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Being quizzed by my kids as to why I support Heart of Midlothian


Craigieboy

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I tried to explain to my kids today that supporting a team like Hearts is not based on logic.

 

In their tiny wee 6 year old minds they were quizing me about the amount of trophies Hearts have won in comparison to say, Celtic (their in-lawed Grandads team) or Rangers.

 

In the mind of a 6 year old, I suppose quantity is all that they measure success by. How many Ben 10 cards do you have? And so on.

 

I had to try and reign in the conversation & put my spin on things as I was driving home from the Gyle & being faced with all these logical/black & white dilemas from 2 wee people who are simply beginning to be perplexed as to why I support Heart of Midlothian & not the high scoring, cheating *******s from the west.

 

In the few seconds that I had to think, I simply had to recall the fire station at Calder Road as we had just past it. I remembered that in 1998, the firemen were out on top of the engines waving Hearts scarves & flags. I told them how old women & kids were at their gates all along the route to Gorgie clapping & cheering.

 

I reiterted what I had heard at last nights shareholders dinner - we support this club, not for success but because we just simply love it. For some of us our dads supported the Hearts. And even their dads dads supported the Hearts.

 

For me it's just that simple.

 

I could see by their reaction that they were confused by this apparent lack of numbers in relation to success. Lets face it, our 7 cup wins to Celtics 34 seems quite out of sink with the way that a wee 6 year old measures success.

 

But they were still happy to refer to Hearts as 'our' team & my wee girl even managed to find excuses as to why we haven't won so many trophies as Celtic. She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

 

You've got to love them!

 

Supporting Hearts might well be frustrating & horrible & utterly disappointing. But it's what we are. It's where we are from.

 

.

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I tried to explain to my kids today that supporting a team like Hearts is not based on logic.

 

In their tiny wee 6 year old minds they were quizing me about the amount of trophies Hearts have won in comparison to say, Celtic (their in-lawed Grandads team) or Rangers.

 

In the mind of a 6 year old, I suppose quantity is all that they measure success by. How many Ben 10 cards do you have? And so on.

 

I had to try and reign in the conversation & put my spin on things as I was driving home from the Gyle & being faced with all these logical/black & white dilemas from 2 wee people who are simply beginning to be perplexed as to why I support Heart of Midlothian & not the high scoring, cheating *******s from the west.

 

In the few seconds that I had to think, I simply had to recall the fire station at Calder Road as we had just past it. I remembered that in 1998, the firemen were out on top of the engines waving Hearts scarves & flags. I told them how old women & kids were at their gates all along the route to Gorgie clapping & cheering.

 

I reiterted what I had heard at last nights shareholders dinner - we support this club, not for success but because we just simply love it. For some of us our dads supported the Hearts. And even their dads dads supported the Hearts.

 

For me it's just that simple.

 

I could see by their reaction that they were confused by this apparent lack of numbers in relation to success. Lets face it, our 7 cup wins to Celtics 34 seems quite out of sink with the way that a wee 6 year old measures success.

 

But they were still happy to refer to Hearts as 'our' team & my wee girl even managed to find excuses as to why we haven't won so many trophies as Celtic. She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

 

You've got to love them!

 

Supporting Hearts might well be frustrating & horrible & utterly disappointing. But it's what we are. It's where we are from.

 

.

 

Couldnt have put it any better. I follow in the footsteps of my dad and love hearing the memories of the past.me Being only 19 just now my dad tells me of the days of robbo earlier on in his career, mackay, busby, foster etc. he has always said that being a hearts fan is not about winning all these trophies, its just a love for the club thats been passed through generations. I hope in the future to tell stories of players that ive witnessed at tynecastle and the memories (good or bad) that they have given me. I was asked at work recentlly by a non football follower why im so 'obsessed' with hearts when they win nothing and all i could explain was that ive grown up watching them, theyve become heroes to me and its a love for the club rather than just following a team full of success. My dad has seen hearts lift the scottish twice in his 47 years, iv witnessed the same in just 19 years so i count myself lucky and its days like those two games that make me proud to be a hearts fan and realise why through all the good and bad times that i will follow them no matter what situation we are in because for me, there is nothing better than heart of midlothian.

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the way i like to think of it is this:

 

when hearts won the scottish cup against rangers in 1998 it was an overwhelming feeling and that day i sat and watched grown men cry tears of joy,getting back to edinburgh as posted earlier people were standing on the streets of edinburgh just to welcome the team back to the capital.

the cup parade is something i dont think i ever expected the amount of people celebrating the cup win was truelly breathtaking.

the monkey was finally off our back and this famous football team was finally back at a level it was used to so many years ago.

 

on the other hand when hearts won the scottish cup against gretna in 2006 there was a real feeling of anti climax all though it was great to win the scottish cup again it was against lesser opposition, and we were expected to absolutely pump them....

 

THATS HOW IT FEELS TO BE AN OLD FIRM SUPPORTER!!!!

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I was asked at work recentlly by a non football follower why im so 'obsessed' with hearts when they win nothing

 

I get this all the time & I must admit to being a little intolerant of this repeated patronising pishwater.

 

I look at everyone else & say 'how the **** can you support that buch of glory hunting bastsrds you lame **** shallow **** head?'

 

.

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show your kids this

 

being a jambo isn't about winning its about supporting the club through thick and thin, but on the rare occasions we are victorious its very special. and makes the pain all the more worth while. the uglies from the west will never feel the joy which we all felt when the cup came down gorgie that night.

 

i would rather be part of a handful of days like the above than to be on OF fan who only wants to win to prevent the other lot from celebrating

 

its easy to be a fan of the OF, its takes dedication and love for the club to be a jambo.

