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BarneyBattles

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Auld Reekin'
21 minutes ago, The Frenchman Returns said:

I also used Ancestry DNA and can back up what @Jambo-Jimbo stated, it was accurate.

 

You can be contacted by others with a similar DNA, one came up as my 2nd – 3rd Cousin with 2% shared DNA, but he had the same name as my granny's maiden name and he was struggling with that part of his tree as it was confusing him. I was able to explain that two brothers married two sisters (not in a Hibs sort of way), one brother and sister being my mums parents.

 

Merci!   :icon14:

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Maple Leaf
On 24/02/2021 at 14:02, RS86 said:

My family descend from Walter Stewart and his wife Marjorie. Her father was a fairly well known chap, Robert the Bruce

 

The current queen is also descended from Marjorie, so you are definitely in line for the throne when she dies ... maybe around 1,000th, but still a good conversation piece at your next party! :thumb:

 

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7 minutes ago, Maple Leaf said:

 

The current queen is also descended from Marjorie, so you are definitely in line for the throne when she dies ... maybe around 1,000th, but still a good conversation piece at your next party! :thumb:

 

I didn't actually know that. Ironically my Dad lives in Windsor these days (well technically just outside)!

 

My oldest girl was doing Scottish history at school and they covered Robert the Bruce as a topic so she was mentioning it to everyone then. Makes no odds to me as i'm none the richer for knowing though :lol:

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Maple Leaf

All my life I was told that my maternal grandmother married an Italian, Antonio Macari, therefore I was 25% Italian.  Poor Antonio died young, before I was born, and my grandmother got remarried to a close Scottish friend named John Murray.  

 

About 3 years ago I had my DNA analysed and, surprise surprise, my DNA is 86% Scottish and 14% Irish.  Not a trace of any Italian.  Methinks that John Murray was more than just a close friend to my grandmother.  John Murray was a staunch Hearts supporter, so there's no bad news here!

 

The last of the players in this mini drama died decades ago, so my grandmother's secret is safe.

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I think most people on here will have at least one shotgun wedding in their not so distant past. I remember my mum telling me about the various older members of my family that had rushed marriages, including some proper judgemental old arses about young people.  
One silly old sod stood up at her parents 50th anniversary party and gave a wee speech that finished with her saying “time flies right enough, I’ll be 50 myself in 6 months” cue everyone there sniggering under their breath and the parent giving her the evils. I don’t think it have even dawned on her before. 

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NANOJAMBO

My m-in-law (see the family feuds thread 😄 ) is illegitimate and it is a VERY touchy subject when we talk about the family tree. There's at least one other  illegitimate birth in the family who was given up for adoption  , we know where that person lives and the sex but that's all.

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Lemongrab
1 hour ago, Tazio said:

I think most people on here will have at least one shotgun wedding in their not so distant past. I remember my mum telling me about the various older members of my family that had rushed marriages, including some proper judgemental old arses about young people.  
One silly old sod stood up at her parents 50th anniversary party and gave a wee speech that finished with her saying “time flies right enough, I’ll be 50 myself in 6 months” cue everyone there sniggering under their breath and the parent giving her the evils. I don’t think it have even dawned on her before. 

When I first started looking into my family tree, I discovered my mum who was born in 1937, was 2 years old when her parents were married. She'd never mentioned this and was quite embarrassed when I asked her about it. I suppose that might have been a big deal at one time. Apparently mum's granny and grandad didn't approve of the guy and wouldn't let them marry. They ran off to Gretna Green,  I think when the next sprog was on the way.

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Awbdy Oot

Astronaut John Glenn's grandfather was the cousin of my great grandfather. Something like that anyway. Another poster (communist that sounds like Doris) has a similar link to him.

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inspector

According to my Dad, my Great great grandfather was Provost of Portsoy (might have missed out a great or two)

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Twenty fifth president of the US William McKinley is an ancestor on my mothers side of the family. I had been told about this when growing up but always had my doubts. Then along came the internet and I saw a pic of him. He was a ringer for one of my mothers brothers.

