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Sharpie

Just saw results of a poll in the United States where the question was  Is dramatic change required in the police. The general answer seemed to be yes. I agree to an extent, recent happenings indicate this. Shootings are rife and it definitely seems less than necessary. Where do the changes get made though is to me the $20,000 question.

In my latter days in Edinburgh there seemed to be a tendency to higher level education as a requisite for management. In the States just seeing on the news the number of examples of racial diversity in those holding such a position, it seems that the selection of leaders has changed considerably, there is no doubt an old polis makes a good old polis boss as it was in my early days, but todays policing is different, I even found that out in 1967. As a result i went into a frenzy of post secondary education at College level, but I still had my old police background, and it was an asset.

 

I am an advocate of ethnic advancement, surprising I am sure to some on here, but I have met so many good people, and competent people of all backgrounds it is not a problem,I have no prejudice as long as they are not an illegal drug user. The United States is quite different in my stay at a major law enforcement American I saw numerous actions, by both sides of racial prejudice. I can understand how there may be some adverse reactions in respect, discipline, and attitude if it has not changed into todays environment. I have even heard in the last few nights suggestions that the police as a whole be disbanded. What would replace them. 

 

I no doubt surprisingly have no real suggestion. I am still a product of my Guards training, do what you are told, keep your tongue between your teeth, and get on with your job. But I see criticism of the Met, and even the Police whatever they are called now, Edinburgh, Lothians or Scottish Police, do non police persons have any idea what changes should be made or even what they  would like to see. the problem is particularly in the States lack of a purpose could lead to Anarchy.  As the boss when someone came and complained about something I would often ask so what have you done to change the situation. 

 Any suggestions out there, and no need to tell me where to put my question that mail box is already totally full.

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Also released this week was a report by an international panel of experts that concluded that in the USA, police violence against and killings of non-whites constitutes a crime against humanity.

 

The USA is committing war crimes against its own people.

The panel goes as far as to send a recommendation to the International Criminal Court in The Hague to pursue certain cases under these charges.

That is a shocking turn of events.

The USA has always been racist and it was only a few decades ago that public lynchings were still going on.

 

https://inquirycommission.org/website/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Commission-Report-15-April.pdf

 

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davemclaren
5 minutes ago, Greedy Jambo said:

I kind of regret not joining the police, decent money for being a moron.

You would have done well. 😎

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davemclaren

I think a big problem is that, as I heard on tv recently, there are circa 20,000 police forces in the US ranging from federal, state and then more local and smaller forces. Some Sheriffs are still apparently elected which is crazy imo. I think the diversity in police forces makes any standards and professional development difficult to enforce and maintain.  

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Greedy Jambo
4 minutes ago, davemclaren said:

You would have done well. 😎

 

You're coming out your shell now are you no haha. love it. 

 

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dobmisterdobster
3 minutes ago, davemclaren said:

I think a big problem is that, as I heard on tv recently, there are circa 20,000 police forces in the US ranging from federal, state and then more local and smaller forces. Some Sheriffs are still apparently elected which is crazy imo. I think the diversity in police forces makes any standards and professional development difficult to enforce and maintain.  

 

Why is this a problem? Different states have different laws.

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davemclaren
Just now, dobmisterdobster said:

 

Why is this a problem? Different states have different laws.

They do but I still think it’s too fragmented.  There’s only 50 states and one district. 

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davemclaren
Just now, Greedy Jambo said:

ohhh shit, dave has been questioned. 

 

Straight ban in my opinion. 

You’re safe for the moment. 

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Greedy Jambo

You can't ban a guy that plays the guitar mate. 

That's just going too far. 

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dobmisterdobster
1 minute ago, davemclaren said:

They do but I still think it’s too fragmented.  There’s only 50 states and one district. 

 

State police and highway patrols have enough on their plate without taking on municipal roles.

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davemclaren
Just now, dobmisterdobster said:

 

State police and highway patrols have enough on their plate without taking on municipal roles.