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show your kids this

 

being a jambo isn't about winning its about supporting the club through thick and thin, but on the rare occasions we are victorious its very special. and makes the pain all the more worth while. the uglies from the west will never feel the joy which we all felt when the cup came down gorgie that night.

 

i would rather be part of a handful of days like the above than to be on OF fan who only wants to win to prevent the other lot from celebrating

 

its easy to be a fan of the OF, its takes dedication and love for the club to be a jambo.

 

Yes, do it! That video just says everything about what this club is all about. PMSL at JJ's interview with Hazel Irvine in part 8! Remember the way those Rangers fans just seemed to shrug at winning another League Cup in 1996? They'll never have any clue what it feels like: none at all.

 

Football isn't just about winning. It's about glory; and more than that, history, passion, community, and the memories you share with others all of a like mind. I find it hard to believe that any other club encapsulates all that as well as Hearts: how many other fanbases anywhere have had a day, and a weekend, like that? Amazing. And whenever you're feeling down, all you have to do is watch that video, and it brings it all back again.

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Its time to force them to game, see the inustice we suffer, feel the glory when we win, feel the pain when we lose. They will then understand what its all about and be Heart of Midlothian supporters.

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kingantti1874
show your kids this

 

being a jambo isn't about winning its about supporting the club through thick and thin, but on the rare occasions we are victorious its very special. and makes the pain all the more worth while. the uglies from the west will never feel the joy which we all felt when the cup came down gorgie that night.

 

i would rather be part of a handful of days like the above than to be on OF fan who only wants to win to prevent the other lot from celebrating

 

its easy to be a fan of the OF, its takes dedication and love for the club to be a jambo.

 

god the days when hearts were hearts....it was so much easier to be a jambo then, We were just better end of...it didn't require explanation like it does today...I wonder when it will be like that again

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show your kids this

 

being a jambo isn't about winning its about supporting the club through thick and thin, but on the rare occasions we are victorious its very special. and makes the pain all the more worth while. the uglies from the west will never feel the joy which we all felt when the cup came down gorgie that night.

 

i would rather be part of a handful of days like the above than to be on OF fan who only wants to win to prevent the other lot from celebrating

 

its easy to be a fan of the OF, its takes dedication and love for the club to be a jambo.

 

Neil Pionton should be the in the Legends Hall of fame for those videos!

 

My son who is also 6 dosent quite get it yet, but in a couple of years with some more games under his belt and a number of showing of these he will.

He has the same destiny as his dad, his uncle, his grandad, grandmother, and great grandad, to follow the highs and lows of this wonderful club.

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MacDonald Jardine
god the days when hearts were hearts....it was so much easier to be a jambo then, We were just better end of...it didn't require explanation like it does today...I wonder when it will be like that again

 

It still doesn't require explanation.

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Carl Weathers

The reasons why I supported Hearts at the age of 6 and ever since:

 

Family tradition

Edinburgh team

Beautiful name and great badge

The best team colours

Constantly gubbing Hibs

 

I've since gone on to appreciate many other aspects, including:

 

Proud history and traditions

Tynecastle - The most atmospheric stadium in the country

The ambition to win trophies and split the Old Firm

Great boozers around the stadium

 

I've also developed a hatred towards the Old Firm and if anything that makes Hearts even more important to me.

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I tried to explain to my kids today that supporting a team like Hearts is not based on logic.

 

In their tiny wee 6 year old minds they were quizing me about the amount of trophies Hearts have won in comparison to say, Celtic (their in-lawed Grandads team) or Rangers.

 

In the mind of a 6 year old, I suppose quantity is all that they measure success by. How many Ben 10 cards do you have? And so on.

 

I had to try and reign in the conversation & put my spin on things as I was driving home from the Gyle & being faced with all these logical/black & white dilemas from 2 wee people who are simply beginning to be perplexed as to why I support Heart of Midlothian & not the high scoring, cheating *******s from the west.

 

In the few seconds that I had to think, I simply had to recall the fire station at Calder Road as we had just past it. I remembered that in 1998, the firemen were out on top of the engines waving Hearts scarves & flags. I told them how old women & kids were at their gates all along the route to Gorgie clapping & cheering.

 

I reiterted what I had heard at last nights shareholders dinner - we support this club, not for success but because we just simply love it. For some of us our dads supported the Hearts. And even their dads dads supported the Hearts.

 

For me it's just that simple.

 

I could see by their reaction that they were confused by this apparent lack of numbers in relation to success. Lets face it, our 7 cup wins to Celtics 34 seems quite out of sink with the way that a wee 6 year old measures success.

 

But they were still happy to refer to Hearts as 'our' team & my wee girl even managed to find excuses as to why we haven't won so many trophies as Celtic. She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

 

You've got to love them!

 

Supporting Hearts might well be frustrating & horrible & utterly disappointing. But it's what we are. It's where we are from.

 

.

 

i told my two that if they wanted to live with mummy and daddy they had to support hearts - its the law!also reinforced by telling them santa wears dark red cause he's a jambo. Oh and tlling them that rantic and hibs were swear words and if they said them they wre sent to their room. Worked ok till they told their mum-we clipes you can never trust them nor social workers

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that bit in the O P about the firemen on calder rd brought back some memories, these guys are part of what it's all about, couldn't get to the game because of work, but were elated that we did and were happy to show it. mon the hearts

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god the days when hearts were hearts....it was so much easier to be a jambo then, We were just better end of...it didn't require explanation like it does today...I wonder when it will be like that again

 

nope, we support the institution that is Heart of Midlothian, it may be many things but it's not hard as it is a natural thing

 

Players, managers and owners come and go, fans and the club are always there

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We support the greatest team in the world mate.

 

Its that simple.

 

I'm with you on that.

