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jonesy

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One way or another I have been aware of death all my life. As a child a wee girl down the street died of illness, then a boy a friend died when he fell off an Ushers lorry in St Leonards Street getting a canter. Later serving in Egypt the young guardsman in the next bed space to me was murdered by activists, I knew all were dead, but honestly never considered the finality of it nor the fact it would some day involve I.

 

During training for the Edinburgh police, again I witnessed death, first time I ever saw a dead person was on the training trip to the Edinburgh mortuary, again I understood the fact of death, but never really associated it with me or mine. As a beat man in Edinburgh death became a regular occurrence, some violent., some peaceful, some by the deceased's own hand, still it was them not me.

 

Later in life again, I came back to Edinburgh to see my dying mother, helped with the funeral, and later arranged to bring my father to Canada so we could look after him. I subsequently lost him, and then my sister. My birth family all gone.

 

In 2013 our daughter died in a motor vehicle accident, that one was tragic, it hurt, Esther and I grieved together and got through it.  On 2 August 2020, I lost my wife of sixty years, my true love of sixty two years. I have been lucky our son has been a rock for me. As to myself I always had such a good life that death was unacceptable because of its removal of such, there was a time when real young it would terrify me, now I am basically a sad lonely old man, death holds no fear in me, indeed will be welcome, I have had numerous religious comments by relatives, neighbors and others, so far I have been told by a retired doctor that because I don't believe in Jesus as he does I will be going to Turmoil for Eternity, my Jehovahs Witness brother in Law has a whole different belief in the after death experience, when my wife was in the Hospice dying the staff there assured me she was going to join all who had passed before her. The most basic view on death I have heard was my mothers " I'll be glad of the rest" an adage which my wife often quoted in complete agreement, as for me, life as I am now living has such as JKB some pleasures, I will live out my full span, but no longer have any fear or trepidation, you know what, "I will be glad of the  rest".

 

 

 

 

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Auldbenches
22 minutes ago, Sharpie said:

One way or another I have been aware of death all my life. As a child a wee girl down the street died of illness, then a boy a friend died when he fell off an Ushers lorry in St Leonards Street getting a canter. Later serving in Egypt the young guardsman in the next bed space to me was murdered by activists, I knew all were dead, but honestly never considered the finality of it nor the fact it would some day involve I.

 

During training for the Edinburgh police, again I witnessed death, first time I ever saw a dead person was on the training trip to the Edinburgh mortuary, again I understood the fact of death, but never really associated it with me or mine. As a beat man in Edinburgh death became a regular occurrence, some violent., some peaceful, some by the deceased's own hand, still it was them not me.

 

Later in life again, I came back to Edinburgh to see my dying mother, helped with the funeral, and later arranged to bring my father to Canada so we could look after him. I subsequently lost him, and then my sister. My birth family all gone.

 

In 2013 our daughter died in a motor vehicle accident, that one was tragic, it hurt, Esther and I grieved together and got through it.  On 2 August 2020, I lost my wife of sixty years, my true love of sixty two years. I have been lucky our son has been a rock for me. As to myself I always had such a good life that death was unacceptable because of its removal of such, there was a time when real young it would terrify me, now I am basically a sad lonely old man, death holds no fear in me, indeed will be welcome, I have had numerous religious comments by relatives, neighbors and others, so far I have been told by a retired doctor that because I don't believe in Jesus as he does I will be going to Turmoil for Eternity, my Jehovahs Witness brother in Law has a whole different belief in the after death experience, when my wife was in the Hospice dying the staff there assured me she was going to join all who had passed before her. The most basic view on death I have heard was my mothers " I'll be glad of the rest" an adage which my wife often quoted in complete agreement, as for me, life as I am now living has such as JKB some pleasures, I will live out my full span, but no longer have any fear or trepidation, you know what, "I will be glad of the  rest".

 

 

 

 

The religious comments they made there are terrible things for anyone to say.  

What I don't get about jehovah witnesses is they believe that when they die they go to heaven, and when a 144k of them ha e passed away, there will be a hig Flood to clean this place and they are all going to come back to live on a pure planet. 