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John Gentleman
On 25/02/2021 at 21:09, redjambo said:

 

Indeed. I've also lost count of the number of my ancestors who died after the 1851 census but before statutory registration in 1855. "If only they had just lasted another couple of years or so, I could have got so much more info!" is a cry I have oft uttered.

 

 

I've got one of these too - a great-great grandmother who appears on the 1851 census (though weirdly had reverted from her married name (Gentleman, on the 1841 census) to her maiden name, Dunsmore). In the 1861 (and subsequent censuses) she simply had disappeared from the radar, without a corresponding death record. As you say, bloody frustrating. Also, It didn't help that her actual birth surname was Dunmuir.

A few 'helpful' folk have suggested she may have gone to England or N. Ireland, though I think that would be a long shot. The vast, vast majority of people born in the early/mid 19th century lived and died within a few miles of their birthplace. And not many lived long lives either - rampant TB saw to that.

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Jambo-Jimbo
1 hour ago, JFK-1 said:

Twenty fifth president of the US William McKinley is an ancestor on my mothers side of the family. I had been told about this when growing up but always had my doubts. Then along came the internet and I saw a pic of him. He was a ringer for one of my mothers brothers.

 

It's funny how genetics often work.

 

Mrs JJ has an aunt who is the spitting image of one of her aunt's Grandmother's sisters, that's 2 generations apart and these 2 women are almost identical, but one born in the 1880's & the other in the 1940's.

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45 minutes ago, John Gentleman said:

I've got one of these too - a great-great grandmother who appears on the 1851 census (though weirdly had reverted from her married name (Gentleman, on the 1841 census) to her maiden name, Dunsmore). In the 1861 (and subsequent censuses) she simply had disappeared from the radar, without a corresponding death record. As you say, bloody frustrating. Also, It didn't help that her actual birth surname was Dunmuir.

A few 'helpful' folk have suggested she may have gone to England or N. Ireland, though I think that would be a long shot. The vast, vast majority of people born in the early/mid 19th century lived and died within a few miles of their birthplace. And not many lived long lives either - rampant TB saw to that.

 

JG, please feel free to PM me more details on that particular ancestor. I've done quite a lot of family history sleuthing, so may be able to shed some light on what became of her.

 

Regarding those who suggested the move to England or Ireland, it may well not be the case here, but in my experience emigrations to Canada, the US, Australia etc. can often be the reason for a sudden departure from the records. However, in a large number of these cases, descendants of those who emigrated have subsequently traced their ancestors back to Scotland and the reason for their departure is therefore known.

 

On the subject of Dunsmore, Dunmuir, that type of variation in names in the records was very common indeed. It's why I now usually use wildcards in my searches if I can, and even then that doesn't pick up everything.

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John Findlay

My dad was one of 14 children, seven females and seven males. Very staunch protestant family from Clydebank. My mum was one of seven children all females from Leith. Catholic family.

My mum and dad got married 10th of December 1960 at Leith registry office. 

Reason being my dad's dad refused to enter the chapel and in retaliation my mum's dad refused to enter the kirk.

This led to my dad having a big fallout with his dad and my dad calling him an old bigot.

My dad's dad died in 1962 the year before I was born. His dad would have really hit the roof as my dad allowed my mum to have me and my three younger sisters baptised in the catholic church.

My dad despised sectarianism and bigotry with a passion.

Made me very proud of him.

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Maple Leaf
7 minutes ago, John Findlay said:

My dad was one of 14 children, seven females and seven males. Very staunch protestant family from Clydebank. My mum was one of seven children all females from Leith. Catholic family.

My mum and dad got married 10th of December 1960 at Leith registry office. 

Reason being my dad's dad refused to enter the chapel and in retaliation my mum's dad refused to enter the kirk.

This led to my dad having a big fallout with his dad and my dad calling him an old bigot.

My dad's dad died in 1962 the year before I was born. His dad would have really hit the roof as my dad allowed my mum to have me and my three younger sisters baptised in the catholic church.

My dad despised sectarianism and bigotry with a passion.

Made me very proud of him.

 

My dad was raised a Protestant and my mum was raised a Catholic.  When they got married there were a lot of hard feelings among siblings on both sides, and the animosity lasted for years.  

 

But that was in the 1930s, so I hope attitudes have become more enlightened since then.

