the US, I've only seen UHT cream or the stuff that comes out of an aerosol can. No creme fraiche, either.

There cheese also only seems to be Monterey Jack (which I like) or, again, out of an aerosol can.

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NANOJAMBO
1 minute ago, Tazio said:

I’ve had some fantastic meals in American restaurants to be fair, just not when ordering something I know already. And if I loved in New York I’d get fat very quickly on takeaway pizza slices. 
 

Agreed & I agree with your comments about NYC. I've had fantastic Mexican food (and a free beer off the owner for my compliments to the chef) in S Calif and amazing pulled pork type stuff, seafood in Florida that was WAY better than here (and it was Italian 😄)   But in the main I find it a pretty drab experience. 

 

I also think Americans are generally tight with their money, always trying to scam something, get a free something or other. Americans & "coupons"  :facepalm:

 

But I can't help liking Americans for their kindness of spirit & warm welcome. 

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heartsfc_fan

Paying for dinner in the US is always odd. They take your card away and swipe it. Obscene.

Then you write what tip you want on the "check" (receipt) after.

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1 hour ago, Seymour M Hersh said:

 

Did Hershey not buy Cadbury? Might explain why it's shite nowadays. 

I think Cadbury are owned by Kraft now.

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Konrad von Carstein
3 hours ago, Justin Z said:

 

Relish, peanut butter (absolute nightmare to find peanut butter without sugar or palm oil in it over here), beans, the list goes on. I rarely eat white bread, but I'll take your word for it on that one. :thumbsup:

 

Another one is crisps. There are such different flavours over here. "Chicken" or "beef" or "steak" flavoured crisps would be eyed with suspicion in the States. So would "cheese and onion" for that matter, even though we do "sour cream and chives" ourselves.

 

I've never had good pre-bottled chocolate milk here. Dorothy, if you like Hershey's Syrup (as opposed to the chocolate bars which yes Scottish folk, we know they're rank, but Hershey's Syrup is brilliant), you should bring some over—or I've seen it in the big Tescos sometimes.

 

I hope you end up really liking Irn Bru, and fish and chips with chippy sauce, and the way Chinese takeaways make their food (it's much different).

 

Sneaking a bottle of spirits over won't go amiss either. I brought a bottle of salted caramel Canadian whisky and haven't found its like for sale anywhere in the UK, except for silly prices like £60+ (it cost me about £11), so that's pretty cool. :smile:

Naw it's no... Where are you shopping for flips sake?

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Konrad von Carstein
1 hour ago, NANOJAMBO said:

So much this. My sister kicked off in an Italian restaurant over there to the point the chef came out. She told him what the dish SHOULD look like and it shouldn't be drowned in tomayto sauce. He actually agreed but said Americans don't really know what Italian food is & expect it to be served in an American style. She asked him to make it how he would do it for himself - guy couldn't believe anyone would want it. 

 

US restaurants are generally pretty poor IMO (steak, mash & sweetcorn) - that's if you can find one amongst the overwhelming presence of the main chains (and I don't mean McDs or BK).

 

American "mustard" , "butter" and "cheese" are atrocities. 

 

"You want cream for you coffee ?"

"I want some milk".

"It is milk !".

WTF ? 

 

Take outs where you pay by the weight of the box (reminds me of France when you pay for posh gateaux slices by weight). 

 

"Did you enjoy your meal sir ?"

"It was lovely".

"What does that mean? I never heard someone say that before". 

 

"Can I have a beer ?"

"You got ID ?"

" I'm 57 !!!"

" I need to see ID"

"Ram it". 

 

Restaurants aside,  the US & it's people are a fascinating experience. 

Happened to me in Target in Chicago, I was there for my 50th, not an embarrasing experience at all :( Passport was in the hotel room safe and they wouldn't take any other proof of age, twits...

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Byyy The Light

I spent 10 weeks on the West coast coaching football one summer, absolutely loved it. Moved around on a weekly basis and lived with the families of the players I was coaching.  Spent time in the Bay area, San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pasadena, Napa, Oakland amongst others.

 

The language subtleties took me a while to get to grips with.  Americans don't seem to know what a queue or surname is. My accent didn't help either obviously but spent most of my time staring at blank faces where you could tell they hadn't a clue what I was on about.

 

Used to have a bit of fun with the teams or groups I had, I had to use the American terms for football related stuff and they had to use the proper terms (football/soccer, water/wadder, boots/cleats, pitch/field, scrimmage/game etc).  When either of us messed up we'd put stupid forfeits in, great times and was made to feel very welcome.

 

The whole hospitality experience also takes a bit of getting used to. Tipping culture generally but when and how much for certain things like every time you buy a drink in a bar/pub.  Complete minefield if you are new to it and don't have anyone to explain it to you.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Konrad von Carstein said:

Naw it's no... Where are you shopping for flips sake?

 

Fair play to you. :lol: Smaller "express" type shops in general, as it's a hike to get to the big Sainsbury's that's in the area, but even when I've been in a big Tesco or that I've had to hunt / get lucky.