 

We're not the best, biggest, most successful or richest but we are the greatest imo. There's hardly a minute goes by when a thought about Hearts doesn't pop into my head. :smiley2:

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I've been thinking of starting a thread for a while but I might just hi-jack this one if nobody minds.

 

If you move away from Edinburgh for work or whatever and start a family, would you still insist on the kids supporting Hearts?

 

I am always going on at people who grew up in Edinburgh yet don't support Hearts or Hibs but what if I bring my child up in Aberdeen or Dundee (heaven forbid)? I could never tell anyone to support another team but if they started to follow the local side I don't know if it would be right to stop them.

 

Anyone had this experience or have any thoughts on what they might do?

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Carl Weathers
I'm with you on that.

 

We're not the best, biggest, most successful or richest but we are the greatest imo. There's hardly a minute goes by when a thought about Hearts doesn't pop into my head. :smiley2:

 

I'm the same.

 

Also, watching football when Hearts aren't playing is a completely different experience to when they are.

 

The full range of emotion comes out!

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Miller Jambo 60
I tried to explain to my kids today that supporting a team like Hearts is not based on logic.

 

In their tiny wee 6 year old minds they were quizing me about the amount of trophies Hearts have won in comparison to say, Celtic (their in-lawed Grandads team) or Rangers.

 

In the mind of a 6 year old, I suppose quantity is all that they measure success by. How many Ben 10 cards do you have? And so on.

 

I had to try and reign in the conversation & put my spin on things as I was driving home from the Gyle & being faced with all these logical/black & white dilemas from 2 wee people who are simply beginning to be perplexed as to why I support Heart of Midlothian & not the high scoring, cheating *******s from the west.

 

In the few seconds that I had to think, I simply had to recall the fire station at Calder Road as we had just past it. I remembered that in 1998, the firemen were out on top of the engines waving Hearts scarves & flags. I told them how old women & kids were at their gates all along the route to Gorgie clapping & cheering.

 

I reiterted what I had heard at last nights shareholders dinner - we support this club, not for success but because we just simply love it. For some of us our dads supported the Hearts. And even their dads dads supported the Hearts.

 

For me it's just that simple.

 

I could see by their reaction that they were confused by this apparent lack of numbers in relation to success. Lets face it, our 7 cup wins to Celtics 34 seems quite out of sink with the way that a wee 6 year old measures success.

 

But they were still happy to refer to Hearts as 'our' team & my wee girl even managed to find excuses as to why we haven't won so many trophies as Celtic. She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

 

You've got to love them!

 

Supporting Hearts might well be frustrating & horrible & utterly disappointing. But it's what we are. It's where we are from.

 

.

 

All you had to say mate was , its the right thing to do.

As Dell boy says, you know it makes sense.

 

Dougstar, FTH

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Captain_Peacock
I've been thinking of starting a thread for a while but I might just hi-jack this one if nobody minds.

 

If you move away from Edinburgh for work or whatever and start a family, would you still insist on the kids supporting Hearts?

 

I am always going on at people who grew up in Edinburgh yet don't support Hearts or Hibs but what if I bring my child up in Aberdeen or Dundee (heaven forbid)? I could never tell anyone to support another team but if they started to follow the local side I don't know if it would be right to stop them.

 

Anyone had this experience or have any thoughts on what they might do?

 

My family moved from Scotland to Yorkshire when I was 4, my Grandfather who was from Tranent was horrified when he discovered that I went to watch my local Yorkshire side.

 

My Father never tried to stop me & understood I just wanted to go and watch the football with my mates.

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My family moved from Scotland to Yorkshire when I was 4, my Grandfather who was from Tranent was horrified when he discovered that I went to watch my local Yorkshire side.

 

My Father never tried to stop me & understood I just wanted to go and watch the football with my mates.

 

I suppose it would be a bit different once 'your' club has really got under your skin, but at that age I don't suppose it would have. My opening remark to any OF punter is simply "you should support support your local team" .........so I suppose that must also be applied in your case to be fair.

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She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

.

 

Double her pocket money this week. :2thumbsup:

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i told my two that if they wanted to live with mummy and daddy they had to support hearts - its the law!also reinforced by telling them santa wears dark red cause he's a jambo. Oh and tlling them that rantic and hibs were swear words and if they said them they wre sent to their room. Worked ok till they told their mum-we clipes you can never trust them nor social workers

 

 

Superb :10900:

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I tried to explain to my kids today that supporting a team like Hearts is not based on logic.

 

In their tiny wee 6 year old minds they were quizing me about the amount of trophies Hearts have won in comparison to say, Celtic (their in-lawed Grandads team) or Rangers.

 

In the mind of a 6 year old, I suppose quantity is all that they measure success by. How many Ben 10 cards do you have? And so on.

 

I had to try and reign in the conversation & put my spin on things as I was driving home from the Gyle & being faced with all these logical/black & white dilemas from 2 wee people who are simply beginning to be perplexed as to why I support Heart of Midlothian & not the high scoring, cheating *******s from the west.

 

In the few seconds that I had to think, I simply had to recall the fire station at Calder Road as we had just past it. I remembered that in 1998, the firemen were out on top of the engines waving Hearts scarves & flags. I told them how old women & kids were at their gates all along the route to Gorgie clapping & cheering.

 

I reiterted what I had heard at last nights shareholders dinner - we support this club, not for success but because we just simply love it. For some of us our dads supported the Hearts. And even their dads dads supported the Hearts.

 

For me it's just that simple.

 

I could see by their reaction that they were confused by this apparent lack of numbers in relation to success. Lets face it, our 7 cup wins to Celtics 34 seems quite out of sink with the way that a wee 6 year old measures success.

 

But they were still happy to refer to Hearts as 'our' team & my wee girl even managed to find excuses as to why we haven't won so many trophies as Celtic. She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

 

You've got to love them!