Hasn't there been a 144k jehovahs died already? 

If they say that some of them mustn't have lived pure lives, then isn't it pointless us becoming one with the lives we've lived compared to them 

Imagine saying that to anyone though.

They spread more fear than love.

 

Edited by Auldbenches
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Boy Daniel

I’m a Christian and I believe in the resurrection of the dead to judgement (Gods judgement no our perception of judgement) 

The final existence for believers who have confessed their sins and accepted Jesus is life on a new earth as the old earth will be gone and there will also be a new Heaven. 
I’m also amazed at the number of people who condemn “religion” and then go on and get everything or certainly most things wrong about Christianity and the Bible in particular. 

Am I frightened to die? With my Christian head on no. However I am enjoying my life at the moment and don’t want to go just yet 

and I praise God for that. 
 

I have also just broken a rule I made for myself not to comment on topics like these as their is a quite ferocious group of posters who just love to get stuck into posters who voice their thoughts on their religion.

 
On that note I’ll say no more. 
 

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Byyy The Light
4 hours ago, Ron Burgundy said:

Terrified of not being around for my kids or being able to help them. Can't really comprehend not ever being here or just not existing. Life is ultimately pointless I suppose and once you're dead it didn't really matter whether your life was wonderful or crap cos you're dead.

That's a bit depressing but that's my take on it.

 

I hope when it comes it's quick as I wouldn't want my kids to have to go through what I saw happen to my parents when they just wasted away with cancer.

 

I've become much more aware of my mortality since I had my girls (now 8 and 5) and I'm also terrified for that reason.

 

A few years ago, I sat in the hospital over Christmas with my 94 year old gran and held her hand pretty much every day for 10 days while she lay incapacitated essentially starving to death.  It was the cruelest thing I have ever had to watch and be a part of, watching this beautiful person pass away in such an undignified manner.  The last 18 months or so of her life she suffered vascular dementia and had umpteen tablets to take every day to stay alive to sit in a chair and not know what the hell was going on.  The whole thing just seemed so unnecessary.  It was very clear the day she was taken in to the hospital this was the end so why did she have to suffer for 10 days.  We don't let it happen to dogs or cats but do for our fellow humans. Being able to take control in that situation would have allowed all our family to be there with her when she passed.  As it turns out my brother wasn't able to be there and still feels guilty about it.  I get there are safe guarding issues but the sooner we reform these laws the better.

 

I know 2 guys at the moment under 40 who have been given terminal cancer diagnosis, can't imagine how you even begin to process that.  Again it's this kind of thing I fear at this stage in my life.  The same with Zal and Doddie Weir. Truly terrifying.

 

I don't believe there is anything after, but people should talk about loved ones and people they've lost as much as possible to keep their memory alive. 

 

 

 

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As another poster alluded to, if it hadn’t been for my wife, I’d probably be gone by now.  She has saved me a few times.

 

As in the OP’s reference to the ‘cat with nine lives’, I’d be down to about 4 by now.  I’m not being morbid but, I’d prefer to go before her for the purely selfish reason that I quite simply couldn’t live without her.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, rudi must stay said:

Never seen this topic on Kickback. The op must have coughed on his weatabix

Would quite happily shuffle off this mortal coil if Weetabix ever became my breakfast of choice. Horrendous stuff. :) 

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rudi must stay
2 minutes ago, jonesy said:

Would quite happily shuffle off this mortal coil if Weetabix ever became my breakfast of choice. Horrendous stuff. :) 

 Nice with sugar 

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25 minutes ago, Morgan said:

As another poster alluded to, if it hadn’t been for my wife, I’d probably be gone by now.  She has saved me a few times.

 

As in the OP’s reference to the ‘cat with nine lives’, I’d be down to about 4 by now.  I’m not being morbid but, I’d prefer to go before her for the purely selfish reason that I quite simply couldn’t live without her.

 

 

Very touching Morgan, and the ultimate compliment you could pay to your good wife.