As I said, the vast number of forces, all with separate accountabilities must make it hard to ensure consistent standards. All my opinion of course but re-I forced by what some US police ‘expert’ was saying on BBC news last week. 
 

The UK has about 50 police forces in comparison. 
 

 

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davemclaren
7 minutes ago, Greedy Jambo said:

You can't ban a guy that plays the guitar mate. 

That's just going too far. 

🎸

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JackLadd

Policing here and in the U.S is of little compare. 4.8 guns per 100 people in UK vs 121 per 100 in the U.S. 

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dobmisterdobster
9 minutes ago, davemclaren said:

As I said, the vast number of forces, all with separate accountabilities must make it hard to ensure consistent standards. All my opinion of course but re-I forced by what some US police ‘expert’ was saying on BBC news last week. 
 

The UK has about 50 police forces in comparison. 
 

 

 

Standards set by who? That's what I want to know.

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davemclaren
Just now, dobmisterdobster said:

 

Standards set by who? That's what I want to know.

I suppose that’s the challenge in the States with the Federal structure. What’s your thoughts on the current issues policing is facing there and potential solutions then?

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highlandjambo3
12 hours ago, Greedy Jambo said:

I kind of regret not joining the police, decent money for being a moron.

As apposed to doing it for free 😉

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Mikey1874

I respect people who take an interest in other countries. George Floyd trial was interesting. Partly as no Police in UK ever get prosecuted. 

 

But I'd recommend people pay attention to what is happening near to them. 

 

If OP is in North America then get involved with the people there. 

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Sawdust Caesar
12 hours ago, davemclaren said:

I think a big problem is that, as I heard on tv recently, there are circa 20,000 police forces in the US ranging from federal, state and then more local and smaller forces. Some Sheriffs are still apparently elected which is crazy imo. I think the diversity in police forces makes any standards and professional development difficult to enforce and maintain.  

That might not be that crazy because if they are doing a bad job then they get voted out of office, they are answerable to the citizens of that town/area. 

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davemclaren
3 minutes ago, Sawdust Caesar said:

That might not be that crazy because if they are doing a bad job then they get voted out of office, they are answerable to the citizens of that town/area. 

You are, but to populist views I imagine. Not a fan. 

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ri Alban

The Police, like Religion aren't the problem, it's some of the humans that practice it, wrongfully. 

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Sharpie
1 hour ago, Mikey1874 said:

I respect people who take an interest in other countries. George Floyd trial was interesting. Partly as no Police in UK ever get prosecuted. 

 

But I'd recommend people pay attention to what is happening near to them. 

 

If OP is in North America then get involved with the people there. 

 

I apologise if I have submitted a thread that is inappropriate geographically , having participated in JKB in numerous forms for something in the area  of twenty years I did not realise my impropriety. I seem to recall having read comments, opinions and criticisms about places as diverse as from Mozambique to Penicuik without correction of location to discuss. As a reader I have read comments here about policing in Edinburgh, Canada,United States, recently some harsh criticism about a Police Force, London Metropolitan Police who for many years held a position of prestige throughout the World as the example for efficient policing, in fact many from other countries spent time looking just to see a London Bobby, that reputation is no longer intact. Yesterday I saw a poll in the United States suggesting that the police system be dramatically changed and some even voted to have it removed totally. Being curious and having read in here that people were dissatisfied with some police activity or non activity in their respective jurisdictions they could perhaps advise me of some changes that would revive public confidence, I did so out of personal interest with no intention of stealing anyones ideas. 

I must say it is the first time I can draw to mind anyone being told on JKB to get into their own backyard, and get involved there and not involve the good people of JKB in Edinburgh. If this is a parochial adaption in JKB sadly if true I will suffer a great loss of a long time interest.

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1 hour ago, Sawdust Caesar said:

That might not be that crazy because if they are doing a bad job then they get voted out of office, they are answerable to the citizens of that town/area. 


The bigger issue is more that the local policing that sits under elected officials is also subject to local funding, I remember watching the documentary about the city of Flint where water poisoning took up all the city funding meaning that the mayor was sacking police in order to fund clean water, as a result Flint had one of the highest crime rates in the US. 
 

