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An #ActuallyAutistic thread


Zlatanable

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On 15/02/2020 at 14:25, BudgeUp said:

Thanks for taking the time to reply. Thanks for the work you do with kids like mine as well because without the help we received we'd be screwed. 

 

My wife accepted it almost instantly but he was 720g when born so she was expecting something.

 

The biggest thing that's hard to come to terms with is the fact they develop normally then stop, or in my own sons case regress

 

That's hard. 

 

As I said he's the happiest soul alive and I've been reading things about studies involving gut fauna so we've bought pro biotic mix that comes recommended. 

 

To be honest it's seen some difference but it proves the fact there is a learning disability there as well. Or maybe that's me going back to bargaining in the whole grief cycle

 

The thing that strikes me. There's something in the eyes with severe autism. It's almost like a vacant expression and it comes through in photos as well. Before the traits started showing there wasn't that look. 

 

I'm havering now. So I'll leave it there. This post has been almost therapeutic to write. 

Your reply touched on a couple of poignant nerves with me. My 5 year old boy is autistic, diagnosed last april but after two years of suspecting, wondering, hoping not but ultimately trying to accept what was different about our Henry. 

The bits you said about developing normally then stopping were the toughest in the early days, a wee alarm bell goes off in your head (in my wife's case, a great big klaxon after she had spent many years working with autistic/learning difficulties children & young adults) which is sooo hard to accept. The ideas & dreams you had for your child's life just vanish. They get replaced eventually, just very differently.

 

One of the early signs with Henry was that he would not meet your eyes, he is a lot lot better now but his eyes can still be vacant, or not have the arresting emotion of his little sister's eyes. He in general seems to , quite happily, exist in his own bubble in general.

We are lucky in that Henry's main issue is communication, he struggles to communicate likes/dislikes/wants and needs with us but with things like the Hanen programme and the upskilling of parents, our wavelengths are matching a lot more now. 

 

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6 hours ago, JamboGoggz said:

Your reply touched on a couple of poignant nerves with me. My 5 year old boy is autistic, diagnosed last april but after two years of suspecting, wondering, hoping not but ultimately trying to accept what was different about our Henry. 

The bits you said about developing normally then stopping were the toughest in the early days, a wee alarm bell goes off in your head (in my wife's case, a great big klaxon after she had spent many years working with autistic/learning difficulties children & young adults) which is sooo hard to accept. The ideas & dreams you had for your child's life just vanish. They get replaced eventually, just very differently.

 

One of the early signs with Henry was that he would not meet your eyes, he is a lot lot better now but his eyes can still be vacant, or not have the arresting emotion of his little sister's eyes. He in general seems to , quite happily, exist in his own bubble in general.

We are lucky in that Henry's main issue is communication, he struggles to communicate likes/dislikes/wants and needs with us but with things like the Hanen programme and the upskilling of parents, our wavelengths are matching a lot more now. 

 

Funnily enough mine is 5 as well. 

 

Mine is non verbal so communication is key like yerself. We use pictures of things he likes on cards. Pecks/pex or some such.

 

It works to a certain degree. 

 

Does yours stim out of frustration? 

 

Mine had this habit of making himself vomit by plunging his hands down his throat. Which was hard to cope with as parents and hard to explain to others.  He seems to have stopped since we stopped pushing him for things he was never going yo do. 

 

Now though I get so much joy out of him cos I accept he's happy.

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17 hours ago, BudgeUp said:

Funnily enough mine is 5 as well. 

 

Mine is non verbal so communication is key like yerself. We use pictures of things he likes on cards. Pecks/pex or some such.

 

It works to a certain degree. 

 

Does yours stim out of frustration? 

 

Mine had this habit of making himself vomit by plunging his hands down his throat. Which was hard to cope with as parents and hard to explain to others.  He seems to have stopped since we stopped pushing him for things he was never going yo do. 

 

Now though I get so much joy out of him cos I accept he's happy.

He has little tics when he's a bit overstimulated, flaps his hands a lot, jumps and jumps so we need to calm him quite often.