 

Supporting Hearts might well be frustrating & horrible & utterly disappointing. But it's what we are. It's where we are from.

 

.

 

Great post. I've had similar wee chats with my 6 year old son which usually start Dad why do hearts not win much?It's difficult to explain its not all about winning, and there are other factors to supporting OF which I've not tried to explain.

 

He scored 7 goals at his football the other week it was great to see the wee man celebrating his his maroon kit in a sea of old firm strips. Sometimes when he out playing in the street i hear him sing the hearts song, which brings a smile to my face, looks like job done on my part!

 

I started going to tynie with my dad and uncle and has great memories for me. Now I take my son. My laddie got his first Hearts strip at 6 months when we lived in England, we moved back when he was 2. As result he seems to have a thing for England (which he'll hopefully grow out of) but as long as he is a Hearts fan I'm no bothered.

So in answer to plastic_bas post sod the local team it always the hearts for me!

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This is a great thread...I worry all the time about my 3 yr old son following my footsteps. I live in OF county..then i think to myself why?? Hearts are the most amazing club..it's not just about the team here and now. If things get bad and he questions why I'll take him to say thanks to our war dead in France.

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I've been thinking of starting a thread for a while but I might just hi-jack this one if nobody minds.

 

If you move away from Edinburgh for work or whatever and start a family, would you still insist on the kids supporting Hearts?

 

I am always going on at people who grew up in Edinburgh yet don't support Hearts or Hibs but what if I bring my child up in Aberdeen or Dundee (heaven forbid)? I could never tell anyone to support another team but if they started to follow the local side I don't know if it would be right to stop them.

 

Anyone had this experience or have any thoughts on what they might do?

 

I LEFT FOR HOLLAND 28 YEARS AGO WITH A 2 and 4 year old, thay don,t have a dutch team but are both jambo,s. as are there inlaws hear and other dutch mates.

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it's quite simple really I dont think anyone decides to become a Hearts fan you are just born one love nothing more than listening to my 8 year old son sing the Europe song he persisted all day till he learnt all the words was truley a very proud day.

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blondejamtart
show your kids this

 

being a jambo isn't about winning its about supporting the club through thick and thin, but on the rare occasions we are victorious its very special. and makes the pain all the more worth while. the uglies from the west will never feel the joy which we all felt when the cup came down gorgie that night.

 

i would rather be part of a handful of days like the above than to be on OF fan who only wants to win to prevent the other lot from celebrating

 

its easy to be a fan of the OF, its takes dedication and love for the club to be a jambo.

 

Wise words indeed! :thumbs_up:

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my daughter was born after i moved to lewis and at first was not interested in football.

when she started school 2 years ago all the other kids liked rangers.

after a while , she told me that she liked rangers.

i started explaining to her why i am a jambo(they were my local team when i was a bairn,my mothers grandfather played for them in the 30's,it is a family tradition etc etc)

it was a long road and i am still driving down that road but we are getting there.

hearts are her number1 team , hibs are a swearword in our house , she always calls the mhanks smelltic but she says she still likes rangers.

hoping to have that last bit beating out of her soon

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Guest Vanbasten1874
god the days when hearts were hearts....it was so much easier to be a jambo then, We were just better end of...it didn't require explanation like it does today...I wonder when it will be like that again

 

It never requires an explanation m8 its destiny believe me i moved into edinburgh in the 70s as a kid from a north east supporting family and every time we past tynecastle on the bus up to town i knew just knew that when the time came that was where i would be spending much of my youth adulthood and i wouldnt change a single thing . Theres a song in there somewhere and full stops commas etc etc but thats how i speak for real .

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Well said the OP !

 

When we were over in Zagreb, after the 2nd goal went in some clowns started throwing their scarfs away. The best moment for me was when of a little girl, who must have being no more than 7-8 run down the stairs to pick the scarf up and bring them back up. It was a great wee moment and even tho i had my camera in my hand i did not manage to catch it. I think she was their with her dad and brother (Anyone in Bulldog may remember them as the kids that were singing on the tables) anyway if i ever meet her father again i think i would have to shake his hand as he has manage to raise his kids the proper way !

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I've got 2 kids (10 & 8) who are season ticket holders, from experience they will question the relative lack silverware. My tips are:

 

1) Give 'em the history of The Famous

 

2) If that isn't 100% sucessful, invite them to have a second team from the continent, eg Barca, Milan, Madrid, Inter etc... & compare the sucess of these teams to the ugly sisters!

 

Going by the number of Barca shirts in evidence at the Academy each Saturday morning I think option 2 is not uncommon

 

good luck

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Well said the OP !

 

When we were over in Zagreb, after the 2nd goal went in some clowns started throwing their scarfs away. The best moment for me was when of a little girl, who must have being no more than 7-8 run down the stairs to pick the scarf up and bring them back up. It was a great wee moment and even tho i had my camera in my hand i did not manage to catch it. I think she was their with her dad and brother (Anyone in Bulldog may remember them as the kids that were singing on the tables) anyway if i ever meet her father again i think i would have to shake his hand as he has manage to raise his kids the proper way !

 

good story. Any chance they were the kids who were suso fans? Im sure it was them at the bulldog singing their hearts out with the rest of us

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I LEFT FOR HOLLAND 28 YEARS AGO WITH A 2 and 4 year old, thay don,t have a dutch team but are both jambo,s. as are there inlaws hear and other dutch mates.

 

My brother, the h***, lives in Ternuzen and I told my wee fella he was banished there for supporting them. Now everytime he talks to him he'll always say" I'm 13 and seen my team win the Scottish Cup twice, how many times has your club won it in your life".

 

It amuses me

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I tried to explain to my kids today that supporting a team like Hearts is not based on logic.