Surely a federally funded minimum standard of policing would at least improve the standard of both training and numbers of police? There were officers in flint that spent more time maintaining vocational skills than they did their police training as they knew there was every chance they would need to find another job sometime soon.

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redjambo

The use of bodycams (which should be made mandatory for all police, imo) and the proliferation of mobile phones have been the game-changers. Much of what goes on now has gone on for a long time, but now it's very much in the public eye. The police will have to change their historic approaches because of that, and that's a good thing.

 

The other thing that needs to change is the over-protection of police who have done wrong. As one example, the police officers in the US recently who violently arrested an elderly dementia patient and laughed afterwards at the video of her shoulder audibly popping out (link below) would have been sacked straight away in my books.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/27/us/loveland-police-video-karen-garner.html

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Sharpie

I agree in my books also, disgusting reprehensible and automatic termination. This is the type of thing that cause the subject poll and results. The recent actions in London written about here are a similar symptom of police actions, and I personally have no idea what has caused the attitude. If the Chauvin case though is any indication I would without proper evidence allot some responsibility on police managements lacking in courage to impose serious punishment on disciplinary offenders. Eighteen in Chauvins case disciplinary offences with minimal consequences, until his present jeopardy.

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Maple Leaf

Having a common set of standards across all police forces in the country is a good way to get consistency, but that is almost impossible to achieve in the USA with approx 20,000 independent police forces.

 

It's not as if the Americans are over policed.  They have 240 officers per 100,000 population, which is the worldwide average.  The UK has 211 per 100,000 and Canada has 183.

 

The lack of gun controls in the USA is major factor, imo, and the laws are more likely to be loosened than tightened  with a Second Amendment- friendly Supreme Court. 

 

The adversarial situation between the police and the non-white community has existed for a long time and there is unlikely to be any meaningful change, despite the good intentions of some people on both sides.

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Footballfirst

Just as well that PC Kemp wasn't carrying a gun, by the sounds of it.

 

 

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Der Kaiser
6 minutes ago, Footballfirst said:

Just as well that PC Kemp wasn't carrying a gun, by the sounds of it.

 

 

 

There's a part of me that could be sympathetic to the police in this instance albeit I know very little of the incident. 

 

I teach kids with learning disabilities and we can see some incredibly challenging behaviour which unfortunately does result in very rare instances of staff being hurt quite badly (and I include me in that). It's something I'm quite confident at dealing with now but it's incredibly stressful when you have someone who goes from 0-100 and their behaviour is harmful and dangerous and you find yourself doing everything you can to de-escalate all the time conscious of not doing anything to hurt the youngster.

 

The police surely do considerably more training in areas of restraint than I have to do but ultimately the main thing we share is that keeping everyone safe during an incident is the priority. Sometimes the best action is doing nothing....stepping away....move others out of danger and accepting that there may be damage to property and try and let things fizzle out.

 

It does look like this is a police officer who has been out his depth in dealing with the situation. 34 baton strikes does show he has completely lost control. I dont know what level of learning disability the young lassie had but ultimately my experience has taught me you do a minimum of everything because you can make a situation 100 times worse if you try to restrain someone who is very upset. Also, when some young folk have been angry or upset it can take the best part of an hour to be calm and settled.

 

The cop has either not been trained to cope with this or is just very heavy handed and extremely unprofessional. 

 

Or more likely its both.

 

 

 

 

 

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Sharpie

One common factor that seems to come up in most cases is training. In Chauvin the evidence at Trial given about training in amount was impressive, but the results were not so. Thirty seven baton strikes is to me a thirty six year policeman are just amazing. Actually using a baton under the stated circumstances is to me unacceptable, but I am old school. It was suggested earlier that I go back basically where I come from and help there, but the problems of police what to me is misconduct is international and worthy of discussion. The solutions are not the same everywhere but there are some that are significantly similar.

