Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jambomuzz

Cooking?

Recommended Posts

Jamboelite

If you want to eat a bit healthier as well then I recommend the Pinch of Nom books they are great and the recipes are easy.

 

I also recommend a slow cooker and you can get a list of recipes for that easy enough. Slow cooker recipes are a good start as its literally throwing everything in and then coming back to it later.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
On 19/02/2020 at 13:25, Lovecraft said:

 I love cooking.

 

Here's my hangover mac n cheese recipe.  Looks long, but it's not.   15 mins tops, 20 if you wanna grill it.

 

I usually use the spiral macaroni, but any will do.

 

Ingredients:

1 bag of macaroni.  Your choice, but preferably durum wheat.

1 large block of white extra strong mature cheddar - grated

2 cloves of garlic, or garlic paste if that's what you have

1 pint of full fat milk

small glass of double cream if you have it - roughly half one of the little tubs

About 4 tablespoons of plain flour

2 teaspoons of mustard.  I usually use the wholegrain stuff, but the squeezy stuff will do.

Worcester sauce

Optional -   2 leeks

A big knob of butter

Salt and pepper

 

Method

 

-Boil pasta with a couple of teaspoons of salt till it's soft but still firm.  Roughly 10 mins

-Strain into colander and leave it aside

-Using the same pot, put it back on a low heat

-Add nearly all the butter and stir it till it melts

-Add the flour and keep stirring till it all mixes together to look like dough and clumps together

-Add the milk and turn the heat up to high

-Keep stirring until you feel it starting to thicken, as soon as it does, turn the heat back to low.

-Add nearly all the cheese leaving a handful

-Stir until it cheese melts

-Add mustard, salt and pepper

-Add cream - if you want it creamier.  You don't need it though.

-Stir until the sauce is nice and fluid

-Add the macaroni and stir it all together

 

If I'm not using leeks, I would add the garlic here too.   Chop them both up.   The smaller the garlic is chopped, the stronger the taste.  The leeks can be chopped fairly roughly.

 

Optional part with leeks

In another pan, put it on a medium heat and melt the rest of the butter, then add the garlic and the leeks.   I usually only use the white part of the leeks, but it's up to you.  Just chopped the white part up into small bits.  Fry in the butter for about 5 mins till it is all soft.

Chuck them in the pot and stir it all together.

 

Serve with a splash of Worcester sauce and some more cheese on top......    

 

Or, whack it all in an oven dish, add the rest of the cheese on top with some pepper and a few splashes of Worcester sauce.    Grill under a hot grill for about 5 mins till the cheese bubbles.

 

The cheese is the key ingredient.  Needs to be strong and loads of it.

 

Serve and fall asleep 15 mins later.

 

Hangover gone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If I have learned 1 thing in the last month, it is 'The cheese is the key ingredient.  Needs to be strong and loads of it.'

I made cauliflower cheese, with more cheese. What a difference. 

Planning on making it tomorrow, I will put lots of cheese in it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
obua

I melt cheese on lots of my meals, thats why I’m a fat barsteward.and the beer obv .😇

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lovecraft
56 minutes ago, Zlatanable said:

If I have learned 1 thing in the last month, it is 'The cheese is the key ingredient.  Needs to be strong and loads of it.'

I made cauliflower cheese, with more cheese. What a difference. 

Planning on making it tomorrow, I will put lots of cheese in it. 

Yup.  I usually go extra mature white cheddar.

 

Lidl's mature white cheese is great.   So is Costco's mature cheese.  Both really strong.  You can usually tell a decent strong cheese as it usually has crystals in it.

 

I Don't think I have ever eaten anything and thought - **** me, that had too much cheese in it.

 

Gruyere cheese is a daddy for cooking.  Even if just to top dishes off.   I made cheese scones the other month with Gruyere cheese and they were ****ing amazing.  Wee bit paprika in the flour mix too.    I had to stop myself eating them all while they were still warm.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
32 minutes ago, Lovecraft said:

Yup.  I usually go extra mature white cheddar.

 

Lidl's mature white cheese is great.   So is Costco's mature cheese.  Both really strong.  You can usually tell a decent strong cheese as it usually has crystals in it.

 

I Don't think I have ever eaten anything and thought - **** me, that had too much cheese in it.

 

Gruyere cheese is a daddy for cooking.  Even if just to top dishes off.   I made cheese scones the other month with Gruyere cheese and they were ****ing amazing.  Wee bit paprika in the flour mix too.    I had to stop myself eating them all while they were still warm.

 

 

 

Your recipe clicked a switch. 

And now I know.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vlad Magic

Bitten the the cooking bug last summer after a visit to Rick Steins cookery school.

 

We did a Thai street food one day course because both myself and the Mrs love Thai food.

 

Really lit a fire in me and a further 2 cookery courses later I can put some decent food on the table.

 

I think a lot of it is confidence? Not wanting to spend money on ingredients only for you to cock it up and end up throwing it away? It was with me anyway.