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luckyBatistuta

Freaks me out if I think of the nothingness. I’m not saying I’m actually scared of it, just weird to think you won’t exist. I don’t believe in the fairy stories. I worry about my parents, watching them getting old us not nice. I hope I never end up in a home, dribbling over myself and getting my arse wiped, hopefully get hit by a big truck. I do hope I go before my wife, as she is a fantastic mother to my kids.  I just hope I also hope I live long enough that my boys will be able to take care of themselves.

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I belive in the afterlife. We will all move on to a different place, I don't think it will be all clouds and angels playing harps, I think it will be a time and place where we were happiest with people that we've lost. I think people that don't accept death or the afterlife become trapped here and that's what makes ghosts. 

 

 

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Mankind's greatest gift, and greatest curse - understanding our mortality.

 

I can't think about it, I don't want to die and it gives me the fear.

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7 hours ago, Ron Burgundy said:

Once something has happened all it is is a memory. Without them we have nothing IMO. Dementia and Alzheimer's are the cruellest disease imaginable .

And I'm not looking for an argument.

Totally agree. My mother in law is now quite bad with dementia. Multiple times a day she asks for the father in law, who passed away 7 years ago. To her, sometimes it is as if he just passed that day. As we live in the next village, 1 of us pops in every evening (currently waiting on a space in a care home) so she usually knows who we are. When the wife's brother was over, he was staying at her house. At 1 point she was about to call the police as she thought she was a burglar.

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jack D and coke
5 hours ago, JamesM48 said:

I find the concept of memory utterly fascinating . What actually is it ? Why do people remember everything from their childhood whereas I remember hardly anything ? It’s probably there somewhere , but why can’t I ? There probably is no answer . For some reason I have an vast knowledge about dates as in anyone’s birthday or What I did on a certain day of memorable enough ! 
 

One of my favourite lines from a film when the character is discussing memory

 

“ memories are meant to fade they are Made that way “ 

 

 

 

 

Cos it’s a bit like a torture. I’ll try find the thing i watched where some people can remember absolutely everything in their lives. There’s one woman who was the Taxi Us sitcom. It’s fascinating but doesn’t sound too good tbh. 
Edit found it

 

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I don’t dread it but dread the thought of me dying and leaving my daughter behind and I do over think that at times.

 

seeing the way my fiancé dealt with being told that there’s nothing more they could do for her and calmly saying “ok”with a wee shrug of her shoulders whilst everyone around her broke down is something I struggle with at times as well, how can someone be so calm in that situation? 
 

As for what happens when you die, well that’s it i think. The end. 
 

 

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Psychedelicropcircle

I’ll be glad to be gone when the time comes. These young snowflakes get right on my tits😀

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33 minutes ago, Irufushi said:

I don’t dread it but dread the thought of me dying and leaving my daughter behind and I do over think that at times.

 

seeing the way my fiancé dealt with being told that there’s nothing more they could do for her and calmly saying “ok”with a wee shrug of her shoulders whilst everyone around her broke down is something I struggle with at times as well, how can someone be so calm in that situation? 
 

As for what happens when you die, well that’s it i think. The end. 
 

 

Your fiancé sounds like she was a wonderfully strong person.  I still, to this day, remember your post about her passing.

 

Hopefully your wee lass will turn into a brave lady like her mum.

 

God bless you.

 

 

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Jambo-Jimbo

When the kids were wee, that was when I did worry about dying, what would happen to the wife and the kids, how would they cope.

Now they are all adults themselves, I don't have any fears now, especially after my own brush with death 10 years ago, and by all accounts I shouldn't have survived, it was impossible to survive, but here I am, so everyday is a bonus, as far as I'm concerned.

 

I'm not religious, and I don't believe in an afterlife, once you're gone you're gone, that's my view.

 

Make the most of the time you have, it can be all over in the blink of an eye, and you never know when that could happen.