In my old Edinburgh days if you were identified as having used your baton thirty seven times to control any prisoner you would have ben ridiculed and laughed out of the job.

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otterjohn
11 hours ago, Der Kaiser said:

 

There's a part of me that could be sympathetic to the police in this instance albeit I know very little of the incident. 

 

I teach kids with learning disabilities and we can see some incredibly challenging behaviour which unfortunately does result in very rare instances of staff being hurt quite badly (and I include me in that). It's something I'm quite confident at dealing with now but it's incredibly stressful when you have someone who goes from 0-100 and their behaviour is harmful and dangerous and you find yourself doing everything you can to de-escalate all the time conscious of not doing anything to hurt the youngster.

 

The police surely do considerably more training in areas of restraint than I have to do but ultimately the main thing we share is that keeping everyone safe during an incident is the priority. Sometimes the best action is doing nothing....stepping away....move others out of danger and accepting that there may be damage to property and try and let things fizzle out.

 

It does look like this is a police officer who has been out his depth in dealing with the situation. 34 baton strikes does show he has completely lost control. I dont know what level of learning disability the young lassie had but ultimately my experience has taught me you do a minimum of everything because you can make a situation 100 times worse if you try to restrain someone who is very upset. Also, when some young folk have been angry or upset it can take the best part of an hour to be calm and settled.

 

The cop has either not been trained to cope with this or is just very heavy handed and extremely unprofessional. 

 

Or more likely its both.

 

 

 

 

 

Great post.Our often Heroic ,little supported police arent in big enough numbers to be trained with everything they have to deal with these days.They do a fantastic job in the main and deserve far more public support.

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The lassie got separated from her group after becoming agitated.

She flagged down a passing police car and was able to explain that she was a vulnerable person with mental health problems and had lost her group.

So far so good.

 

Something then happened to agitate and frighten the young woman and she asked to be allowed to go exit the car and continue on her own.

The police responded to this by trying to cuff her, then CS spraying her then beating the shite out of her with a baton.

Arriving backup officers then also taser her.

Then she was beaten some more.

 

Absolutely atrocious.

Never mind firing the guy, he needs to be prosecuted for assault.

 

*by the way the lassie was black

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redjambo
Posted (edited)
On 28/04/2021 at 14:40, redjambo said:

The use of bodycams (which should be made mandatory for all police, imo) and the proliferation of mobile phones have been the game-changers. Much of what goes on now has gone on for a long time, but now it's very much in the public eye. The police will have to change their historic approaches because of that, and that's a good thing.

 

The other thing that needs to change is the over-protection of police who have done wrong. As one example, the police officers in the US recently who violently arrested an elderly dementia patient and laughed afterwards at the video of her shoulder audibly popping out (link below) would have been sacked straight away in my books.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/27/us/loveland-police-video-karen-garner.html

 

Just a follow-up that three officers involved in the above incident are now no longer employed by the police department.

 

https://www.kktv.com/2021/04/30/three-loveland-police-officers-resign-after-over-arrest-of-woman-with-dementia/

 

https://edition.cnn.com/2021/04/30/us/loveland-police-officers-karen-garner-use-of-force/index.html

Edited by redjambo
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JimmyCant
Posted (edited)

One of the things that totally ruined policing in this country was the fast tracking graduate entry scheme. Within 5 years they stopped recruiting working class lads with a bit of life experience and there was a period where you didn’t get in at all if you didn’t have a degree.

 

Lots of these graduates were inspectors within 4 years in charge of a whole load of other graduates. They all knew the law back to front, but they didn’t know people and they didn’t like what they found. Plus, they didn’t go on the pish and go shaggin on night shift. Spoiled it for everybody !!

Edited by JimmyCant
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Sharpie

I just had a wee bit of the fast promotion system before I left Edinburgh, there were some doozys as a result. I have to admit though that a certain amount of education is advantageous when advancing through the ranks. On gaining promotions I was glad I had spent five years taking Business Administration and French, it enabled me to manage budgets, police, etc. But my years of beat work and down and dirty policing was also quite advantageous when some smart guy thought he could BS the old man. Twelve years on beats in Edinburgh was a second type of post secondary education that wasn't on any night school program.

