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Set my travel scope up for a look at the moon tonight. Tried for a couple of pictures but too much wobble from the wind.

 

Stunning view tonight though if you pick your moment between the cloud.

Wait till the moon is about a third or a quarter. That way it's not so bright on your eyes and you will see the shadows of the mountains along the terminator line.

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Really? :oldsad:

 

So no chance of seeing Jupiter and beyond as was advertised on that model then.. :laugh4:

 

What scope would you recommend? :mw_confused:

You will see Jupiter easily with binocs. If it's the four moons you want to see then a cheap scope would do it.

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Wait till the moon is about a third or a quarter. That way it's not so bright on your eyes and you will see the shadows of the mountains along the terminator line.

I've got a moon filter lens.

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I've been into Astronomy for as long as I can remember. Parents bought me a wee white Argos telescope when I was about 10 or something. Crap, but got me interested.

 

I have quite a good pair of binoculars just now. Nothing fancy, but they do the trick. I had a quick look at the moon last night and it was stunning, so much detail in a full moon.

 

The missus got me a couple of tickets to go and see Professor Brian Cox live in March, can't wait because I've always been a huge fan of his work and the way he speaks about the Universe.

 

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

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maroonlegions

You will see Jupiter easily with binocs. If it's the four moons you want to see then a cheap scope would do it.

 

This link has some good advice for star gazing binoculars.

 

There was a lot to consider: magnification versus mass, field of view, prism type, optical quality ("sharpness"), light transmission, age of the user (to match "exit pupil" size, which changes as we grow older), shock resistance, waterproofing and more. To choose binoculars for yourself, check out our Buyer's Guide: How to Choose Binoculars for Stargazing.

 

Still want a telescope though. 

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Surely your hands would be far too shaky for binoculars?

My trick is to lie on the ground and look up with binocs sort of balanced on my eyes so there is no shake.. Works for the andromeda galaxy which is high in the sky but less good for the lower azimuth stuff.

 

Binocs can also be mounted on tripod if you have a fitting.

 

Scopes are of course better but need to be continually slewed to follow the target. If I had cash I'd buy a scope with the computerised identification thing. That slews automatically and you just hit a button and it goes to wherever you choose. Pain in the ass to calibrate though.

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Samuel Camazzola

In Fife at present and the sky is very clear. Looking in a southerly (ish) direction, what is the very bright and prominent 'star'? It's impressive.

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maroonlegions

In Fife at present and the sky is very clear. Looking in a southerly (ish) direction, what is the very bright and prominent 'star'? It's impressive.

 

This is good for future references on whats visible  in the night sky this January,

 

Sky Maps and Video Guides

Best Night Sky Events of January 2017 (Stargazing Maps)

See what's up in the night sky for January 2017, including stargazing events and the moon's phases, in this Space.com gallery courtesy of Starry Night Software.

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maroonlegions

In Fife at present and the sky is very clear. Looking in a southerly (ish) direction, what is the very bright and prominent 'star'? It's impressive.

 

Venus i think.

 

In order from their outward order from our  sun , the five bright planets are Mercury,Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. They tend to be brighter than the brightest stars.

Edited by maroonlegions
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Venus i think.

 

In order from their outward order from our  sun , the five bright planets are Mercury,Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. They tend to be brighter than the brightest stars.

Can one see Mercury at night time?  Genuine question.

 

I always thought that you could only see it in the daytime, with special filters on the telescope, as it's so close to the sun.

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In Fife at present and the sky is very clear. Looking in a southerly (ish) direction, what is the very bright and prominent 'star'? It's impressive.

It's Venus. A bit north-west of Venus and much fainter is Mars

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Can one see Mercury at night time?  Genuine question.

 

I always thought that you could only see it in the daytime, with special filters on the telescope, as it's so close to the sun.

Found the answer to my own question:

 

Stargazers have the best chance of the year to spot Mercury in the evening sky over the next week, but only if you know how to find the elusive planet.

Like most of the planets, Mercury is quite bright, among the brightest objects in the night sky. Despite this, it is probably the least often seen of all the planets.

The problem with Mercury is that it never strays very far from the sun. It can be seen occasionally as a tiny speck just after sunset or just before sunrise, but most people, even serious skywatchers, have never seen it. In fact, it is said that famed Johannes Kepler, who figured out the laws of planetary motion, never saw Mercury in his entire life in the late 16th and early 17th centuries

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Just set up my telescope the Mrs got for my xmas the year before last (took me long enough) due to this thread [emoji1303]. Adjusting it seems tricky though so will go back to it in a bit. That moon earlier as it was rising was stunning, was bright orange from where I was looking, stunning and biggest I can recall seeing it before.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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maroonlegions

Can one see Mercury at night time?  Genuine question.

 

I always thought that you could only see it in the daytime, with special filters on the telescope, as it's so close to the sun.

 

As i have previously stated on here i am no astronomer.

 

You would be better off googling it.

 

This below from Space.com.

 

This from 2014.

 

 

mercurynightsky.png?interpolation=lanczo

 

"Stargazers have the best chance of the year to spot Mercury in the evening sky over the next week, but only if you know how to find the elusive planet.