 

In their tiny wee 6 year old minds they were quizing me about the amount of trophies Hearts have won in comparison to say, Celtic (their in-lawed Grandads team) or Rangers.

 

In the mind of a 6 year old, I suppose quantity is all that they measure success by. How many Ben 10 cards do you have? And so on.

 

I had to try and reign in the conversation & put my spin on things as I was driving home from the Gyle & being faced with all these logical/black & white dilemas from 2 wee people who are simply beginning to be perplexed as to why I support Heart of Midlothian & not the high scoring, cheating *******s from the west.

 

In the few seconds that I had to think, I simply had to recall the fire station at Calder Road as we had just past it. I remembered that in 1998, the firemen were out on top of the engines waving Hearts scarves & flags. I told them how old women & kids were at their gates all along the route to Gorgie clapping & cheering.

 

I reiterted what I had heard at last nights shareholders dinner - we support this club, not for success but because we just simply love it. For some of us our dads supported the Hearts. And even their dads dads supported the Hearts.

 

For me it's just that simple.

 

I could see by their reaction that they were confused by this apparent lack of numbers in relation to success. Lets face it, our 7 cup wins to Celtics 34 seems quite out of sink with the way that a wee 6 year old measures success.

 

But they were still happy to refer to Hearts as 'our' team & my wee girl even managed to find excuses as to why we haven't won so many trophies as Celtic. She looked at me as I was turning our last roundabout on Calder Rd and said 'No matter what dad, you've got to always support Hearts'.

 

You've got to love them!

 

Supporting Hearts might well be frustrating & horrible & utterly disappointing. But it's what we are. It's where we are from.

 

.

 

they have to follow their dad, simples

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Hearts isn't about winning every weekend and being overly succesful in every domestic competition, although it would be good to have success now and again I would choose to keep things the way they are.

 

I simply chose Hearts because they were my Dad's team and a local team. Although I stayed with my Mum (A tim) for most of my life, I chose not to follow her or the rest of the family on her side into being OF brainwashed.

 

Another reason for being a Jambo is the feeling you get when we win a trophy. The only satisfaction the OF get from winning trophies is knowing they beat their rivals to another title, however when Hearts win a trophy it really makes u proud to be a Jambo.

 

I would rather keep things the way they are and keep going to Tynecastle every other week, even in the winter months when theyre's minus temperatures and heavy rain and even if the team play terrible and lose to teams like St. Mirren, Kilmarnock etc. It's alot better than being an armchair supporter for a team of overpaid, overrated diddies who win every week.

 

OF supporters always moan about the wee things like not spending big on players, how can they do that when theyre the ones winning every trophy. Us supporters of lesser teams get behind the lads and rarely moan win, lose or draw.

 

So that is why I am Jambo:10900:

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Hearts isn't about winning every weekend and being overly succesful in every domestic competition, although it would be good to have success now and again I would choose to keep things the way they are.

 

I simply chose Hearts because they were my Dad's team and a local team. Although I stayed with my Mum (A tim) for most of my life, I chose not to follow her or the rest of the family on her side into being OF brainwashed.

 

Another reason for being a Jambo is the feeling you get when we win a trophy. The only satisfaction the OF get from winning trophies is knowing they beat their rivals to another title, however when Hearts win a trophy it really makes u proud to be a Jambo.

 

I would rather keep things the way they are and keep going to Tynecastle every other week, even in the winter months when theyre's minus temperatures and heavy rain and even if the team play terrible and lose to teams like St. Mirren, Kilmarnock etc. It's alot better than being an armchair supporter for a team of overpaid, overrated diddies who win every week.

 

OF supporters always moan about the wee things like not spending big on players, how can they do that when theyre the ones winning every trophy. Us supporters of lesser teams get behind the lads and rarely moan win, lose or draw.

 

So that is why I am Jambo:10900:

 

:bravo:

 

top post :10900:

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chester copperpot

It fills me with pride to see my son kick about a football with his mates, they've all got Cellik or Rangers tops on, but the wee mans out there kicking their ass with a Hearts strip on.

 

Vewy pwoud.

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I'm a twenty-three year old Canadian ex-pat who moved to Edinburgh two years ago to find out more about where my Mum is from. When I moved here, I thought 'soccer' was a load of rubbish, and was potentially the biggest waste of time, money, and energy going. I of course supported ice hockey, and still do keep my die-hard roots with my Canadian hockey club of choice, so to move to a place where there's no hockey worried me to say the least.

 

I moved to Green territory off the bat, without knowing it, living in Pilrig, and was still quite adament that football was rubbish, though I couldn't help but notice how much attention people paid to it on a daily basis. In the streets, on mobiles, on shop front windows, on lunchbreaks, on the bus... everywhere, people were chatting about the OF, and the Edinburgh clubs... Words about Gordon's move to Sunderland were everywhere, and I was starting to realise that not only was football a game, but it was more of a passion than anything else. I decided to give it a shot...

 

I asked one of the lads I worked with if he would mind taking me to see a game, as I was quite concerned about all the football violence, and hooliganism that you hear of. There were chats in the office about how I would be lucky to escape the game without getting strung up by away supporters, for I would be lucky enough to start my football supporting 'career' by seeing the bhoys come to Tynecastle. I would be lying if I said I wasn't a bit apprehensive about the whole thing, but it was such a rush to be living 'on the edge' over something as silly (don't think it's silly anymore) as a Mitre football.

 

We got tickets beside the Away supporters, in the so-called family zone, and I was told that because this would be my first football experience, we'd do it 'right'. My mate picked me up at 10am, and I was bursting with excitement. We made our way back to his to get the tickets, and then walked to the Westfield for a few pints... hold up... at 10am? You're damn right! We were three deep at the bar at 10:30 in the morning to get a pint... maybe, just maybe this could turn out to be something I would grow to like.