 

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JimmyCant
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Sharpie said:

I just had a wee bit of the fast promotion system before I left Edinburgh, there were some doozys as a result. I have to admit though that a certain amount of education is advantageous when advancing through the ranks. On gaining promotions I was glad I had spent five years taking Business Administration and French, it enabled me to manage budgets, police, etc. But my years of beat work and down and dirty policing was also quite advantageous when some smart guy thought he could BS the old man. Twelve years on beats in Edinburgh was a second type of post secondary education that wasn't on any night school program.

 

Nothing wrong with education, especially to degree level. In fact nothing wrong with the police recruiting graduates. Two things wrong with what they did though. The first was to almost entirely exclude non graduates for a long period. You had to be an exceptional candidate if you didn’t have a degree. The second was to fast track promote a lot of them to positions of huge responsibility. Not many of them had spent any time rolling about the gutters with drunks in Rose Street. They hadn’t been exposed to the violence, death and despair in the community. The police were always meant to reflect the community they serve. For a good 10-15 years back in the 80’s 90’s they were built to be ‘superior’ to the community and they lost all contact and all trust.

Edited by JimmyCant
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Sharpie
4 hours ago, JimmyCant said:

Nothing wrong with education, especially to degree level. In fact nothing wrong with the police recruiting graduates. Two things wrong with what they did though. The first was to almost entirely exclude non graduates for a long period. You had to be an exceptional candidate if you didn’t have a degree. The second was to fast track promote a lot of them to positions of huge responsibility. Not many of them had spent any time rolling about the gutters with drunks in Rose Street. They hadn’t been exposed to the violence, death and despair in the community. The police were always meant to reflect the community they serve. For a good 10-15 years back in the 80’s 90’s they were built to be ‘superior’ to the community and they lost all contact and all trust.

 

When I was a wee boy about four my father pointed out a man in Clerk Street one day. He said see that man, retired policeman, see his shirt, police issue, see his troosers police issue. Same with his boots and, and he had a free hoose and now a good pension thats what you are going to be, and so it was.  Education was not my strong point, but I did know that service in the Guards was an excellent enhancer, the Guards knew it also and on my soon discharge sent me on a two week course which was programmed fo police entrance.

I was appointed to the Edinburgh City Police in September 1955, three years almost to the day from my enlistment into the Guards. I served as a Pc studied for and passed the sergeants exams. I went through the whole thing, shifts, Niddrie, rolling about fight ing, it was a wonderful ay of life, good friends , good bosses, steady old sergeants, and Divisional Chiefs who had been down the same road, were all policemen of the past.

 

I resigned in 1967 to satisfy a lifetime move to North America. I was reappointed into a Police Department, and was immediately promoted to sergeant, strangely enough my twelve year service was important, but for this particular recruiter  my main asset after twelve years was my Guards service. I was on promotion delegated a squad of policemen. I gathered them and briefed them on what I wanted for them, at one point, at one juncture  young man asked me , why?, I was shocked it was a word I never used to a supervisor. I realised that things had changed, "because I say so" was not sufficient, so I changed and embarked on a program of higher education. It was an excellent idea.

 

As I do I make a long story about a simple response, but I have to be bold and say, my initial background made me an excellent candidate for the 1950's street policeman, my transferrance in the late 1960's to an educated street polis gave me what I needed to become a good commander, with a knowledge of both aspects of police leadership, both are assets, a too large preponderance of one can in a police leader be detrimental. I believe that is an essential weakness of the Service at this time.

 

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EH11_2NL
5 hours ago, JimmyCant said:

Nothing wrong with education, especially to degree level. In fact nothing wrong with the police recruiting graduates. Two things wrong with what they did though. The first was to almost entirely exclude non graduates for a long period. You had to be an exceptional candidate if you didn’t have a degree. The second was to fast track promote a lot of them to positions of huge responsibility. Not many of them had spent any time rolling about the gutters with drunks in Rose Street. They hadn’t been exposed to the violence, death and despair in the community. The police were always meant to reflect the community they serve. For a good 10-15 years back in the 80’s 90’s they were built to be ‘superior’ to the community and they lost all contact and all trust.