 

Like most of the planets, Mercury is quite bright, among the brightest objects in the night sky. Despite this, it is probably the least often seen of all the planets.

 

The problem with Mercury is that it never strays very far from the sun. It can be seen occasionally as a tiny speck just after sunset or just before sunrise, but most people, even serious skywatchers, have never seen it.

 

In fact, it is said that famed Johannes Kepler, who figured out the laws of planetary motion, never saw Mercury in his entire life in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. [The Most Enduring Mysteries of Mercury]

 

 http://www.space.com/skywatching

Edited by maroonlegions
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maroonlegions

Can one see Mercury at night time?  Genuine question.

 

I always thought that you could only see it in the daytime, with special filters on the telescope, as it's so close to the sun.

 

 

 

 

oops double post.

Edited by maroonlegions
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maroonlegions

As i have previously stated on here i am no astronomer.

 

You would be better off googling it.

 

This below from Space.com.

 

This from 2014.

 

 

mercurynightsky.png?interpolation=lanczo

 

"Stargazers have the best chance of the year to spot Mercury in the evening sky over the next week, but only if you know how to find the elusive planet.

 

Like most of the planets, Mercury is quite bright, among the brightest objects in the night sky. Despite this, it is probably the least often seen of all the planets.

 

The problem with Mercury is that it never strays very far from the sun. It can be seen occasionally as a tiny speck just after sunset or just before sunrise, but most people, even serious skywatchers, have never seen it.

 

In fact, it is said that famed Johannes Kepler, who figured out the laws of planetary motion, never saw Mercury in his entire life in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. [The Most Enduring Mysteries of Mercury]

 

 http://www.space.com/skywatching

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maroonlegions

Found the answer to my own question:

 

Stargazers have the best chance of the year to spot Mercury in the evening sky over the next week, but only if you know how to find the elusive planet.

Like most of the planets, Mercury is quite bright, among the brightest objects in the night sky. Despite this, it is probably the least often seen of all the planets.

The problem with Mercury is that it never strays very far from the sun. It can be seen occasionally as a tiny speck just after sunset or just before sunrise, but most people, even serious skywatchers, have never seen it. In fact, it is said that famed Johannes Kepler, who figured out the laws of planetary motion, never saw Mercury in his entire life in the late 16th and early 17th centuries

 

ha ha, and i found it too. lol 

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Samuel Camazzola

This is good for future references on whats visible in the night sky this January,

Sky Maps and Video Guides

Best Night Sky Events of January 2017 (Stargazing Maps)

See what's up in the night sky for January 2017, including stargazing events and the moon's phases, in this Space.com gallery courtesy of Starry Night Software.

Cheers for this. Very interesting read.

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Samuel Camazzola

The measure of light years is fascinating. If a huge detonation on the moon was initiated, how long (in seconds or minutes) would it take for this to be visible from Earth? Likewise, what would be the timescale if the same was to happen with other planets that are visible from Earth?

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The measure of light years is fascinating. If a huge detonation on the moon was initiated, how long (in seconds or minutes) would it take for this to be visible from Earth? Likewise, what would be the timescale if the same was to happen with other planets that are visible from Earth?

For the moon it's 1.3 seconds.

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The measure of light years is fascinating. If a huge detonation on the moon was initiated, how long (in seconds or minutes) would it take for this to be visible from Earth? Likewise, what would be the timescale if the same was to happen with other planets that are visible from Earth?

The sun is 8 minutes.

 

Jupiter is about 30 I think.

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The measure of light years is fascinating. If a huge detonation on the moon was initiated, how long (in seconds or minutes) would it take for this to be visible from Earth? Likewise, what would be the timescale if the same was to happen with other planets that are visible from Earth?

Light years is typically the measurement used between stars.  The closest star is 4 light years away.

 

For measurements within our solar system, Astronomical Units is the standard.  By definition, the earth is one AU from the sun.

 

Going outwards, Jupiter is 5 AUs out, Saturn 9, Uranus 19, and Neptune 30 AUs.  Vast distances.

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maroonlegions

There she is Mars , my favourite planet.

 

Mars.jpg

 

 

 

Would love to be able to see a clear picture of her from a telescope.

 

Hopefully one day man will land on her and maybe even colonise her, NASA are working on the maths and science needed as we speak.

 

 

Here, a landscape image captured by NASAs Mars Curiosity rover ;

 

 

pia17603-FigA-unannotated-hpfeat.jpg

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There she is Mars , my favourite planet.

 

Mars.jpg

 

 

 

Would love to be able to see a clear picture of her from a telescope.

 

Hopefully one day man will land on her and maybe even colonise her, NASA are working on the maths and science needed as we speak.

 

 

Here, a landscape image captured by NASAs Mars Curiosity rover ;

 

 

pia17603-FigA-unannotated-hpfeat.jpg

If you have a scope or binocs Mars is clearly visible tonight if the clouds clear. Find Venus, go left a bit and up a bit and Mars is clearly visible to naked eye.

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maroonlegions

If you have a scope or binocs Mars is clearly visible tonight if the clouds clear. Find Venus, go left a bit and up a bit and Mars is clearly visible to naked eye.

