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Any interesting ancestors?


BarneyBattles

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redjambo
8 minutes ago, muldoon74 said:

My brother is a building contractor based in Yorkshire...

 

He's a regular for a person who is a professional genealogist... So they've done some work for free..

 

On my Fathers side there is a record between a William Leslie and Isabell Ramsey 1792 and 1976 in Tranent. 

 

3rd line down of lineage there is a Definite Leslie reference in marriage to [my family name].. 

 

Makes sense as on my fathers side there are records going back to [at least] the early 1700's... all living on Liberton, ..

 

My Great Grandfather was a foreman at Blackford Quarry.. Seems for several generations my (Dads side) family were Quarrymen... Records show Quarryman, labourer etc..

 

My Dad grew up in Liberton (Cumnor Crescent and Peveril Terrace[The Inch])... 

 

I don't know the specifics but somehow my Grandfather (dads side) married my Grandmother who is from Shotts. (Coal miners all the way...).

 

All I know of my Paternal Grandmothers side is that she (Grandma) was a psychiatric nurse at Hartwood Asylum in, probably the 30's. (She was born 1911..)

 

Having travelled the trainline from Livi to Glasgow a few times past Hartwood, Shotts etc.. I always get a bit emotional.. I just want to know some stories..

 

 

There are some connections between Shotts and Midlothian regarding iron mining which may be of interest:

 

https://nationalminingmuseum.com/collection/projects/mauricewood-pit/

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muldoon74
Just now, redjambo said:

 

There are some connections between Shotts and Midlothian regarding iron mining which may be of interest:

 

https://nationalminingmuseum.com/collection/projects/mauricewood-pit/

Nice one.. I'll look at that.. 

 

Might go someway to explain how my grandfather met my grandmother..

 

For me, what makes it weirder is that my Mum has always said she feels that my dads mum never thought she (my mum) was good enough for him.. It was always put across in a snobby way..

 

maybe being from mining stock and raising herself up, as it were, to be a nurse there were issues there.. I will never know as they are all dead. 

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redjambo
1 minute ago, muldoon74 said:

Nice one.. I'll look at that.. 

 

Might go someway to explain how my grandfather met my grandmother..

 

For me, what makes it weirder is that my Mum has always said she feels that my dads mum never thought she (my mum) was good enough for him.. It was always put across in a snobby way..

 

maybe being from mining stock and raising herself up, as it were, to be a nurse there were issues there.. I will never know as they are all dead. 

 

It's perhaps not too unusual that a person's parents thinks that their child's partner isn't good enough for them, but I'm sorry your mum felt like that. Hopefully she just brushed it off.

 

You will probably be able to obtain birth (>100 years ago), marriage (>75), and death certificates (>50) for your ancestors on ScotlandsPeople online if you are interested (and view more recent years once the search rooms open up again). If you need any help with that, drop me a PM.

 

 

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The Frenchman Returns
3 minutes ago, redjambo said:

 

It's perhaps not too unusual that a person's parents thinks that their child's partner isn't good enough for them, but I'm sorry your mum felt like that. Hopefully she just brushed it off.

 

You will probably be able to obtain birth (>100 years ago), marriage (>75), and death certificates (>50) for your ancestors on ScotlandsPeople online if you are interested (and view more recent years once the search rooms open up again). If you need any help with that, drop me a PM.

 

 

red, any word on when the search rooms might open up again? Noticed the museum, Castle etc are opening next month.

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muldoon74
1 minute ago, redjambo said:

 

It's perhaps not too unusual that a person's parents thinks that their child's partner isn't good enough for them, but I'm sorry your mum felt like that. Hopefully she just brushed it off.

 

You will probably be able to obtain birth (>100 years ago), marriage (>75), and death certificates (>50) for your ancestors on ScotlandsPeople online if you are interested (and view more recent years once the search rooms open up again). If you need any help with that, drop me a PM.

 

 

Perhaps (from family gossip) but more maybe told.. My mum was raised in Colinton Mains Drive, right opposite Redford barracks.. I remember being woken up when visiting by the bands practising for the tattoo.. My dad was in the army and we travelled a lot.. It was awesome. 

 

One of my Grannys (just the one granny) claims to fame was that Wullie Bauld carried her washing for her down the street to the drying green as he lived in Oxgangs at the time.. 

 

Incidentally she also hung about the Playhouse entrance and snogged Perry Como.. 

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redjambo
13 minutes ago, The Frenchman Returns said:

red, any word on when the search rooms might open up again? Noticed the museum, Castle etc are opening next month.

 

The NRS say that public access probably won't be until phase 4 of the SG route map. Frankly I haven't a Scooby when that will be, sorry.

 

https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/about-us/service-status

 

Oops, I should have read the whole thing. The above related to full reopening. Further down, they say that they're hoping to allow limited access to the historical search room in April.