He used to lash out at his little sister, pinching or scratching her when he wanted her to go away or just get out of his face. With being at school though and us learning how to communicate with him through courses like Hanen, he has seemingly figured out how to say, stop Eloise or no, things like that. Not that she listens!

 

Henry is a very happy boy and it took us time to accept that he is happy doing his own thing in his bubble and he can't really be pushed into new things quickly so its all about our startegy to deal with that.

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On 14/02/2020 at 18:33, Craig Gordons Gloves said:

My oldest (11 next week) was diagnosed at age 3. Now, on the outside he's a fun loving, happy kid who likes hugs and stuff.  He's also had 7 years of therapy for speech, verbal apraxia and dispraxia as well as therapy for behavioral coping mechanisms.  He's in mainstream school and everything appears good. Alot of this is after my wife and I (mainly my wife) spent many days, weeks and months researching and getting him the support and help he needs AND that works.  He regressed for a period because   Where it impacts is where it's not seen.  He struggles massively with transitions and change, he can have meltdowns at what appears to be the most minor of things and my youngest was diagnosed with a form of PTSD related to living in an environment of massive unpredictability - playing happily with a loving older brother one second and the next having a screaming older brother losing his shit for no reason or being violent.  With that, my 9 year old has been very protective of him and gets him now. 

 

We've fought numerous and ongoing battles with the school district to get him what he needs and they only acquiesce after we're the ones that have done all the legwork (the teachers themselves have been amazing - the distruct not so much).  I can see the differences between him and his peers from school and my worry is that he's now going to middle school and then getting older that he is the easy target to be picked on and he won't even realize it's at his expense. Like someone said above, i love him to bits and know his life will be different and i really worry what will happen when we're not around. 

Hi @Craig Gordons Gloves

 

Thank you for sharing your story in this thread. I appreciate you telling it.

 

To be clear, I am #ActuallyAutistic, male, and nearly 50. 

I was diagnosed as Autistic late, aged 35, and later still, diagnosed dyslexic and dyspraxic. 

 

I have had to fight for things since aged 35, for stuff I am entitled to, so I am afraid that part may well continue, for you and yours. It appears that this is quite normal. One has to keep learning, and figure out the moments to put your foot down, and stand up to it.

 

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Lot of good info on this thread, much like the depression thread.

 

My wife and I are foster carers and have an 8 year old who has just been diagnosed. We had no experience of this at all but could tell that he likely was autistic. The signs were all there from the severe and sudden meltdowns that he could not stop, spinning in circles while stimming, flapping and facial contortions when he had his senses over stimulated. Toys would be lined up in a specific order, almost speaking to himself in "tongues". 

 

Incredibly to us his school marked him low in the assessment process however we argued that this was because the school have been fantastic with him and know not to change routines for him as this causes him to react badly. We appealed the decision and he spent a day being observed by an assessor who confirmed our thoughts, still waiting to find out what support he can get going forward but it is our duty to get him as much support as we can.

 

As we get more experience we can spot likely triggers and can try to stop things before they develop or can help by reassuring him and helping him work through it. Things are getting better but it's tough so I can empathise with anyone who has the condition or is caring for someone with it.

 

An additional issue, and it's a big one for him and us is that he suffers badly from encopresis (Google it if you don't know what that is) which is linked to the ASD and is starting to effect him emotionally as he gets older and more self aware.

 

Aside from this he is a funny, caring and happy little boy, he was none of these things 3 years ago when he came to us.

 

Oh and if that wasn't enough we are taking into our care a 4 year old next week who has similar traits. 🥺

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1 hour ago, graygo said:

Lot of good info on this thread, much like the depression thread.

 

My wife and I are foster carers and have an 8 year old who has just been diagnosed. We had no experience of this at all but could tell that he likely was autistic. The signs were all there from the severe and sudden meltdowns that he could not stop, spinning in circles while stimming, flapping and facial contortions when he had his senses over stimulated. Toys would be lined up in a specific order, almost speaking to himself in "tongues". 