 

After meeting some of his mates, some of which weren't allowed to take in the sights and sounds of Tynecastle due to ongoing legal issues, I was told it was time to make our way to the park... as we started walking down Gorgie in a crowd of hundreds, I heard the faint noise of shouting coming from the rear. The sound grew louder, and before I knew it, a coach had caught up to us, though was slowed in the foot traffic around it. Through the windows were a plethora of green and white scarves, clovers, and a couple dozen neds going absolutely mental shaking the bus, pounding on the windows, singing, and shouting abuse at the hundreds of maroon sweaters surrounding them. This was my first taste of a passion for football, and even more-so, the first time I started to doubt what I was doing. I began to feel a little bit like a lamb headed for slaughter, completely ignorant to what I was going to see, hear, and feel when this all kicked off. It felt more like I was headed to the front lines of a war, rather than a sporting event...

 

They kicked off at something like 12:30, and soon after, songs started bouncing off the walls of Tynecastle, and I found myself immersed in an ocean of maroon, bouyantly singing in unison words to a song that managed to insult the opposition, the oppositions supporters, and the players themselves... now that was a talent! All thw while, I found myself surrounded by people shouting abuse at the referee, the players, each other... what a place to be on this very weekend!

 

As I remember it, I think the tims went up 1-0 just past half-time. I knew nothing of Celtic, but knew that along with Rangers, they were likely to be the biggest opposition I could have been watching, so to see a nil-nil draw by halftime was an achievement, and was worth celebrating. As the second half kicked off, the atmosphere was punctured with a goal from the green side. Having said that, it wasn't long after that the songs started again, again, such an incredible place to be, nevermind the fact that I could see the castle in the background!

 

Nearing the 90 minute mark, it was still 1-0 to the bad, and I was beginning to wonder if I wouldn't be watching what a celebration looked like for a goal from the home side... enter injury time! At the far end of the pitch, I checked my watch at the 91' mark, and watched a maroon jersey get dropped to the ground inside what I thought was a huge 'goalie crease', which was of course the 18 yard box, and meant that someone was going to the spot. Forgive me, as I don't remember names, but as I remember it, Velicka stepped up, and you could cut the tension with a knife. Even I knew what seemed to be riding on this... stealing even a point from the Old firm could make a world of difference to the city of Edinburgh on that given day. Velicka approached the ball, put his foot through it, and sent the keeper in the opposite direction, GOAL to Hearts!

 

Tynecastle erupted, and before I realised the ball was in the net, my mate was at the line of stewards holding in the away support. I was hugging and shaking fists at people I'd never even seen before, so excited, so relieved, and so passionate about something I thought I didn't even care about... lesson learned!

 

It may have only been a 1-1 draw with Celtic, but it was my first game, and the first time I had ever given half a thought to football. I have never looked back! I attended eight games last term, and have only been to one this young season, but have followed them on the telly, radio, and net throughout. I love my team, because they're mine. I look forward to every weekend, because there are genuine issues with the squad. What fun is it being the pretend manager for a club whose biggest issue is which ?5m international they should play. I like belonging to a club that is real. I love knowing that I shop in the same places, and eat in the same restaurants as the players I follow, and what I love most about Hearts is that I now live on Dalry, and feel as though I live in Jambo country. Week in, and week out we have a team that competes. We have a team surrounded by issues, but that's what makes it special to me, seeing that despite our inability to score goals, we can beat a European League Champ (albeit Croatian) 2-0, with a view to have tied/beaten them on aggregate.

 

I will be a Hearts supporter for the rest of my life. I live in Edinburgh, I support an Edinburgh team for 52 weeks of the year, and I wouldn't have it any other way! Through trials and tribulations, the JTs are my team, and I look forward to that 1-0 win over Kilmarnock the same as I do a win over Hibs at Easter Road, okay, maybe slightly less, but I love it just the same!

 

To put it in prespective, when I started supporting Hearts, I don't think I watched them win until they pulled out an absolutely undeserved 1-0 win over Hamilton at my fourth or fifth game. I still loved every second of it!

 

Thanks for giving me something to be passionate about in this fine city, and I look forward to further success, and further failure just the same. A gangster rapper once said: "Sunny days wouldn't be special, if it wasn't for rain, and

joy wouldn't feel so good, if it wasn't for pain'. He was absolutely right... supporting a football club should be an emotional rollercoaster, I imagine the knack of winning the league every year, or two would wear off quite quickly.

 

Let's have a good year, score some goals, and get ready for another European campaign next year!

 

MON THE JAMBOS!

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chester copperpot
I'm a twenty-three year old Canadian ex-pat who moved to Edinburgh two years ago to find out more about where my Mum is from. When I moved here, I thought 'soccer' was a load of rubbish, and was potentially the biggest waste of time, money, and energy going. I of course supported ice hockey, and still do keep my die-hard roots with my Canadian hockey club of choice, so to move to a place where there's no hockey worried me to say the least.

 

I moved to Green territory off the bat, without knowing it, living in Pilrig, and was still quite adament that football was rubbish, though I couldn't help but notice how much attention people paid to it on a daily basis. In the streets, on mobiles, on shop front windows, on lunchbreaks, on the bus... everywhere, people were chatting about the OF, and the Edinburgh clubs... Words about Gordon's move to Sunderland were everywhere, and I was starting to realise that not only was football a game, but it was more of a passion than anything else. I decided to give it a shot...

 

I asked one of the lads I worked with if he would mind taking me to see a game, as I was quite concerned about all the football violence, and hooliganism that you hear of. There were chats in the office about how I would be lucky to escape the game without getting strung up by away supporters, for I would be lucky enough to start my football supporting 'career' by seeing the bhoys come to Tynecastle. I would be lying if I said I wasn't a bit apprehensive about the whole thing, but it was such a rush to be living 'on the edge' over something as silly (don't think it's silly anymore) as a Mitre football.