This had changed slightly when I joined in 2000. Accelerated promotion had opened to those who had passed all 3 parts of the Sgt's exam at the first sitting. I had 2 very good friends do that but chose not to go AP. They did their street time in West Lothian, which has never been an easy gig, and are now an outstanding DI and CI respectively.

 

I've never been an advocate of AP but some people are just better suited to leading and strategic thinking than others. That doesn't make them better, just a different skill set. I still firmly believe that you must have a decent length of time on the street AND have been in at least 1 other dept for a length of time.

 

My own tutor was 22 years in the same town, never got promoted, was in uniform his whole service but everyone knew him to be a master of his trade. I was very lucky having him as a tutor.

 

I was an instructor at the SPC for 3 years and all my classes had a mixture of degree holders (some multiple) and non-degree holders. That was no indication of how people performed in the academic side as to truly understand the legislation you have to be able to apply it as well.

 

There is still a fallacy put about by some 'old sweats' namely 'Give me a load of plumbers, joiners and squaddies. They make the best cops. Common sense and disciplined'. Crap. You need all types in society now for a balanced workforce. But I did get the odd 'But why?' from recruits. I'll disagree slightly with Sharpie there. I would explain the why but finish with 'The decision has been made to do XYZ. Can you get that done please?'.

 

Maybe like Sharpie, previous employment in a disciplined organisation like the prison service prepared me better for the police.

 

 

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Sharpie
Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, EH11_2NL said:

This had changed slightly when I joined in 2000. Accelerated promotion had opened to those who had passed all 3 parts of the Sgt's exam at the first sitting. I had 2 very good friends do that but chose not to go AP. They did their street time in West Lothian, which has never been an easy gig, and are now an outstanding DI and CI respectively.

 

I've never been an advocate of AP but some people are just better suited to leading and strategic thinking than others. That doesn't make them better, just a different skill set. I still firmly believe that you must have a decent length of time on the street AND have been in at least 1 other dept for a length of time.

 

My own tutor was 22 years in the same town, never got promoted, was in uniform his whole service but everyone knew him to be a master of his trade. I was very lucky having him as a tutor.

 

I was an instructor at the SPC for 3 years and all my classes had a mixture of degree holders (some multiple) and non-degree holders. That was no indication of how people performed in the academic side as to truly understand the legislation you have to be able to apply it as well.

 

There is still a fallacy put about by some 'old sweats' namely 'Give me a load of plumbers, joiners and squaddies. They make the best cops. Common sense and disciplined'. Crap. You need all types in society now for a balanced workforce. But I did get the odd 'But why?' from recruits. I'll disagree slightly with Sharpie there. I would explain the why but finish with 'The decision has been made to do XYZ. Can you get that done please?'.

 

Maybe like Sharpie, previous employment in a disciplined organisation like the prison service prepared me better for the police.

 

 

 

Yes one would expect quite a few differences, actually probably more when you have a forty five year gap before starting respective careers. My sergeants for example were mainly war veterans, and a sprinkling of wartime policemen. One who carried a three inch or so taped piece of bamboo for his disciplinary inflicting hand to bad guys. The nightly divisional car trip to breweries. The newer breed were some of the men who had taken education prior to war service, guys like Alistair Hood  not a veteran but a smart man whom I knew well who were well educated and well spoken, they were some of the examples of the new breed coming in, I had departed so never saw how the changes went. One thing I recall was Hood going to the F.B.I Academy course, I thought that must be the epitomy of success. I was very thrilled to have the same opportunity myself in 1980.

Edited by Sharpie
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Sharpie
Posted (edited)

I have just read my posts and think of others I have written on other subjects and it has opened another view on my history and knowledge.