 

Thats just it, i have neither just now, :ermm: only a naked eye.  :smart: Its going to be a long six months until my birthday when i get some kind of viewing paraphernalia. :sweat:  

 

Cheers for the info. 

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John Gentleman

The post about the SKA in South Africa is interesting.  Why will it take better images than Hubble?  We all know that Hubble gets good images because it doesn't have to contend with the distortions created by the earth's atmosphere.  To say that earthbound SKA images will be 10,000 times better than Hubble is quite a claim.  Not a hundred times, or a thousand times ... but 10,000 times better?   Hmm.

 

And why is the SKA so superior to the existing VLA in south western United States? My interest is tweeked.

 

The James Webb telescope's images will easily outshine all that's gone before ? including Hubble.

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maroonlegions


Actual footage shows what it was like to land on Saturn's moon Titan



 


UNILAD.CO.UK|BY FRANCESCA DONOVAN

 

 

 


Few of us will ever get the chance to travel to space or discover another planet.


But now you can follow the journey of a probe landing on Titan, the planet Saturn?s moon, thanks to this footage from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology.






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It's probably been posted however they predict 2 stars which collided 1800 years ago will be able to be viewed in 2022! I might have got that wrong lol!

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John Gentleman
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maroonlegions

The last image is called the "pillars of creation" were young stars,(suns), are formed.

 

 

This image below is called "the mystic mountain". Again a star,(sun), forming region inside the Carina Nebula.

 

 

Mystic-Mountain.jpg

 

 

 

Its mind-blowing to even comprehend the amount of energy and force generated and needed to form young stars or suns.

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The last image is called the "pillars of creation" were young stars,(suns), are formed.

 

 

This image below is called "the mystic mountain". Again a star,(sun), forming region inside the Carina Nebula.

 

 

Mystic-Mountain.jpg

 

 

Its mind-blowing to even comprehend the amount of energy and force generated and needed to form young stars or suns.

Gravity, my friend, gravity.  That's all it takes.

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Thunderstruck
maroonlegions

Impressive if not mindbogglingly impressive at the same time.

 

 

 A universe of 2 trillion galaxies

An international team of astronomers, led by Christopher Conselice, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Nottingham, have found that the universe contains at least 2 trillion galaxies, ten times more than previously thought. The team's work,?
PHYS.ORG
 
 
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I'm watching a small meteor shower just now and there's a satellite passing over glasgow just now that's easily seen with the naked eye. Too small to be the ISS but it's easy to see.

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I'm watching a small meteor shower just now and there's a satellite passing over glasgow just now that's easily seen with the naked eye. Too small to be the ISS but it's easy to see.

Anyone wanting to see the ISS there are plenty ISS tracking websites that will tell you where and when to look.

 

Anyone spotted Mars yet?

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Anyone wanting to see the ISS there are plenty ISS tracking websites that will tell you where and when to look.

 

Anyone spotted Mars yet?

 

Mars and Venus were good last night around 6. Fog came in after that.

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For anyone who's interested - this guy's channel is an informative and accessible source of knowledge re. celestial stuff.

 

Here's a good example:

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  • 2 weeks later...
maroonlegions

Mental, mind boggling. :rolleyes5:

 

Were does that leave us in the complex scheme of things if indeed these boffins are on to something.  :huh:

 

 

This universe just got  a whole lot  weirder   :laugh4:

 

 

 

 

4-studyreveals.jpg

 

 

 

A UK, Canadian and Italian study has provided what researchers believe is the first observational evidence that our universe could be a vast and complex hologram.
PHYS.ORG
 
 
Edited by maroonlegions
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I love this kind of thing as well. I have a scope with an eq3 mount which tracks so makes it easier. It's not an expensive scope but the moon is amazing through it. The planets are OK.

 

My tips would be.

 

1. Get a good set of binoculars rather than a cheap telescope and try to learn where things are in the sky.

2. Darkness is your friend.. the darker the better.

3. If you do get a scope, get some good quality eye peices.. they can make a poor scope better. A massive massive difference in what you can make out on the moon for example.

4. I'm not joking about the darkness.. it is so important

 

Also.. it's been said already, stars will always just be a spot of light on the sky. But sometimes, what you think is 1 star will become 2 or 3 and that is amazing when you find this.

Edited by Bigsmak
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maroonlegions

I love this kind of thing as well. I have a scope with an eq3 mount which tracks so makes it easier. It's not an expensive scope but the moon is amazing through it. The planets are OK.

 

My tips would be.

 

1. Get a good set of binoculars rather than a cheap telescope and try to learn where things are in the sky.

2. Darkness is your friend.. the darker the better.

3. If you do get a scope, get some good quality eye peices.. they can make a poor scope better. A massive massive difference in what you can make out on the moon for example.

4. I'm not joking about the darkness.. it is so important

 

Also.. it's been said already, stars will always just be a spot of light on the sky. But sometimes, what you think is 1 star will become 2 or 3 and that is amazing when you find this.

 

Good advice.

 

Light pollution is a big factor on just what you are able to see.

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