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Lemongrab
6 hours ago, redjambo said:

 

JG, please feel free to PM me more details on that particular ancestor. I've done quite a lot of family history sleuthing, so may be able to shed some light on what became of her.

 

Regarding those who suggested the move to England or Ireland, it may well not be the case here, but in my experience emigrations to Canada, the US, Australia etc. can often be the reason for a sudden departure from the records. However, in a large number of these cases, descendants of those who emigrated have subsequently traced their ancestors back to Scotland and the reason for their departure is therefore known.

 

On the subject of Dunsmore, Dunmuir, that type of variation in names in the records was very common indeed. It's why I now usually use wildcards in my searches if I can, and even then that doesn't pick up everything.

 

You don't have to go all that far back for errors. Once of my sisters, born in 1966, has our surname spelled incorrectly on the Scotland's People site. Looking back, so far I've found three different spellings; with some people, different versions have been used on their birth and death certificates.

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Jambo-Jimbo
28 minutes ago, Maple Leaf said:

 

My dad was raised a Protestant and my mum was raised a Catholic.  When they got married there were a lot of hard feelings among siblings on both sides, and the animosity lasted for years.  

 

But that was in the 1930s, so I hope attitudes have become more enlightened since then.

 

Mrs JJ's aunt (the one I mentioned earlier) married a catholic, this didn't go down well with her parents, them being staunch protestants wouldn't let the poor chap into their house, they even refused to attend the wedding, they did get all dressed up and had photos taken with their daughter, but no groom in their house, this was in the mid '60's, it was about 2 years after they had been married before he was allowed into their house, which is pathetic.  At least her siblings all attended their sisters wedding.

 

I never paid any attention to it at the time, but I remember the first time I met Mrs JJ's grandfather on a visit to Coatbridge, I remember him saying to me that, I hear your a Hearts man, that's alright then.  It wasn't until much later that the penny dropped, of what he was thinking/meaning.

 

Even today in places through the West of Scotland, it still matters, to some.

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Maple Leaf
3 hours ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Mrs JJ's aunt (the one I mentioned earlier) married a catholic, this didn't go down well with her parents, them being staunch protestants wouldn't let the poor chap into their house, they even refused to attend the wedding, they did get all dressed up and had photos taken with their daughter, but no groom in their house, this was in the mid '60's, it was about 2 years after they had been married before he was allowed into their house, which is pathetic.  At least her siblings all attended their sisters wedding.

 

I never paid any attention to it at the time, but I remember the first time I met Mrs JJ's grandfather on a visit to Coatbridge, I remember him saying to me that, I hear your a Hearts man, that's alright then.  It wasn't until much later that the penny dropped, of what he was thinking/meaning.

 

Even today in places through the West of Scotland, it still matters, to some.

 

I'm pleased to say that my experience in Canada is that no-one gives a **** about what sect of the Christian church a person belongs to.  That's probably not true for everyone in every part of the country, but it is my experience.

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FinnBarr Saunders
On 25/02/2021 at 02:46, Ulysses said:

 

Nobody famous in my line, for a few generations at any rate.

 

As a young single man my grandfather (Belfast Protestant) got a 16 year old girl pregnant.  Her father (Belfast Catholic) was away on a British Merchant Navy vessel at the time the news broke.  Her mother decided this was too shameful (It was the 1930s) and packed her off to one of Ireland's infamous Mother and Baby homes (see Philomena, the movie) so she could have her baby there and have it sent off for adoption.

 

Her da returned from sea shortly afterwards and was told the story.  He found the only person he knew with a car (local doctor) and they drove to this Mother and Baby home (a couple of hours' drive away), rang on the doorbell and asked for his daughter back.  He brought her back home.  Subsequently, at the invitation of the nuns, she returned to the home, had her baby and was looked after for a couple of weeks before both mother and child returned home.

 

Her father also tracked down my grandfather's whereabouts and reported him to the cops.  My grandfather was charged with some sex-related offence, copped a plea for something more minor, and was sentenced to some time in prison.  After a few months in the slammer, sometime in 1940, he was released on condition he leave the jurisdiction, him being a resident of NI and a British citizen/subject. 