 

This peanut butter is the absolute best and its ingredients are just peanuts and salt. I've found a foo-foo organic one here that I just add salt to—not ideal, and silly price because of the organic marketing scam shite, but it is what it is.

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Seymour M Hersh
27 minutes ago, Locky said:

I think Cadbury are owned by Kraft now.

 

You're correct under their new name of Mondalez sic). Hershey got to make Cadbury products under licence back in the 80's hence my confusion. 

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Konrad von Carstein
9 minutes ago, Justin Z said:

 

Fair play to you. :lol: Smaller "express" type shops in general, as it's a hike to get to the big Sainsbury's that's in the area, but even when I've been in a big Tesco or that I've had to hunt / get lucky.

 

This peanut butter is the absolute best and its ingredients are just peanuts and salt. I've found a foo-foo organic one here that I just add salt to—not ideal, and silly price because of the organic marketing scam shite, but it is what it is.

Am no hunting down links for peanut butter as its an occasional indulgence but I think the brand we buy from Tesco is Meridian... Love it on a bit of celery 😬

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1 hour ago, graygo said:

 

Might be worth pointing out that her arse is not her fannny, that is something else. 😁

 

23 minutes ago, Seymour M Hersh said:

 

You're correct under their new name of Mondalez sic). Hershey got to make Cadbury products under licence back in the 80's hence my confusion. 

As I understand it, Mondelez own Cadbury's but Hershey's has the US licence. 

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4 hours ago, Justin Z said:

I've never had good pre-bottled chocolate milk here. Dorothy, if you like Hershey's Syrup (as opposed to the chocolate bars which yes Scottish folk, we know they're rank, but Hershey's Syrup is brilliant), you should bring some over—or I've seen it in the big Tescos sometimes.

I wouldn't have ever thought of that. Hersey's syrup is amazing, chocolate and strawberry. I'll have to bring some.

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The Real Maroonblood
1 hour ago, Sawdust Caesar said:

When watching a commercial tv channel we don't have adverts every 5 or so minutes. I was watching an episode of Frasier in the States I couldn't believe the amount of ad breaks there were. They had an advert in between the end of the show and the little silent skit they always did when the credits rolled, which only lasts about 20 seconds. 

 

I know they spell some words differently, like colour, but lately, while watching CNN, I've noticed they spell cancelled and travelled with 1 L, has that always been the case?

 

As has been mentioned we call pants trousers and ***** is an arse, others to add are:-

 

Flat = Apartment

Pavement = Sidewalk

Lift = Elevator

Give way = yield 

mobile phone = cell phone 

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Captain Slog
16 minutes ago, Dorothy said:

I wouldn't have ever thought of that. Hersey's syrup is amazing, chocolate and strawberry. I'll have to bring some.

You aren't setting foot in our house if you bring Hershey's - its disgusting

 

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NANOJAMBO

In Vegas when the street hustlers are trying to get you to take their cards for hookers* but they're not allowed to talk to you. We got sick of this after a few days and eventually my son took one of the cards (we were waiting at a pedestrian crossing) and my lad looked at the guy and said " there in 30 minutes or she's free, right " ?  Crowd started laughing but the guy wasn't. 😄

 

Made me furious as  we had the entire family with us. :angry:

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NANOJAMBO
16 minutes ago, The Real Maroonblood said:

Give way = yield 

mobile phone = cell phone 

Originally called cell phones in the UK as it worked on "cell" technology. BT developed it.

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Maple Leaf
12 hours ago, Captain Slog said:

Minister?   Nah, that can't be right with how naughty you were in the bedroom.

 

:Shoosh: TMI

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The Real Maroonblood
2 minutes ago, NANOJAMBO said:

Originally called cell phones in the UK as it worked on "cell" technology. BT developed it.

👍

Cell phone seem the proper description. 

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8 minutes ago, Captain Slog said:

You aren't setting foot in our house if you bring Hershey's - its disgusting

 

It's not the same...promise! It's actually tolerable in syrup form.

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Maple Leaf

The local Edinburgh dialect can take some getting used to.

 

Whenever any of my Canadian-born family are back, hearing two locals having a conversation always raises eyebrows. To be blunt, they think the folk are speaking in a foreign language.

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Auld Reekin'
1 hour ago, Joey J J Jr Shabadoo said:

You can't seem to get fresh cream in the US, I've only seen UHT cream or the stuff that comes out of an aerosol can. No creme fraiche, either.

There cheese also only seems to be Monterey Jack (which I like) or, again, out of an aerosol can.

 

F.F.S...   :jj_facepalm::muggy:     :Icky:

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Joey J J Jr Shabadoo
Just now, Auld Reekin' said:

 

F.F.S...   :jj_facepalm::muggy:     :Icky:

My cousin is amazed by our cheese selection. Although his wife wondered WTF was on her natchos when she saw it wasn't out of a can. 😂

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2 hours ago, Justin Z said:

 

The spirit from here has never done much for me. Much prefer a bourbon or Canadian whisky (they do spell it without the 'e' too, fwiw). The one I brought over is very smooth, very easy to drink, nothing like drinking smoke, or a fen.