 

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AlimOzturk

No point in fearing something that is inevitable. Comes to us all. If we were all immortal then what’s the point in even getting up in the morning as there is always tomorrow or the next day. It’s the mere fact of death that drives us to live and achieve things that are truly extraordinary. I don’t even think of death as truly the endanyways, here is why (a lot of this comes from Listening to Carl Sagan and Neil degrass. 
 

When we die we return to the earth or to the universe in way or another. We just lose our consciousness. We weren’t conscious before we were born so it shouldn’t come as any great surprise that we then lose it when we die. When we are cremated our energy is literally blasted back into the universe.  When we are buried our remains are consumed by the earth, by the worms and other animals. They are then consumed by other animals and so forth. The soil feeds on our energy. And so the life cycle goes on. Energy is never wasted. In fact the universe rarely wastes anything. 
 

Find it comforting that my body goes on in another form and tbh **** living to see the end of days. I can’t see it being pretty. Think I have lived at near the peak of human knowledge and at an incredibly hospitable time for planet earth and even humanity as whole (going on human history) still got a lot of living to do though and hopefully have a long time of decent health and prosperity. 

Edited by AlimOzturk
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10 hours ago, JamesM48 said:

“ I’m not afraid of dying I just don’t want to be there when it happens “  

 

Woody Allen 

 

Wish that paedo ***** would die.

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RustyRightPeg

Terrifies me if I’m honest. I’m still young (27) and I just feel very uncomfortable about the whole thing.

 

I’m currently watching the Schumacher documentary and there’s obviously speculation about the current state of his body and it just leads me into how I want to go. I certainly don’t want to get into a vegetive state but I also don’t want a sudden passing as I’ve suffered one in my family and know how devastating it is. I’d like to see the people I love beforehand.
 

I don’t believe in heaven or hell I just personally think it’s a sleep you don’t ever wake up from. Very strange subject isn’t it.  

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2 hours ago, Irufushi said:

I don’t dread it but dread the thought of me dying and leaving my daughter behind and I do over think that at times.

 

seeing the way my fiancé dealt with being told that there’s nothing more they could do for her and calmly saying “ok”with a wee shrug of her shoulders whilst everyone around her broke down is something I struggle with at times as well, how can someone be so calm in that situation? 
 

As for what happens when you die, well that’s it i think. The end. 
 

 

My dad was similar when he was told his cancer was terminal. I honestly feel it was because deep down he already knew it before the doctor told him. My mother, sister and myself really struggled when we were told.

My mum was with him when the consultant told him. My dad being my dad turned to my mother and said, still sitting with the consultant, "I think I can cash in my life insurance now we know its terminal. I'm not needing the cash but it will save us 20 quid a month".

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13 hours ago, Victorian said:

The best thing to do is decide,  like Capt. James T. Kirk that you've always known that you'll die alone and like,  never be alone at any time.  Albeit that may involve a bit of major lifestyle choice in terms of lavatorial habits,  etc.  

 

In Ireland there is a concept called "fód an bháis", which literally translates as "sod of death".  The idea is that there is a place in which it is pre-ordained that you must die - whereas it is common in other cultures to refer to a time or day of death.  There's an old Irish proverb which says "níl a fhios ag éinne cá bhfuil fód a bháis", or "no one knows where his sod of death is".  There's a short story about a fella who by some fluke learns where his sod of death is, and spends his life ensuring that he avoids it - until one day the piece of ground lifts itself out of the land, flies to where he is standing and jams itself beneath his feet, whereupon he dies. 

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Georgecowie
9 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

Freaks me out if I think of the nothingness. I’m not saying I’m actually scared of it, just weird to think you won’t exist. I don’t believe in the fairy stories. I worry about my parents, watching them getting old us not nice. I hope I never end up in a home, dribbling over myself and getting my arse wiped, hopefully get hit by a big truck. I do hope I go before my wife, as she is a fantastic mother to my kids.  I just hope I also hope I live long enough that my boys will be able to take care of themselves.

So you were at that St Johnstone game before Levein got the chop as well. Harrowing. 

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Maple Leaf
17 hours ago, jonesy said:

Just checked deathclock.com - only got 12 years left :( !