I go back to being a young beat man on for example the Parkside Street box. One of the habits of beat men there was to stroll down Bernard Terrace and stand at the intersection lights at South Clerk Street.  This would quite often lead to you being kidnapped by some really old retired policeman who assailed you with his stories and history, causing a desire to escape by jumping under the first bus. That would have been a tragedy but a bigger tragedy is reading your own writings and realising you have become that old retired polis, preaching about how it  was then.  I apologise, but cannot promise to correct myself and my musings, its who I am, I appreciate that many on here have been much kinder and patient than I was and I am grateful for that, if it helps I do have some shame, and I will try harder to avoid providing reasons for readers to consider self destruction.

Edited by Sharpie
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JimmyCant
3 hours ago, Sharpie said:

 

Yes one would expect quite a few differences, actually probably more when you have a forty five year gap before starting respective careers. My sergeants for example were mainly war veterans, and a sprinkling of wartime policemen. One who carried a three inch or so taped piece of bamboo for his disciplinary inflicting hand to bad guys. The nightly divisional car trip to breweries. The newer breed were some of the men who had taken education prior to war service, guys like Alistair Hood  not a veteran but a smart man whom I knew well who were well educated and well spoken, they were some of the examples of the new breed coming in, I had departed so never saw how the changes went. One thing I recall was Hood going to the F.B.I Academy course, I thought that must be the epitomy of success. I was very thrilled to have the same opportunity myself in 1980.

I really liked Alistair Hood. He never liked me much until we discovered a common love of football. Years after he retired I was on tunnel duty at Easter Road and he was the Rangers security chief. Paul Gascoigne and him were in the tunnel and Gascoigne started using the emergency police phone which I had to take off him Alistair walks over to me ‘ Dont take any nonsense from that little shit, he shouldn’t even be at this club’ Near the end of the game I had to ask Mr Hood somewhat forcefully to leave the tunnel area. He laughed and said ‘Bet you’ve been waiting years to give me an order’ Nice man. Very tough. Strict disciplinarian. Great boss.

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redjambo
2 hours ago, Sharpie said:

That would have been a tragedy but a bigger tragedy is reading your own writings and realising you have become that old retired polis, preaching about how it  was then.  I apologise, but cannot promise to correct myself and my musings, its who I am, I appreciate that many on here have been much kinder and patient than I was and I am grateful for that, if it helps I do have some shame, and I will try harder to avoid providing reasons for readers to consider self destruction.

 

:D You keep those musings coming, Bob. I for one enjoy them greatly.

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otterjohn

Another example today of how Police should be much more respected and appreciated.

The carry ons in Manchester were a disgrace Why should the police be subject to that uncalled for level of violence more and more.

I'd like to see the police given more powers to quell the unrest quicker

Far to many goody goody's nows and we are now seeing why the soft touch isn't working

God knows why people would be attracted to working in the police force now

 

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Dalian Atkinson trial is harrowing.

Plenty of eyewitnesses all saying the same thing and the medical evidence of bootlace imprints on his forehead is fairly grim too.

Police should not be kicking people in the head and stamping on them.

Ever.

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Sharpie
2 hours ago, Cade said:

Dalian Atkinson trial is harrowing.

Plenty of eyewitnesses all saying the same thing and the medical evidence of bootlace imprints on his forehead is fairly grim too.

Police should not be kicking people in the head and stamping on them.

Ever.

 

Totally agree. 

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ri Alban
Posted (edited)

Police should look very intimidating. They've a job to do and these wee dwarfs couldn't keep hens oot a midden. 

 

Bring back the height restriction. 

 

 

Oh and get the lads from the military, once they leave, straight in a job. 

Edited by ri Alban
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Peakybunnet
1 hour ago, ri Alban said:

Police should look very intimidating. They've a job to do and these wee dwarfs couldn't keep hens oot a midden. 

 

Bring back the height restriction. 

 

 

Oh and get the lads from the military, once they leave, straight in a job. 

 

Straight out of life on Mars. 

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