 

You should try Glayva

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Captain Slog
17 minutes ago, Auld Reekin' said:

 

F.F.S...   :jj_facepalm::muggy:     :Icky:

Do we still get Primula here?  I can't recall seeing it

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3 hours ago, Auld Reekin' said:

 

Ah well, all the more for the rest of us!   :thumbsup:

 

Can't drink the ultra-smoky, heavily-peated, ones these days either. Has to be a soft and sweetish Lowland or Speyside for me.

 

Whilst on the topic, can you recommend a good rye whisk(e)y?

Forty Creek Barrel Select is a very popular Rye Whisky with my friends who indulge in rye!

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Auld Reekin'
19 minutes ago, Captain Slog said:

Do we still get Primula here?  I can't recall seeing it

 

Yep, think so - not that I ever buy it or have bought it.

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Auld Reekin'
5 minutes ago, gator said:

Forty Creek Barrel Select is a very popular Rye Whisky with my friends who indulge in rye!

 

Cheers!   🥃

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We don't have stupid rules like which side of the pavement you have to walk on (some places stateside don't allow you to walk with/or against traffic) and no such thing as being fined for jaywalking.

 

We have no equivalent to iHop for breakfast

 

People judge on which supermarket someone uses (there is more variety than just Walmart) and will be required to pay for a bag that you then have to pack yourself

 

You will get more than 4 weeks paid leave from work each year

 

A large drink from the likes of McDonalds is a medium in the US, regular is what americans would put in a kids meal

 

We don't have plug sockets in the bathroom

 

Majority of non-essential shops operate the same working hours as you do so things like clothes shopping need to be done during lunch or at weekends (or online)

 

Wardrobes (closets) are not commonly built-in and you have to buy your own

 

'To go' bags and cups are not a done thing here

 

Eggs aren't in the fridge at supermarkets

 

Wages get paid monthly rather than bi-weekly

 

 

 

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I can imagine the difficulties moving from North America to Scotland, my wife did but settled in quite rapidly. Canadians use a lot of American words or phrases. When I first arrived and had a job in a Department store you had to punch a clock so there was a constant flow of persons heading or leaving the clock area, as I walked in I said Hello to everyone, I became conscious of people waiting for me to arrive and the giggle and outright laughter at my Hellos. A nice girl stopped me and said we don't say hello in the morning like you do, we say good morning but more often the more casual Hi. 

 

Writing police reports was a whole new experience,junctions became intersections, pavement became sidewalk, cars became automobiles, lefts and rights became more compass directions, distances travelled on city roads became blocks,petrol of course became gas, trousers yes became pants, ie, accused was wearing a windbreaker and pants. Because a lot of our and my own personal connections evolved with American policemen , I am by habit inclined to use American spelling, as a Police Department it was used quite widely also. Asking for a "burger and chips  caused a glazed look, chips being here crisps, its funny we are all described as English speakers but sometimes especilly when starting a new life that is a bit of a mystery.

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Auld Reekin'
41 minutes ago, Ribble said:

We don't have stupid rules like which side of the pavement you have to walk on (some places stateside don't allow you to walk with/or against traffic) and no such thing as being fined for jaywalking.

 

Once witnessed a German guy going nuts in James Thin's bookshop because people (a rather bemused, elderly, local couple) were walking "the wrong way" up the stairs! He finished his rant by shouting: "It's anarchy here - total anarchy...!".  :taz:  

 

I assume he'd reached the end of his Teutonic tether over the random way Scottish people used the pavements, corridors, and staircases, the poor chap...   :biggrin:

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17 minutes ago, Auld Reekin' said:

 

Once witnessed a German guy going nuts in James Thin's bookshop because people (a rather bemused, elderly, local couple) were walking "the wrong way" up the stairs! He finished his rant by shouting: "It's anarchy here - total anarchy...!".  :taz:  

 

I assume he'd reached the end of his Teutonic tether over the random way Scottish people used the pavements, corridors, and staircases, the poor chap...   :biggrin:

I got torn up for arsepaper by a policewoman in Monterey as I’d parked for a minute facing oncoming traffic as my wife had left her sunglasses in our hotel room and wanted to pop back in for them. My defence of sorry I didn’t realise just seemed to make her even more furious. The result being instead of a minute facing the wrong way it was closer to five by the time she’d used me as a punchbag for whatever was going wrong in her life. She wouldn’t even let us get back in the car until she’d finished making me feel like the cause of death on the roads of California. 

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Auld Reekin'
2 minutes ago, Tazio said:

I got torn up for arsepaper by a policewoman in Monterey as I’d parked for a minute facing oncoming traffic as my wife had left her sunglasses in our hotel room and wanted to pop back in for them. My defence of sorry I didn’t realise just seemed to make her even more furious. The result being instead of a minute facing the wrong way it was closer to five by the time she’d used me as a punchbag for whatever was going wrong in her life. She wouldn’t even let us get back in the car until she’d finished making me feel like the cause of death on the roads of California. 

 

On the plus side, she didn't shoot you!   :icon14:

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