 

My grandfather left, took himself across the Border and thence to England, where he enlisted (he had an exemption from conscription).  Because of Dunkirk and all that, he found himself training and (more or less) kicking his heels.  Late in 1941, he got some leave, which he used to return to Ireland, where he got word to my grandmother (now 18 and with a 2 year old) that he was in town. On a Saturday afternoon, in a local tea shop/café, they talked and decided they would get married.

 

But they figured that unless they made this a fait accompli they would be stopped, most likely by her family but possibly by his.  So they legged it to the local Catholic church, knocked on the presbytery door and explained the position to the parish priest.  He, apparently, thought this was a hoot, and more or less told them to feck off.  At the time, there was a rule in force in the Catholic church that didn't allow mixed-faith marriages at all, which meant that if she wanted to get married in the church he would have to change religion.  When the priest told them to go away, they pointed out that  their only choice would be to run round to the local Church of Ireland and ask for their assistance. 

 

So the priest relented and asked them to wait while he made some calls to Armagh and Dublin (which was quite a big deal in 1941).  The relevant permissions were obtained, and they duly returned to the church where, in the space of an hour or thereabouts my grandfather was christened and confirmed into the Catholic church following which he and my grandmother were married.  When being baptised my grandfather needed two godparents.   Because the only woman in the church at the time was my grandmother, there was no-one permitted to be godmother to him, so his Catholic baptismal record contains the names of two godfathers, which is a bit unusual.

 

The wedding completed, they presented themselves and their fait accompli to her parents.  In telling this story, my grandmother didn't give precise details of what her father said, though she did say that they all had something to eat, following which her father, her new husband and several other male relatives got together and ****ed off to the pub.  A day or two later, my grandfather returned to England and the Army.  Over the next couple of years there was some to-ing and fro-ing between England and Ireland, during which time my mother was born.

 

Except for some service in the south and east of England, my grandfather's war didn't really get going until D-Day.  However, it came to a sudden, painful and somewhat embarrassing halt a couple of days later somewhere in Normandy when he was shot.  In a ditch.  In the backside.  While pulling up his trousers having just taken a dump.  He was shipped back to England where he needed some surgery and recovery, so by the time he was ready to be deployed again it was the end of April 1945, and although he saw service he wasn't involved in any further action.

 

In the meantime, by the way, his family in Belfast had cut off contact with him as soon as they heard of his wedding (and more significantly, his conversion to Catholicism).  However, the cutting off of contact was at the direction of his father, and when his father died in an accident in the early 1950s his mother re-established contact.  This led to the situation where, for a number of years in the 1950s, my mother would visit her Protestant relatives in Belfast for a couple of weeks in June, return to the Republic for a couple of weeks either side of mid-July, and travel back to Belfast to spend a couple of weeks with the relations on the other side.  But as far as she knew the two groups of relations never met each other.

 

Anyway, there's more to the story, but it's mostly of interest to me only (or maybe my relatives).  I swore I'd never write this down as long as my mother and grandmother were alive.  But my mother passed away just before Christmas 2019, and my grandmother slipped away last summer (though her mind had gone a long while before that).  So now I've written it down - a wee tribute to two courageous and strong-willed women who influenced my life, and two courageous and strong-willed men who influenced theirs.

 

I've got a wee pal from Cork who ended up in a "Mother Baby" home because she was single and pregnant at 15. Don't know where but I'm guessing Cork direction. Mother/Baby home had an entrance door, stairs then an enclosed walk bridge over the road, her dad took her to the top of the stairs with her clothes in a bin bag and shouted "heres another whore" as he slung the bin bag towards a nun.He died before his grandaughter was born. I find this awfy heartbreaking.

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John Gentleman
8 hours ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Mrs JJ's aunt (the one I mentioned earlier) married a catholic, this didn't go down well with her parents, them being staunch protestants wouldn't let the poor chap into their house, they even refused to attend the wedding, they did get all dressed up and had photos taken with their daughter, but no groom in their house, this was in the mid '60's, it was about 2 years after they had been married before he was allowed into their house, which is pathetic.  At least her siblings all attended their sisters wedding.