 

Incredibly to us his school marked him low in the assessment process however we argued that this was because the school have been fantastic with him and know not to change routines for him as this causes him to react badly. We appealed the decision and he spent a day being observed by an assessor who confirmed our thoughts, still waiting to find out what support he can get going forward but it is our duty to get him as much support as we can.

 

As we get more experience we can spot likely triggers and can try to stop things before they develop or can help by reassuring him and helping him work through it. Things are getting better but it's tough so I can empathise with anyone who has the condition or is caring for someone with it.

 

An additional issue, and it's a big one for him and us is that he suffers badly from encopresis (Google it if you don't know what that is) which is linked to the ASD and is starting to effect him emotionally as he gets older and more self aware.

 

Aside from this he is a funny, caring and happy little boy, he was none of these things 3 years ago when he came to us.

 

Oh and if that wasn't enough we are taking into our care a 4 year old next week who has similar traits. 🥺

 

Respect to you and your wife for being foster carers. Thats a fine thing you are doing. 

 

I am #ActuallyAutistic and near enough 50 years old, and my mum was autistic before many people got diagnosed (my Mum was never officially diagnosed). I got my diagnosis when I was 35. 

So your story is quite different to my story. 

 

I recognise the 'speaking in tongues' thing right away. I am dyslexic, yet have good language skills. I make up spoken language very easily. I suppose people observing me do this might assume I am insane, or mentally challenged, or perhaps I am schizophrenic. But it is just me playing about with my spoken language skills. 

 

The stimulation thing is interesting. I have never 'solved' how to contain the peaks and troughs of stimulation. I know I can de-sensitise myself with alcohol, and other drugs. I can also de-sensitise myself by spending time in a dark, silent room. And being alone and avoiding everything. And other things. 

 

At the end of the day, people who are autistic are very sensitive to stimuli.

Whether that be colour, light, sound, vibration, smell, mood, intentions, power, touch, taste and lots more.

 

Also if something upsets me, it isn't necessarily the existence of that thing, that is upsetting me. It is more like my understanding of the meaning of that thing, is upsetting me.

Like maybe people are doing a a certain thing to indicate I am unwelcome, but it isn't clear. (this is my thing, I know, but its part of an explanation)

 

Well, I think I have reached a natural limit in my reply here. 

 

 

Thank you, and your wife, for your kindness and spirit.

Take care.  

 

Edited by Zlatanable
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Meeting last night was useful. Hearts seem like they want to do more to make match days more engaging for folk with Autism.

 

I've even volunteered my help if I can......(Disclaimer....I'm not helping Autistic fans of other clubs 😅)

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My son is autistic and I recognise some of the traits, to a lesser degree, in myself. 

 

He's P6 at mainstream school and to a degree I feel like we've been through the worst in terms of not knowing what was going on but now I know his triggers. 

 

My wife and I separated 3 years ago and so I live myself with him and his younger brother half the time. I like to think I'm doing as much as I can for him that's reasonable or sensible at this stage but she has completely unrealistic expectations of how everyone has to deal with him.

 

She will complain for example if someone raises their voice to him or if he has a falling out at school because someone has touched him. He knows that she has always got his back so pushes the boundaries himself in his behaviour with me, his brother, grandparents etc. Most of the stress in my life comes from her, not having an autistic son, but both combined are very exhausting. 

 

 

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On 05/03/2020 at 18:46, Poseidon said:

My son is autistic and I recognise some of the traits, to a lesser degree, in myself. 

 

He's P6 at mainstream school and to a degree I feel like we've been through the worst in terms of not knowing what was going on but now I know his triggers. 

 

My wife and I separated 3 years ago and so I live myself with him and his younger brother half the time. I like to think I'm doing as much as I can for him that's reasonable or sensible at this stage but she has completely unrealistic expectations of how everyone has to deal with him.

 

She will complain for example if someone raises their voice to him or if he has a falling out at school because someone has touched him. He knows that she has always got his back so pushes the boundaries himself in his behaviour with me, his brother, grandparents etc. Most of the stress in my life comes from her, not having an autistic son, but both combined are very exhausting. 