 

I now make all my own pastes. Red, yellow and green. It’s really enjoyable taking a massive number of ingredients then processing them into an end product that keeps for ages in the freezer and makes the curry authentic.

 

I will spend a day making big batches of pastes and chucking them in the freezer for use later. Much tastier than the shop bought options.

 

Recently started on Chinese recipes to save ordering take away. Simple wok cooked recipes with fresh ingredients. 
 

Mastering Dim Sum currently. Pork and prawn with ginger and garlic and chilli. Dead easy!!

 

Crispy beef with sweet chilli sauce. Again really easy and sooooo much better than the gloopy MSG crap you get from takeaways.

 

I was officially the worst for cooking just 12 months ago. Would spend a fortune buying crap in. Now I can put on 3 courses of either Italian, Thai or Chinese with confidence and the food tastes amazing.

 

Give it a go and be confident.

 

Cooking is amazing 👍👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevie1874
On 19/02/2020 at 13:25, Lovecraft said:

 I love cooking.

 

Here's my hangover mac n cheese recipe.  Looks long, but it's not.   15 mins tops, 20 if you wanna grill it.

 

I usually use the spiral macaroni, but any will do.

 

Ingredients:

1 bag of macaroni.  Your choice, but preferably durum wheat.

1 large block of white extra strong mature cheddar - grated

2 cloves of garlic, or garlic paste if that's what you have

1 pint of full fat milk

small glass of double cream if you have it - roughly half one of the little tubs

About 4 tablespoons of plain flour

2 teaspoons of mustard.  I usually use the wholegrain stuff, but the squeezy stuff will do.

Worcester sauce

Optional -   2 leeks

A big knob of butter

Salt and pepper

 

Method

 

-Boil pasta with a couple of teaspoons of salt till it's soft but still firm.  Roughly 10 mins

-Strain into colander and leave it aside

-Using the same pot, put it back on a low heat

-Add nearly all the butter and stir it till it melts

-Add the flour and keep stirring till it all mixes together to look like dough and clumps together

-Add the milk and turn the heat up to high

-Keep stirring until you feel it starting to thicken, as soon as it does, turn the heat back to low.

-Add nearly all the cheese leaving a handful

-Stir until it cheese melts

-Add mustard, salt and pepper

-Add cream - if you want it creamier.  You don't need it though.

-Stir until the sauce is nice and fluid

-Add the macaroni and stir it all together

 

If I'm not using leeks, I would add the garlic here too.   Chop them both up.   The smaller the garlic is chopped, the stronger the taste.  The leeks can be chopped fairly roughly.

 

Optional part with leeks

In another pan, put it on a medium heat and melt the rest of the butter, then add the garlic and the leeks.   I usually only use the white part of the leeks, but it's up to you.  Just chopped the white part up into small bits.  Fry in the butter for about 5 mins till it is all soft.

Chuck them in the pot and stir it all together.

 

Serve with a splash of Worcester sauce and some more cheese on top......    

 

Or, whack it all in an oven dish, add the rest of the cheese on top with some pepper and a few splashes of Worcester sauce.    Grill under a hot grill for about 5 mins till the cheese bubbles.

 

The cheese is the key ingredient.  Needs to be strong and loads of it.

 

Serve and fall asleep 15 mins later.

 

Hangover gone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pretty much hopeless at cooking but made this tonight ( with the leeks) Superb 👍 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lovecraft
9 hours ago, stevie1874 said:

Pretty much hopeless at cooking but made this tonight ( with the leeks) Superb 👍 

 Good job.   Now you see how easy it can be to cook.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lovecraft
On 21/02/2020 at 13:37, Ribble said:

 

I recently made a middleeastern version of a chilli con carne that turned out really well!

 

Basically swapping some of the standard chilli ingredients for stuff i use in a recipe for Moroccan Stoup so

 

Paprika - use Ras en hanout spice mix

Chilli's - Harrisa paste

Beans - pre-cooked green lentils

 

Kept everything else the same and served with some bread that had been toasted after being drizzled with olive oil and a sprinkle of sumac powder

 Will have to get some of this.  Don't think I have tried it.

 

I actually have a tajine dish, so it would be a good reason to dig it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
milky_26
13 hours ago, stevie1874 said:

Pretty much hopeless at cooking but made this tonight ( with the leeks) Superb 👍 

that is the first step, you can follow a recipe. not the n=most complex but also not the simplest. all you can do now is try other things and go from there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auld Reekin'
On 19/02/2020 at 13:39, Lovecraft said:

I get loads of pheasant and rabbits, so these need to be cooked for a while.  The slow cooker is perfect for them.

 

Lamb is the daddy of meats for me.  Don't understand how some people don't like it.

 

Lamb curry, lamb mince chilli, lamb stew.   ****, I want some lamb now.

 

 

 

Goat, if you can get hold of it (tricky in Scotland, in my experience), is lovely meat too. Quite similar to lamb, but generally leaner and healthier too I believe. I made a rather wonderful (he modestly admits) West Indian-style Curried Goat at the weekend, made with goat chops, potatoes, and carrots. We had the chops in the freezer after bringing them back as "souvenirs" of our last trip to London.   