 

I never paid any attention to it at the time, but I remember the first time I met Mrs JJ's grandfather on a visit to Coatbridge, I remember him saying to me that, I hear your a Hearts man, that's alright then.  It wasn't until much later that the penny dropped, of what he was thinking/meaning.

 

Even today in places through the West of Scotland, it still matters, to some.

It seems pathetic to us because we're looking at things through 2021 lenses, but back then the issues were very real.

My sister married an RC in 1970. The RC church made it plain that the marriage wouldn't be recognised unless it was conducted 'in front of their altar', so my sister had to convert to catholicism – which she did with some gusto, to my slight bewilderment. Not that it bothered me much - I was only 17 at the time - but it did deeply offend my parents who were practising, communicant kirk members. In their eyes, this was the catholic church telling them that the religion they practised was fallacious and to be disregarded. And they weren't having a bar of that.

Unlike your story, it was never about personalities. My bro-in-law, before and after marriage, was always welcome at our place and my mother made sure there was always a feed waiting for him. My parents' issue was always one of principle.

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21 hours ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

It's funny how genetics often work.

 

Mrs JJ has an aunt who is the spitting image of one of her aunt's Grandmother's sisters, that's 2 generations apart and these 2 women are almost identical, but one born in the 1880's & the other in the 1940's.

 

We have also been contacted by American descendants of McKinley who found us thorough internet research and eventually traded photos of various family members.

 

And again as you say there were striking resemblances between some despite each family having lived on different continents for at least a couple of centuries or so.

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Jambo-Jimbo
10 hours ago, Maple Leaf said:

 

I'm pleased to say that my experience in Canada is that no-one gives a **** about what sect of the Christian church a person belongs to.  That's probably not true for everyone in every part of the country, but it is my experience.

 

Same here in the Scottish Borders, nobody gives a feck about religion.

When I worked in a bar, we'd have both Celtic & Rangers fans sitting at the same tables watching an old firm game, the banter did sometimes get a bit lively but nothing really nasty or violent and never did it involve religion, the banter was about the football and nothing else.

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Jambo-Jimbo
4 hours ago, John Gentleman said:

It seems pathetic to us because we're looking at things through 2021 lenses, but back then the issues were very real.

My sister married an RC in 1970. The RC church made it plain that the marriage wouldn't be recognised unless it was conducted 'in front of their altar', so my sister had to convert to catholicism – which she did with some gusto, to my slight bewilderment. Not that it bothered me much - I was only 17 at the time - but it did deeply offend my parents who were practising, communicant kirk members. In their eyes, this was the catholic church telling them that the religion they practised was fallacious and to be disregarded. And they weren't having a bar of that.

Unlike your story, it was never about personalities. My bro-in-law, before and after marriage, was always welcome at our place and my mother made sure there was always a feed waiting for him. My parents' issue was always one of principle.

 

And the footnote is, that when they eventually got to know the chap, they ended up treating him like a son and religion was never an issue thereafter. 

 

Why religion was an issue I don't know, maybe perhaps and I don't know for sure, but the family were all Mason's, generations of them were. so maybe that had something to do with it, but I don't know.

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Queensland Jambo

My grandfather was Polish, escaped when the Nazi's invaded in 1939 through Romania and then on to France and subsequently England.  

 

Fast forward a few years and he was deployed in occupied Poland.  He was shot pretty badly at one point, and managed to be taken on a plane to Bari where he woke up in hospital the next day.

 

He asked a nurse what day it was to be told "30 August" which he confirmed was his birthday.  The nurse, an Irish volunteer from Cork, brought a jug of beer to him at the end of her shift.

 

They married 3 months later.  I've never met two more mentally strong people in my life.

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pharmaceutical01

My uncle - who I obviously never met - died on the very last day of World War 2 in a flying accident - typical of luck in our family 

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Nookie Bear
8 hours ago, Queensland Jambo said:

My grandfather was Polish, escaped when the Nazi's invaded in 1939 through Romania and then on to France and subsequently England.  

 

Fast forward a few years and he was deployed in occupied Poland.  He was shot pretty badly at one point, and managed to be taken on a plane to Bari where he woke up in hospital the next day.