 

 

This a complicated story @Poseidon

 

I noticed you said you regognise some of the traits of your son's autism in yourself. Have you considered asking your GP about getting a diagnosis for yourself?

 

All I can say is be positive. Because being negative is exhausting. 

Take care

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How are you all doing?

 

I kind of wish there was a disability thread on here.

 

I think the care/support sector will be difficult. And the people that rely on these people will have to cope. 

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2 hours ago, Zlatanable said:

How are you all doing?

 

I kind of wish there was a disability thread on here.

 

I think the care/support sector will be difficult. And the people that rely on these people will have to cope. 

 

The wife and I have signed up for a 30 hour course on autism in children split over 10 weeks, Coronavirus allowing. Hopefully will learn a few more strategies, often find I get just as much from speaking to others attending these types of things than I do from the actual course 

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chuck berrys hairline
6 hours ago, Zlatanable said:

How are you all doing?

 

I kind of wish there was a disability thread on here.

 

I think the care/support sector will be difficult. And the people that rely on these people will have to cope. 

 

My son is autistic and 8 im a single parent and his main carer. Hes absolutley loving this virus as he gets more time off school 😂. My son absolutely hates mainstream school but theres no other places to put him. Schools actually changing their approach to autism and currently making a specialist classroom to house all similar students. On other hand ive got the mother wanting more contact if hes off. Thing is like school he doesnt like it there. I feel like im mentally torturing him at time by sending him but im duty bound by court order. I know why he feels like this as shes not as hands on as me and has all her owm mental problems (depression, anxiety, ptsd, split personality) so even trying to say anything causes a shitstorm. Now he got put into my care by social work ive had to leave job and everything. But i wouldmt change the last two years for anything ive learned so much. Tbh i feel stuck as his two main triggers can be at school and mum whem hes in my vicinity. May i add im not bad to his mum i allow her to stay over etc aswell as his sister so im more accomadting tham most. I feel like i have to put my happiness and health to the side for evwryone elses expense. We haven't been offered any sort of therapy or stuff hes also only moderate. Just changes and social problems he has. I try to guide him best but we clash (parents) over best course of action. She always tries to overrule me as a mother and sometimes i let it slide but then it effects me afterwards. Tbh i feel like im the only one who actually understands him so he doesnt want to let me go or be anywhere else ots hard i need my time to recuperate also he does love his mum he just doesnt like her!

 

Sorry for the ramble i had to let loose. 

Edited by chuck berrys hairline
Sp/fudge fingers
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I think I’m undiagnosed with something. I really don’t like being touched, like being on my own even though I’m married and could quite happily go days without speaking to anyone. I wouldn’t say I’m anti social I just don’t like many people. Even hugging family makes me uncomfortable 

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13 hours ago, chuck berrys hairline said:

 

My son is autistic and 8 im a single parent and his main carer. Hes absolutley loving this virus as he gets more time off school 😂. My son absolutely hates mainstream school but theres no other places to put him. Schools actually changing their approach to autism and currently making a specialist classroom to house all similar students. On other hand ive got the mother wanting more contact if hes off. Thing is like school he doesnt like it there. I feel like im mentally torturing him at time by sending him but im duty bound by court order. I know why he feels like this as shes not as hands on as me and has all her owm mental problems (depression, anxiety, ptsd, split personality) so even trying to say anything causes a shitstorm. Now he got put into my care by social work ive had to leave job and everything. But i wouldmt change the last two years for anything ive learned so much. Tbh i feel stuck as his two main triggers can be at school and mum whem hes in my vicinity. May i add im not bad to his mum i allow her to stay over etc aswell as his sister so im more accomadting tham most. I feel like i have to put my happiness and health to the side for evwryone elses expense. We haven't been offered any sort of therapy or stuff hes also only moderate. Just changes and social problems he has. I try to guide him best but we clash (parents) over best course of action. She always tries to overrule me as a mother and sometimes i let it slide but then it effects me afterwards. Tbh i feel like im the only one who actually understands him so he doesnt want to let me go or be anywhere else ots hard i need my time to recuperate also he does love his mum he just doesnt like her!