Edited by redjambo
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Footballfirst

One researcher into one of my ancestral lines (Crawford) claimed to have traced the line back to William Wallace (according to the traditional Elderslie sources, his mum was Margaret Crawford).  I worked out that he would be the son of one of my 22 x G Grandparents, all 16,777,216 of them, a total that is probably more than everyone who has ever lived in Scotland throughout history.

 

The research had a few flaws in it requiring child brides and births, as well as questionable links around 250 years ago that I don't buy into.

 

However I'm sure we are all related if you go back far enough. We are all Jock Tamson's bairns after all.

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Stuart Lyon
16 hours ago, Baldwigforjack said:

According to my DNA results and Ancestry's DNA Stories I'm related to Richard Jordan Gatling, inventor of the Gatling Gun.

I suppose that makes you a big shot!

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Baldwigforjack
42 minutes ago, Stuart Lyon said:

I suppose that makes you a big shot!

Indeed lol

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Baldwigforjack
1 hour ago, Footballfirst said:

One researcher into one of my ancestral lines (Crawford) claimed to have traced the line back to William Wallace (according to the traditional Elderslie sources, his mum was Margaret Crawford).  I worked out that he would be the son of one of my 22 x G Grandparents, all 16,777,216 of them, a total that is probably more than everyone who has ever lived in Scotland throughout history.

 

The research had a few flaws in it requiring child brides and births, as well as questionable links around 250 years ago that I don't buy into.

 

However I'm sure we are all related if you go back far enough. We are all Jock Tamson's bairns after all.

First things first, child brides and births back then were not uncommon.

Secondly, yes, we are all related somehow and you're correct, go back far enough and you'd have more ancestors than people who were actually alive on the planet. Two parents, four grandparents etc.

You probably are related to him in someway, unlikely to be through your Crawford line though.

Edited by Baldwigforjack
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BarneyBattles

I remember reading a few years back that 1 in 200 men in the world today are descended from Genghis Khan, including 10% of Mongolia! Some boy old Genghis. 

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Baldwigforjack
26 minutes ago, BarneyBattles said:

I remember reading a few years back that 1 in 200 men in the world today are descended from Genghis Khan, including 10% of Mongolia! Some boy old Genghis. 

Thats nothing. All living Europeans are descended from Charlemagne. 

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Jambo-Jimbo
26 minutes ago, Baldwigforjack said:

First things first, child brides and births back then were not uncommon.

Secondly, yes, we are all related somehow and you're correct, go back far enough and you'd have more ancestors than people who were actually alive on the planet. Two parents, four grandparents etc.

You probably are related to him in someway, unlikely to be through your Crawford line though.

 

Until 1929 the legal age of marriage in Scotland was 12 for a girl & 14 for a boy.

https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/registration/getting-married-in-scotland/minimum-age-for-marriage-in-scotland

The article notes that in practice it was almost unknown for children to marry at such young ages.

 

However, the key word is 'almost', which means, at least to me as being it might have happended on a few occasions.

 

 

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redjambo
11 hours ago, muldoon74 said:

Perhaps (from family gossip) but more maybe told.. My mum was raised in Colinton Mains Drive, right opposite Redford barracks.. I remember being woken up when visiting by the bands practising for the tattoo.. My dad was in the army and we travelled a lot.. It was awesome. 

 

One of my Grannys (just the one granny) claims to fame was that Wullie Bauld carried her washing for her down the street to the drying green as he lived in Oxgangs at the time.. 

 

Incidentally she also hung about the Playhouse entrance and snogged Perry Como.. 

 

Your gran sounds like a colourful woman, muldoon!

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muldoon74
1 minute ago, redjambo said:

 

Your gran sounds like a colourful woman, muldoon!

Should've added "once" onto that.. 😂

 

However she was indeed a character. 

 

She was shop steward at the City Hospital laundry for over 20 years, even at 4ft 11" she could rip you verbally, without losing her cool.. 

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Baldwigforjack
4 hours ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Until 1929 the legal age of marriage in Scotland was 12 for a girl & 14 for a boy.

https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/registration/getting-married-in-scotland/minimum-age-for-marriage-in-scotland

The article notes that in practice it was almost unknown for children to marry at such young ages.

 

However, the key word is 'almost', which means, at least to me as being it might have happended on a few occasions.

 

 

The post I was replying to wasn't mentioning child marriages in 1929, long before then it was very common.

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redjambo
3 minutes ago, Baldwigforjack said:

The post I was replying to wasn't mentioning child marriages in 1929, long before then it was very common.

 

I have to say that I've done a lot of research on my ancestors and I've only ever seen one that was married below the age of 16, and that was a 15-year old female. I've also read elsewhere that although 12 and 14 were the legal marriage ages, in practice that seldom happened.