 

You're lucky.  I just checked that website and got the message "I'm sorry, but your time has expired." :confused:

 

 

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1 hour ago, Maple Leaf said:

 

You're lucky.  I just checked that website and got the message "I'm sorry, but your time has expired." :confused:

 

 

Reminds me of the time during lockdown, when I weighed myself and the scales told me to get the feck off.

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2 hours ago, Maple Leaf said:

 

You're lucky.  I just checked that website and got the message "I'm sorry, but your time has expired." :confused:

 

 

They walk among us…

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20 hours ago, jonesy said:

Plenty of it about at the moment. Seen a few September 11th documentaries recently, and the footage of the planes, just before they hit the tower, are hard to comprehend. Then there's the ol' Covid. Lost someone close to us recently. And then woke up to the news that my favourite comedian, Norm MacDonald, had died.

 

What's everyone's take... Are you scared of it? Do you welcome it? Is there a 'best' way to go? What happens afterwards? Have you had a particularly poignant or traumatic experience in connection with it? Do you believe in reincarnation/afterlife? Any good death jokes? And for the cats on the board, how many of your nine lives have you got left?

 

:th_dead:

Best way? See John Entwistle. :D

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6 hours ago, Ulysses said:

 

In Ireland there is a concept called "fód an bháis", which literally translates as "sod of death".  The idea is that there is a place in which it is pre-ordained that you must die - whereas it is common in other cultures to refer to a time or day of death.  There's an old Irish proverb which says "níl a fhios ag éinne cá bhfuil fód a bháis", or "no one knows where his sod of death is".  There's a short story about a fella who by some fluke learns where his sod of death is, and spends his life ensuring that he avoids it - until one day the piece of ground lifts itself out of the land, flies to where he is standing and jams itself beneath his feet, whereupon he dies. 

 

Sod's Law.

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John Findlay
7 hours ago, Ulysses said:

 

In Ireland there is a concept called "fód an bháis", which literally translates as "sod of death".  The idea is that there is a place in which it is pre-ordained that you must die - whereas it is common in other cultures to refer to a time or day of death.  There's an old Irish proverb which says "níl a fhios ag éinne cá bhfuil fód a bháis", or "no one knows where his sod of death is".  There's a short story about a fella who by some fluke learns where his sod of death is, and spends his life ensuring that he avoids it - until one day the piece of ground lifts itself out of the land, flies to where he is standing and jams itself beneath his feet, whereupon he dies. 

Basically death comes to us all.

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jack D and coke
7 hours ago, Ulysses said:

 

 

 

 

Jesus that song gets me every single time. Noel or Liam singing it. 
“Maybe I will never be all the things I wanna be, now is not the time to cry nows the time to find out why” 

Their best song. 

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2 minutes ago, jack D and coke said:

Jesus that song gets me every single time. Noel or Liam singing it. 
“Maybe I will never be all the things I wanna be, now is not the time to cry nows the time to find out why” 

Their best song. 

 

Stevie's where it's at when it comes to punching you in the soul

 

 

 

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AlimOzturk
15 hours ago, Morgan said:

As another poster alluded to, if it hadn’t been for my wife, I’d probably be gone by now.  She has saved me a few times.

 

As in the OP’s reference to the ‘cat with nine lives’, I’d be down to about 4 by now.  I’m not being morbid but, I’d prefer to go before her for the purely selfish reason that I quite simply couldn’t live without her.

 

 


I am the same man. Couldn’t live without my wife. Love her and my kids and without them I wouldn’t have much a of a life I don’t think. 

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Harry Potter
21 hours ago, Seymour M Hersh said:

Awaits us all. 

This, its the one certainty in life, what really hurts me is when young folk are taken too

soon.   

Edited by Harry Potter
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8 hours ago, Ulysses said:

 

In Ireland there is a concept called "fód an bháis", which literally translates as "sod of death".  The idea is that there is a place in which it is pre-ordained that you must die - whereas it is common in other cultures to refer to a time or day of death.  There's an old Irish proverb which says "níl a fhios ag éinne cá bhfuil fód a bháis", or "no one knows where his sod of death is".  There's a short story about a fella who by some fluke learns where his sod of death is, and spends his life ensuring that he avoids it - until one day the piece of ground lifts itself out of the land, flies to where he is standing and jams itself beneath his feet, whereupon he dies. 