 

He asked a nurse what day it was to be told "30 August" which he confirmed was his birthday.  The nurse, an Irish volunteer from Cork, brought a jug of beer to him at the end of her shift.

 

They married 3 months later.  I've never met two more mentally strong people in my life.

Love that story 👍🏻

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fancy a brew
On 25/02/2021 at 22:30, Maple Leaf said:

All my life I was told that my maternal grandmother married an Italian, Antonio Macari, therefore I was 25% Italian.  Poor Antonio died young, before I was born, and my grandmother got remarried to a close Scottish friend named John Murray.  

 

About 3 years ago I had my DNA analysed and, surprise surprise, my DNA is 86% Scottish and 14% Irish.  Not a trace of any Italian.  Methinks that John Murray was more than just a close friend to my grandmother.  John Murray was a staunch Hearts supporter, so there's no bad news here!

 

The last of the players in this mini drama died decades ago, so my grandmother's secret is safe.

 

tenor.gif

 

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Governor Tarkin
9 hours ago, Queensland Jambo said:

My grandfather was Polish, escaped when the Nazi's invaded in 1939 through Romania and then on to France and subsequently England.  

 

Fast forward a few years and he was deployed in occupied Poland.  He was shot pretty badly at one point, and managed to be taken on a plane to Bari where he woke up in hospital the next day.

 

He asked a nurse what day it was to be told "30 August" which he confirmed was his birthday.  The nurse, an Irish volunteer from Cork, brought a jug of beer to him at the end of her shift.

 

They married 3 months later.  I've never met two more mentally strong people in my life.

 

:love:

 

 

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JDK2020
On 24/02/2021 at 18:57, Baldwigforjack said:

My 6x greatgrandfather was murdered by his son[my 6x great uncle] with a fireplace poker.

 

Bludgeoned? Or inserted red hot? 🤔

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JDK2020
On 24/02/2021 at 19:02, RS86 said:

My family descend from Walter Stewart and his wife Marjorie. Her father was a fairly well known chap, Robert the Bruce

 

Aye, right. 😆

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JDK2020
On 24/02/2021 at 20:49, Tazio said:

One of my grandads was a massive arsehole, Olympian standard. 
He managed to have two families on the go, both in Leith and only about a mile or so apart. He seemed to manage this as he was a trawler man and would claim he was off to sea for a fortnight or whatever but actually only do half the time and then head off to the second family. Then repeat the entire thing with them. Common knowledge to a lot of people but neither of the families ever found out about the other. Then my dad’s mother died so being the nice guy he was he put his 4 sons into an orphanage and moved in full time with the other family until he got bored with them and vanished. In this same period he signed papers that sent the 2 youngest off to an Australian orphanage for a new life. My dad came back on leave from the army and discovered this had happened and he wasn’t allowed details of where they’re been sent. It took 25 years or so until they were reconnected by one of the Australians writing a letter to the Daily Record letters page appealing for relatives in Scotland.  The last time my old man saw him was when he turned up at his wedding and was told in pretty blunt terms by my dad to **** off or else. Then out of nowhere my dad got a phone call about 30 years later from a woman in Grimsby saying she was his daughter and he’d died and gave my dad the funeral details. To my amazement he actually went to it “just to make sure the old ******* was dead”.

I didn’t know about the 2nd family until I was in my twenties and went to visit my parents and met their new next door neighbour who I casually mentioned to my mum looked oddly like my dad. At which point she went into panic mode and dragged me out the room and explained the whole sorry tale. So my dad ended up living next door to his half brother for about 10 years with neither of them aware of their relationship. 
If you made shit like that into a film people would say it was ridiculously far fetched. So I’ve got relatives all over Leith and Grimsby I’ve no knowledge of. Also my dad’s older brother went off to join the army and hasn’t been seen since. 
Thank Christ my mum’s side were normal. Well, most of them but that’s another odd story of vanishing sailors. 