 

The NRS' take on things:

 

https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/registration/getting-married-in-scotland/minimum-age-for-marriage-in-scotland

 

Before 1929, Scots law followed Roman law in allowing a girl to marry at twelve years of age and a boy at fourteen, without any requirement for parental consent. However, according to one early 20th-century source*, marriage in Scotland at such young ages was in practice almost unknown. No doubt if marriages between children had become common, there would have been public pressure to raise the legal minimum age of marriage earlier than 1929. The Age of Marriage Act 1929 (applying in Scotland, England & Wales but not in Northern Ireland) made void any marriage between persons either of whom was under the age of sixteen. Sixteen remains the lower age-limit today, contained in the current legislation, the Marriage (Scotland) Act 1977. Scots law still has no requirement for parental consent.

 

*Source: Vital registration: a manual of the law and practice concerning the registration of births, deaths and marriages. (G T Bisset-Smith. 1st edition. Edinburgh: William Green & Sons, 1902)

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Baldwigforjack
2 minutes ago, redjambo said:

 

I have to say that I've done a lot of research on my ancestors and I've only ever seen one that was married below the age of 16, and that was a 15-year old female. I've also read elsewhere that although 12 and 14 were the legal marriage ages, in practice that seldom happened.

 

The NRS' take on things:

 

https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/registration/getting-married-in-scotland/minimum-age-for-marriage-in-scotland

 

Before 1929, Scots law followed Roman law in allowing a girl to marry at twelve years of age and a boy at fourteen, without any requirement for parental consent. However, according to one early 20th-century source*, marriage in Scotland at such young ages was in practice almost unknown. No doubt if marriages between children had become common, there would have been public pressure to raise the legal minimum age of marriage earlier than 1929. The Age of Marriage Act 1929 (applying in Scotland, England & Wales but not in Northern Ireland) made void any marriage between persons either of whom was under the age of sixteen. Sixteen remains the lower age-limit today, contained in the current legislation, the Marriage (Scotland) Act 1977. Scots law still has no requirement for parental consent.

 

*Source: Vital registration: a manual of the law and practice concerning the registration of births, deaths and marriages. (G T Bisset-Smith. 1st edition. Edinburgh: William Green & Sons, 1902)

I'm talking about a time before registration was law. You researched your history back to the 15th century?

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redjambo
1 minute ago, Baldwigforjack said:

I'm talking about a time before registration was law. You researched your history back to the 15th century?

 

Registration only became obligatory in 1855 and didn't change the age requirements for marriage. No, I haven't traced my ancestors back as far as the 15th century because my ancestors were pretty much non-landed working class and so weren't in the earlier records. You're very fortunate to be have been able to do that. :thumb:

 

Here's another link: http://historicalhussies.blogspot.com/2016/05/marriage-in-medieval-scotland.html

 

"Women could marry from the age of 12 (for boys it was from 14) and, while many girls from the upper ranks of society married in their teens, by the end of the medieval period most in the Lowlands married in their twenties. This allowed them to acquire the resources needed to form a household."

 

Which leads to the interesting question as to what the situation was in the Highlands. :)

 

So, on to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_in_early_modern_Scotland:

 

"In the Highland and Islands marriage ages may have been lower and more closely resembled Gaelic Ireland"

 

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Jambo-Jimbo
56 minutes ago, Baldwigforjack said:

The post I was replying to wasn't mentioning child marriages in 1929, long before then it was very common.

 

And neither was my reply mentioning child marriages in 1929 either.

 

The law was changed in 1929, a law which had been in operation for centuries prior to 1929.

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Jambo-Jimbo
34 minutes ago, redjambo said:

 

Registration only became obligatory in 1855 and didn't change the age requirements for marriage. No, I haven't traced my ancestors back as far as the 15th century because my ancestors were pretty much non-landed working class and so weren't in the earlier records. You're very fortunate to be have been able to do that. :thumb:

 

 

 

As you'll know going back before 1553 is almost if not near impossible for the normal working class family, they simply weren't recorded in the records, unless under very limited circumstances, which are few and far between.

 

I have one family I can trace back to the 1520's and that's only because they were Burgesses in Dunfermline and were Merchants so they appear in Burgh records etc, but apart from them everyone else is anything from the 1600's to 1700's.

 

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Lone Striker

Not a blood ancestor, but through marriage.    The gentleman in the smart plus-fours on the left (next to the giant defender) in this photo of the Wembley Wizards was married to my Grandmother's sister,. His name was Jimmy Kerr - the early equivalent of today's manager, but in reality he was the "trainer".  Teams were picked by committees.  Uncle Jimmy also had spells as "trainer" at Rangers and Hearts.    After he retired, he set up a room in his house for private chiropractor/physio  consultations.   I think he died in the early 70s

 

article-2391196-01CB76F80000044D-860_634x402.jpg

 

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maroonlegions

Watching "My Years With The Queen , Lord Mountbatten , my grandfather was one of his personnel driver, chauffeur , when he was chief of police in India.. 

 

 

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maroonlegions
Just now, maroonlegions said:

Watching "My Years With The Queen , Lord Mountbatten , my grandfather was one of his personnel driver, chauffeur , when he was chief of police in India.. He was awarded a medal from Lord Mountbatten, its still with our family.

 

 

 

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