The message I’m getting here is to stop buying Irish peat for my gardening endeavours. Y’know, just in case.

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Bull's-eye
20 minutes ago, Harry Potter said:

This, its the one certainty in life, what really hurts me is when young folk are taken too

soon.   

Child_Catcher.jpg.4b34657f519c329a0f78cf08c9d3bc3a.jpg

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Jambo-Jimbo
11 hours ago, superjack said:

My dad was similar when he was told his cancer was terminal. I honestly feel it was because deep down he already knew it before the doctor told him. My mother, sister and myself really struggled when we were told.

My mum was with him when the consultant told him. My dad being my dad turned to my mother and said, still sitting with the consultant, "I think I can cash in my life insurance now we know its terminal. I'm not needing the cash but it will save us 20 quid a month".

 

My dad was the same, walking towards the consultants office he turned to me and said "This is where they tell me that I'm dying" and when he got the news, complete calm, he asked how long, told a few months, my dad said no BS doc how long, weeks was the reply, he lasted 5 weeks.

 

My dad was of the generation that death was virtually a taboo subject, nobody talked about it and yes he used to be terrified by it, but after my mum died he was less so.  In his last weeks he planned his funeral and all that sort of stuff, he wanted all his affairs in order and that's the way it all turned out.

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The Frenchman Returns

In the last month I have attended 3 funerals, 2 of which were for people of my generation. Brings home that time is short. 
 

Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think 
Enjoy yourself, while you're still in the pink 
The years go by, as quickly as you wink 
Enjoy yourself, enjoy yourself, it's later than you think

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Jambo-Jimbo
10 minutes ago, The Frenchman Returns said:

In the last month I have attended 3 funerals, 2 of which were for people of my generation. Brings home that time is short. 
 

Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think 
Enjoy yourself, while you're still in the pink 
The years go by, as quickly as you wink 
Enjoy yourself, enjoy yourself, it's later than you think

 

The public notice board in my town where the death notices are posted, 10 years ago there'd be the odd one or two you might have known, nowadays it seems like every other death notice is someone you know or even went to school with.

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10 hours ago, Ulysses said:

 

In Ireland there is a concept called "fód an bháis", which literally translates as "sod of death".  The idea is that there is a place in which it is pre-ordained that you must die - whereas it is common in other cultures to refer to a time or day of death.  There's an old Irish proverb which says "níl a fhios ag éinne cá bhfuil fód a bháis", or "no one knows where his sod of death is".  There's a short story about a fella who by some fluke learns where his sod of death is, and spends his life ensuring that he avoids it - until one day the piece of ground lifts itself out of the land, flies to where he is standing and jams itself beneath his feet, whereupon he dies. 

 

Those folk who have died on top of Everest may have had the dying thought "Of all the places on Earth I just had to avoid..."

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Auld Reekin'
11 hours ago, Ulysses said:

 

In Ireland there is a concept called "fód an bháis", which literally translates as "sod of death".  The idea is that there is a place in which it is pre-ordained that you must die - whereas it is common in other cultures to refer to a time or day of death.  There's an old Irish proverb which says "níl a fhios ag éinne cá bhfuil fód a bháis", or "no one knows where his sod of death is".  There's a short story about a fella who by some fluke learns where his sod of death is, and spends his life ensuring that he avoids it - until one day the piece of ground lifts itself out of the land, flies to where he is standing and jams itself beneath his feet, whereupon he dies. 

 

Hate it when that happens.  

 

Fód that for a game of fódjers...

Edited by Auld Reekin'
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Ted (Theodore) Logan
On 15/09/2021 at 11:23, Beni said:

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS0Ed92HtZFcVnrdFS8heS

😆 

I thought of this when I read that too. Think there was a gif of this rant going around at one time

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