 

5 hours ago, Lovecraft said:

 Will have to get some of this.  Don't think I have tried it.

 

I actually have a tajine dish, so it would be a good reason to dig it out.

 

As well as Ras al Hanout, try the Middle Eastern spice mix Za'atar, if you haven't already. It's not hot at all, but very tasty and tangy. That, with sumac, is great sprinkled over chicken or fish before grilling or roasting.

 

I've also been using allspice more and more recently: it's used in many Turkish and Middle Eastern recipes - and in many other cuisines - and adds a real richness and depth of flavour. Cinnamon in savoury cooking is worth experimenting with as well, and is used quite a lot in Moorish-influenced Spanish cooking, as well as in North Africa, the Middle East, and oriental cuisines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tazio

My recent Sunday roast favourite is a winner and better than that really simple. 

A decent sized bit of cheap beef brisket, then I just make up a beef stock using a Knorr stock pot, half boiling water and half red wine, add some garlic, thyme, Worcestershire sauce, a hefty squirt of tomato paste, a finely chopped shallot, and some black pepper.

Brown the brisket all over in a very hot pan with a bit of oil after you've rubbed some salt and pepper into it, if has a large cap of fat on it make sure there isn't too much left before you put it in the oven or it can make quite a greasy gravy. Then put it in a pyrex dish that's big enough to submerge it most of the way once you add the stock and a load of either chopped mushrooms or whole button mushrooms. Chuck it in the oven with the lid on and cook it for at least 4 hours at around 140c, longer the better as you can't overcook it. Just baste it every now and then to stop the top of the meat getting burnt. Then get it out the oven about the same time as you're putting the veggies on. Then thicken up the stock from cooking in a pan with your choice of gravy thickening. Guaranteed the best gravy you've tasted. 

The best thing other than the eating is the fact that it actually works better with cheap meat as it has more flavour than something like topside. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lovecraft
3 hours ago, Auld Reekin' said:

 

Goat, if you can get hold of it (tricky in Scotland, in my experience), is lovely meat too. Quite similar to lamb, but generally leaner and healthier too I believe. I made a rather wonderful (he modestly admits) West Indian-style Curried Goat at the weekend, made with goat chops, potatoes, and carrots. We had the chops in the freezer after bringing them back as "souvenirs" of our last trip to London.   

 

 

As well as Ras al Hanout, try the Middle Eastern spice mix Za'atar, if you haven't already. It's not hot at all, but very tasty and tangy. That, with sumac, is great sprinkled over chicken or fish before grilling or roasting.

 

I've also been using allspice more and more recently: it's used in many Turkish and Middle Eastern recipes - and in many other cuisines - and adds a real richness and depth of flavour. Cinnamon in savoury cooking is worth experimenting with as well, and is used quite a lot in Moorish-influenced Spanish cooking, as well as in North Africa, the Middle East, and oriental cuisines.

  Sounds very nice.   Will give it a go.

 

Shame you can't really get goat here easily.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cade

Found a jar of roasted red peppers at the back of the cupboard, miraculously somehow still in date.

Chucked them in the food processor with a bit of garlic, a big handful of parmesan cheese, some thyme and some olive oil and blitzed it into a red pesto.

Went down a treat on some al dente pasta.

:greggy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ribble
On 25/03/2020 at 13:19, Auld Reekin' said:

As well as Ras al Hanout, try the Middle Eastern spice mix Za'atar, if you haven't already. It's not hot at all, but very tasty and tangy. That, with sumac, is great sprinkled over chicken or fish before grilling or roasting.

 

Only recently discovered Sumac and i'm obsessed with it! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tazio

Didn't Liam Neeson play Ras al Hanout in the Batman film?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auld Reekin'
4 minutes ago, Ribble said:

 

Only recently discovered Sumac and i'm obsessed with it! 

 

Yep, it's good stuff, and really quite versatile - can be used with most savoury dishes to give a citrus tang and looks nice when sprinkled over too. The combination of that, Za'atar, oregano / thyme, and allspice when grilling or roasting chicken is wonderful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
milky_26
45 minutes ago, Tazio said:

Didn't Liam Neeson play Ras al Hanout in the Batman film?

it helped spice up his performance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cade

Za'atar or sumac are also delicious simply mixed with a bit of olive oil and brushed over a plain pizza base and baked for a few minutes in a very hot oven.

A lovely wee side dish or booze snack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
milky_26

just made  some mince and tatties, lovely.

 

and will be making tomato soup later

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CJGJ

Okay time to start learning/retraining myself on a few things

 

So with 24 eggs bought I thought Scrambled eggs, omelettes,  poached and boiled eggs would be a good place to start

 

So 8 eggs ruined on the way but now just about have the eggs food type licked

 

Fed up with eggs after 3 days though.

 

Tomato soup was surprisingly easy though

 

 

tin, tin opener, open tin , pour into pan and heat.....loved the Heinz soup !!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...