 

We got tickets beside the Away supporters, in the so-called family zone, and I was told that because this would be my first football experience, we'd do it 'right'. My mate picked me up at 10am, and I was bursting with excitement. We made our way back to his to get the tickets, and then walked to the Westfield for a few pints... hold up... at 10am? You're damn right! We were three deep at the bar at 10:30 in the morning to get a pint... maybe, just maybe this could turn out to be something I would grow to like.

 

After meeting some of his mates, some of which weren't allowed to take in the sights and sounds of Tynecastle due to ongoing legal issues, I was told it was time to make our way to the park... as we started walking down Gorgie in a crowd of hundreds, I heard the faint noise of shouting coming from the rear. The sound grew louder, and before I knew it, a coach had caught up to us, though was slowed in the foot traffic around it. Through the windows were a plethora of green and white scarves, clovers, and a couple dozen neds going absolutely mental shaking the bus, pounding on the windows, singing, and shouting abuse at the hundreds of maroon sweaters surrounding them. This was my first taste of a passion for football, and even more-so, the first time I started to doubt what I was doing. I began to feel a little bit like a lamb headed for slaughter, completely ignorant to what I was going to see, hear, and feel when this all kicked off. It felt more like I was headed to the front lines of a war, rather than a sporting event...

 

They kicked off at something like 12:30, and soon after, songs started bouncing off the walls of Tynecastle, and I found myself immersed in an ocean of maroon, bouyantly singing in unison words to a song that managed to insult the opposition, the oppositions supporters, and the players themselves... now that was a talent! All thw while, I found myself surrounded by people shouting abuse at the referee, the players, each other... what a place to be on this very weekend!

 

As I remember it, I think the tims went up 1-0 just past half-time. I knew nothing of Celtic, but knew that along with Rangers, they were likely to be the biggest opposition I could have been watching, so to see a nil-nil draw by halftime was an achievement, and was worth celebrating. As the second half kicked off, the atmosphere was punctured with a goal from the green side. Having said that, it wasn't long after that the songs started again, again, such an incredible place to be, nevermind the fact that I could see the castle in the background!

 

Nearing the 90 minute mark, it was still 1-0 to the bad, and I was beginning to wonder if I wouldn't be watching what a celebration looked like for a goal from the home side... enter injury time! At the far end of the pitch, I checked my watch at the 91' mark, and watched a maroon jersey get dropped to the ground inside what I thought was a huge 'goalie crease', which was of course the 18 yard box, and meant that someone was going to the spot. Forgive me, as I don't remember names, but as I remember it, Velicka stepped up, and you could cut the tension with a knife. Even I knew what seemed to be riding on this... stealing even a point from the Old firm could make a world of difference to the city of Edinburgh on that given day. Velicka approached the ball, put his foot through it, and sent the keeper in the opposite direction, GOAL to Hearts!

 

Tynecastle erupted, and before I realised the ball was in the net, my mate was at the line of stewards holding in the away support. I was hugging and shaking fists at people I'd never even seen before, so excited, so relieved, and so passionate about something I thought I didn't even care about... lesson learned!

 

It may have only been a 1-1 draw with Celtic, but it was my first game, and the first time I had ever given half a thought to football. I have never looked back! I attended eight games last term, and have only been to one this young season, but have followed them on the telly, radio, and net throughout. I love my team, because they're mine. I look forward to every weekend, because there are genuine issues with the squad. What fun is it being the pretend manager for a club whose biggest issue is which ?5m international they should play. I like belonging to a club that is real. I love knowing that I shop in the same places, and eat in the same restaurants as the players I follow, and what I love most about Hearts is that I now live on Dalry, and feel as though I live in Jambo country. Week in, and week out we have a team that competes. We have a team surrounded by issues, but that's what makes it special to me, seeing that despite our inability to score goals, we can beat a European League Champ (albeit Croatian) 2-0, with a view to have tied/beaten them on aggregate.

 

I will be a Hearts supporter for the rest of my life. I live in Edinburgh, I support an Edinburgh team for 52 weeks of the year, and I wouldn't have it any other way! Through trials and tribulations, the JTs are my team, and I look forward to that 1-0 win over Kilmarnock the same as I do a win over Hibs at Easter Road, okay, maybe slightly less, but I love it just the same!

 

To put it in prespective, when I started supporting Hearts, I don't think I watched them win until they pulled out an absolutely undeserved 1-0 win over Hamilton at my fourth or fifth game. I still loved every second of it!

 

Thanks for giving me something to be passionate about in this fine city, and I look forward to further success, and further failure just the same. A gangster rapper once said: "Sunny days wouldn't be special, if it wasn't for rain, and

joy wouldn't feel so good, if it wasn't for pain'. He was absolutely right... supporting a football club should be an emotional rollercoaster, I imagine the knack of winning the league every year, or two would wear off quite quickly.

 

Let's have a good year, score some goals, and get ready for another European campaign next year!

 

MON THE JAMBOS!

 

 

 

Best first post ever.

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I'm a twenty-three year old Canadian ex-pat who moved to Edinburgh two years ago to find out more about where my Mum is from. When I moved here, I thought 'soccer' was a load of rubbish, and was potentially the biggest waste of time, money, and energy going. I of course supported ice hockey, and still do keep my die-hard roots with my Canadian hockey club of choice, so to move to a place where there's no hockey worried me to say the least.

 

I moved to Green territory off the bat, without knowing it, living in Pilrig, and was still quite adament that football was rubbish, though I couldn't help but notice how much attention people paid to it on a daily basis. In the streets, on mobiles, on shop front windows, on lunchbreaks, on the bus... everywhere, people were chatting about the OF, and the Edinburgh clubs... Words about Gordon's move to Sunderland were everywhere, and I was starting to realise that not only was football a game, but it was more of a passion than anything else. I decided to give it a shot...