 

Wow, great story! 👍

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1 hour ago, JDK2020 said:

 

Aye, right. 😆

Walter Stewart (6th High Steward of Scotland) had a son Robert Stewart (King of Scotland II). His son was Robert Stewart (Prince of Scotland). His son was also called Robert (1st Lord of Lorne). He then had a son called John Mourach Stewart (Lord of Lorne). His son was named Dugald Stewart. He had a son called Allan Richard Appin Stewart, who's son was called Alexander Stewart. He had a son called Donald "nan Ord" Stewart (2nd Lord Invernahyle) who had a son called Alexander. His son was Donald Stewart (5th Earl of Invernahyle). His son was Duncan Stewart Rev. who had a son Alexander Stewart. His son was Allan Stewart, who had a son Robert Stewart. He had a son Alexander (another one!) who had a son Henderson "Henry" Stewart. His son was called William, who had a son called John Watson Stewart. He was father of William Stewart, who also named his son John Watson Stewart. His son was James Scott Stewart. And I'll let you work out who James's son was...

 

Feel free to fact check it and let me know of any discrepencies though 😉

 

Good thing with having some royal lineage is that it's well documented/researched so easier to follow. When we did my mrs family tree it was far harder because there was much less info further back we went.

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JDK2020
3 hours ago, RS86 said:

Walter Stewart (6th High Steward of Scotland) had a son Robert Stewart (King of Scotland II). His son was Robert Stewart (Prince of Scotland). His son was also called Robert (1st Lord of Lorne). He then had a son called John Mourach Stewart (Lord of Lorne). His son was named Dugald Stewart. He had a son called Allan Richard Appin Stewart, who's son was called Alexander Stewart. He had a son called Donald "nan Ord" Stewart (2nd Lord Invernahyle) who had a son called Alexander. His son was Donald Stewart (5th Earl of Invernahyle). His son was Duncan Stewart Rev. who had a son Alexander Stewart. His son was Allan Stewart, who had a son Robert Stewart. He had a son Alexander (another one!) who had a son Henderson "Henry" Stewart. His son was called William, who had a son called John Watson Stewart. He was father of William Stewart, who also named his son John Watson Stewart. His son was James Scott Stewart. And I'll let you work out who James's son was...

 

Feel free to fact check it and let me know of any discrepencies though 😉

 

Good thing with having some royal lineage is that it's well documented/researched so easier to follow. When we did my mrs family tree it was far harder because there was much less info further back we went.

 

Nah, your a'right...

 

                       ...your grace!  😆

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32 minutes ago, JDK2020 said:

 

Nah, your a'right...

 

                       ...your grace!  😆

 

🤣🤣

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haveyouheard1874

Reckon my Uncle Bob was the Man who infiltrated Rommel's camp 

 

He was of Arab origin and multi lingual

 

Wrote couple of fictional books while night editor of the Mail

 

He left the army a Colonel, and highly decorated

 

One reason i was told it was kept hush hush Re who was involved, was allegedly  they  killed a top German Officer or more who were  onto them and it was  kept Top Secret, even to this day  ...think it will take 25yr or more to find out what really or may have happened  when the files are opened 

 

 

Just saying

Edited by haveyouheard1874
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I P Knightley
On 24/02/2021 at 17:46, Smithee said:

My grandad was a ww2 German soldier and my stepdad's a descendent of Rob Roy McGregor. My mum's uncle (her stepdad's brother) was clan chief of the Fergussons of Dumfries but sold the title for whisky according to family legend.

 

Jim Cruickshank's a distant relative and so is Daniel O'Donnell, but no one admits to that one except an elderly cousin who won't shut up about it.

 

Almost everyone I know from Donegal claims to be a cousin of Daniel O'Donnell.

 

My family tree goes back to Dublin so, of course, I'm related to James Joyce.

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On 24/02/2021 at 19:37, GinRummy said:

One of my ancestors was a Bligh loyalist on HMS Bounty. 

Pretty sure @John Findlay would have served alongside him.

 

:greggy:   Only jesting, John.  😀

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John Findlay
47 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Pretty sure @John Findlay would have served alongside him.

 

:greggy:   Only jesting, John.  😀

Not wrong Morgan. I was Christian Fletcher's right hand oppo😉

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Doing some further digging on my maternal grandad's side (and will do a lot more fact checking) but it's possible that my 14th Great Grandfather was Robert Sempill, the 3rd Lord Sempill.

 

- As master of Sempill he served in the court of James V

- Said to have murdered William Crichton, 5th Lord Crichton of Sanquar by stabbing him with a sword, got arrested and taken to Edinburgh Castle to be executed but his influential friends got him off

- His first wife was a fifth generation descendant of Robert II and also had ancestry including Malcom III of Scotland and St Margaret.

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2 hours ago, John Findlay said:

Not wrong Morgan. I was Christian Fletcher's right hand oppo😉

Good man, John.  👍

 

Thanks for confirming.  😀

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John Gentleman
13 hours ago, Ribble said:

Doing some further digging on my maternal grandad's side (and will do a lot more fact checking) but it's possible that my 14th Great Grandfather was Robert Sempill, the 3rd Lord Sempill.

 

- As master of Sempill he served in the court of James V

- Said to have murdered William Crichton, 5th Lord Crichton of Sanquar by stabbing him with a sword, got arrested and taken to Edinburgh Castle to be executed but his influential friends got him off

- His first wife was a fifth generation descendant of Robert II and also had ancestry including Malcom III of Scotland and St Margaret.

The ballad writing Sempills?

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  • 4 weeks later...
Baldwigforjack

According to my DNA results and Ancestry's DNA Stories I'm related to Richard Jordan Gatling, inventor of the Gatling Gun.

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Spellczech

On my father's side Flora MacDonald was an ancestor according to my aunt who looked into this stuff. Another aunt on my mother's side says an ancestor was a ******* son of a housemaid at some pile on the west coast. Apparently the child looked very like Prince Albert who was known to have visited and stayed at the house. 

 

I should probably be the king of Scotland and the UK...

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muldoon74
6 minutes ago, Spellczech said:

On my father's side Flora MacDonald was an ancestor according to my aunt who looked into this stuff. Another aunt on my mother's side says an ancestor was a ******* son of a housemaid at some pile on the west coast. Apparently the child looked very like Prince Albert who was known to have visited and stayed at the house. 

 

I should probably be the king of Scotland and the UK...

Or have been born born with a massive piece of metal through your cock...

 

Apparently that's how these things work.. 

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The Frenchman Returns

Was doing my tree last week, using the DNA links to cross refer and got back one more generation on my paternal grandfathers side. Would appear that my 6 times great grandmother has a statue commemorating her in Tranent. Her name was Jackie / Joan Crookston and she led the people against the British army in a protest against conscription and was killed for her troubles. Bit of a republican.

 

'Massacre of Tranent' memorial in Civic Square, Tranent, East Lothian.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacre_of_Tranent

 

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muldoon74
16 minutes ago, The Frenchman Returns said:

Was doing my tree last week, using the DNA links to cross refer and got back one more generation on my paternal grandfathers side. Would appear that my 6 times great grandmother has a statue commemorating her in Tranent. Her name was Jackie / Joan Crookston and she led the people against the British army in a protest against conscription and was killed for her troubles. Bit of a republican.

 

'Massacre of Tranent' memorial in Civic Square, Tranent, East Lothian.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacre_of_Tranent

 

My brother is a building contractor based in Yorkshire...

 

He's a regular for a person who is a professional genealogist... So they've done some work for free..

 

On my Fathers side there is a record between a William Leslie and Isabell Ramsey 1792 and 1976 in Tranent. 

 

3rd line down of lineage there is a Definite Leslie reference in marriage to [my family name].. 

 

Makes sense as on my fathers side there are records going back to [at least] the early 1700's... all living on Liberton, ..

 

My Great Grandfather was a foreman at Blackford Quarry.. Seems for several generations my (Dads side) family were Quarrymen... Records show Quarryman, labourer etc..

 

My Dad grew up in Liberton (Cumnor Crescent and Peveril Terrace[The Inch])... 

 

I don't know the specifics but somehow my Grandfather (dads side) married my Grandmother who is from Shotts. (Coal miners all the way...).

 

All I know of my Paternal Grandmothers side is that she (Grandma) was a psychiatric nurse at Hartwood Asylum in, probably the 30's. (She was born 1911..)

 

Having travelled the trainline from Livi to Glasgow a few times past Hartwood, Shotts etc.. I always get a bit emotional.. I just want to know some stories.. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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