 

I asked one of the lads I worked with if he would mind taking me to see a game, as I was quite concerned about all the football violence, and hooliganism that you hear of. There were chats in the office about how I would be lucky to escape the game without getting strung up by away supporters, for I would be lucky enough to start my football supporting 'career' by seeing the bhoys come to Tynecastle. I would be lying if I said I wasn't a bit apprehensive about the whole thing, but it was such a rush to be living 'on the edge' over something as silly (don't think it's silly anymore) as a Mitre football.

 

We got tickets beside the Away supporters, in the so-called family zone, and I was told that because this would be my first football experience, we'd do it 'right'. My mate picked me up at 10am, and I was bursting with excitement. We made our way back to his to get the tickets, and then walked to the Westfield for a few pints... hold up... at 10am? You're damn right! We were three deep at the bar at 10:30 in the morning to get a pint... maybe, just maybe this could turn out to be something I would grow to like.

 

After meeting some of his mates, some of which weren't allowed to take in the sights and sounds of Tynecastle due to ongoing legal issues, I was told it was time to make our way to the park... as we started walking down Gorgie in a crowd of hundreds, I heard the faint noise of shouting coming from the rear. The sound grew louder, and before I knew it, a coach had caught up to us, though was slowed in the foot traffic around it. Through the windows were a plethora of green and white scarves, clovers, and a couple dozen neds going absolutely mental shaking the bus, pounding on the windows, singing, and shouting abuse at the hundreds of maroon sweaters surrounding them. This was my first taste of a passion for football, and even more-so, the first time I started to doubt what I was doing. I began to feel a little bit like a lamb headed for slaughter, completely ignorant to what I was going to see, hear, and feel when this all kicked off. It felt more like I was headed to the front lines of a war, rather than a sporting event...

 

They kicked off at something like 12:30, and soon after, songs started bouncing off the walls of Tynecastle, and I found myself immersed in an ocean of maroon, bouyantly singing in unison words to a song that managed to insult the opposition, the oppositions supporters, and the players themselves... now that was a talent! All thw while, I found myself surrounded by people shouting abuse at the referee, the players, each other... what a place to be on this very weekend!

 

As I remember it, I think the tims went up 1-0 just past half-time. I knew nothing of Celtic, but knew that along with Rangers, they were likely to be the biggest opposition I could have been watching, so to see a nil-nil draw by halftime was an achievement, and was worth celebrating. As the second half kicked off, the atmosphere was punctured with a goal from the green side. Having said that, it wasn't long after that the songs started again, again, such an incredible place to be, nevermind the fact that I could see the castle in the background!

 

Nearing the 90 minute mark, it was still 1-0 to the bad, and I was beginning to wonder if I wouldn't be watching what a celebration looked like for a goal from the home side... enter injury time! At the far end of the pitch, I checked my watch at the 91' mark, and watched a maroon jersey get dropped to the ground inside what I thought was a huge 'goalie crease', which was of course the 18 yard box, and meant that someone was going to the spot. Forgive me, as I don't remember names, but as I remember it, Velicka stepped up, and you could cut the tension with a knife. Even I knew what seemed to be riding on this... stealing even a point from the Old firm could make a world of difference to the city of Edinburgh on that given day. Velicka approached the ball, put his foot through it, and sent the keeper in the opposite direction, GOAL to Hearts!

 

Tynecastle erupted, and before I realised the ball was in the net, my mate was at the line of stewards holding in the away support. I was hugging and shaking fists at people I'd never even seen before, so excited, so relieved, and so passionate about something I thought I didn't even care about... lesson learned!

 

It may have only been a 1-1 draw with Celtic, but it was my first game, and the first time I had ever given half a thought to football. I have never looked back! I attended eight games last term, and have only been to one this young season, but have followed them on the telly, radio, and net throughout. I love my team, because they're mine. I look forward to every weekend, because there are genuine issues with the squad. What fun is it being the pretend manager for a club whose biggest issue is which ?5m international they should play. I like belonging to a club that is real. I love knowing that I shop in the same places, and eat in the same restaurants as the players I follow, and what I love most about Hearts is that I now live on Dalry, and feel as though I live in Jambo country. Week in, and week out we have a team that competes. We have a team surrounded by issues, but that's what makes it special to me, seeing that despite our inability to score goals, we can beat a European League Champ (albeit Croatian) 2-0, with a view to have tied/beaten them on aggregate.

 

I will be a Hearts supporter for the rest of my life. I live in Edinburgh, I support an Edinburgh team for 52 weeks of the year, and I wouldn't have it any other way! Through trials and tribulations, the JTs are my team, and I look forward to that 1-0 win over Kilmarnock the same as I do a win over Hibs at Easter Road, okay, maybe slightly less, but I love it just the same!

 

To put it in prespective, when I started supporting Hearts, I don't think I watched them win until they pulled out an absolutely undeserved 1-0 win over Hamilton at my fourth or fifth game. I still loved every second of it!

 

Thanks for giving me something to be passionate about in this fine city, and I look forward to further success, and further failure just the same. A gangster rapper once said: "Sunny days wouldn't be special, if it wasn't for rain, and

joy wouldn't feel so good, if it wasn't for pain'. He was absolutely right... supporting a football club should be an emotional rollercoaster, I imagine the knack of winning the league every year, or two would wear off quite quickly.

 

Let's have a good year, score some goals, and get ready for another European campaign next year!

 

MON THE JAMBOS!

 

Spot on post m8

 

Good to hear that when you finally got hooked on the drug that is football, you decided to become a jambo and i agree with everything you said :10900:

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