 

Sorry for the ramble i had to let loose. 

Thanks for saying.

 

I know where there is an autistic person, there are usually family arguments not far behind. It's a complicated thing to happen to a unit of people. It will find weak points and pressure them. If you know what I mean.

 

I hated school, and missed a lot, cos I couldn't deal with so many things that were there. Mainly relationships with people, looking back. Not much my parents could have done. 

I loved the EIS strikes when I was at high school. More time to watch Star Wars/Aliens/Terminator etc and general lazing about with computer games, music and what not.

 

Thanks of your interesting post. Best wishes.

 

 

 

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19 hours ago, graygo said:

 

The wife and I have signed up for a 30 hour course on autism in children split over 10 weeks, Coronavirus allowing. Hopefully will learn a few more strategies, often find I get just as much from speaking to others attending these types of things than I do from the actual course 

I hope you both gain some insights from your course, and strategies. 

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11 hours ago, Jamhammer said:

I think I’m undiagnosed with something. I really don’t like being touched, like being on my own even though I’m married and could quite happily go days without speaking to anyone. I wouldn’t say I’m anti social I just don’t like many people. Even hugging family makes me uncomfortable 

Hi

I self-diagnosed after doing some tests in a book about autism. I did not think I was autistic when got the book. 

 

The tests were: Autism Quotient, Empathy Quotient, Systemising Quotient and '“Reading the Mind in the Eyes” Test. 

These tests, as far as I am aware, are current diagnostic tools in the NHS for diagnosing Autism. 

 

Google them., if you want to. Try some. 

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20 hours ago, Jamhammer said:

I think I’m undiagnosed with something. I really don’t like being touched, like being on my own even though I’m married and could quite happily go days without speaking to anyone. I wouldn’t say I’m anti social I just don’t like many people. Even hugging family makes me uncomfortable 

Sociopath?

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1 hour ago, ri Alban said:

Sociopath?

No. Looked it up and, if anything I’m over considerate when it comes to other people’s feelings. I was talking to the Bairn about it last night. Funny how I like to be in my football tribe and music tribe though

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10 hours ago, Zlatanable said:

Hi

I self-diagnosed after doing some tests in a book about autism. I did not think I was autistic when got the book. 

 

The tests were: Autism Quotient, Empathy Quotient, Systemising Quotient and '“Reading the Mind in the Eyes” Test. 

These tests, as far as I am aware, are current diagnostic tools in the NHS for diagnosing Autism. 

 

Google them., if you want to. Try some. 

I’m quite empathetic and, certainly since my daughter was born will cry at the drop of a hat at sad stuff.

Cheers I'll have a look at those 

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As its only just after 10.20 I'm drinking coffee, the vodka is open but I'll give it another 10 mins before I pour myself one.

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How are you all getting along?

If you are either #ActuallyAutistic yourself, or have Autistic people in your family. 

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rudi must stay
On 26/02/2020 at 00:36, Zlatanable said:

I'm late 40's and male. 

I often struggle to communicate, even though I can be very literate verbally and literally. 

 

When the other person is accusing me of things I believe I am innocent of, in that heated moment, I become a bad sort of on fire, and depending on the circumstance, I occasionally fall back on to my pure anger. And my pure anger is always me, and part of me. 

 

I lose my myself in these moments less often these days, because since my dyslexia diagnosis, I have had to admit, I misunderstand people in writing more often. So I have relaxed and accepted myself. 

 

Nice to hear from you. 

  

 

 

 

Totally understand this post

 

I could be accused of being shy. But I'm the same as you. I understand myself, I don't like conflict and I don't talk to people I don't like. I have the same fire though and I dislike myself for it, but having been in @@@@ jobs and done nothing I think it's healthier to react than bottle things up so keep it up 👍

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rudi must stay
On 14/03/2020 at 10:46, Jamhammer said:

I think I’m undiagnosed with something. I really don’t like being touched, like being on my own even though I’m married and could quite happily go days without speaking to anyone. I wouldn’t say I’m anti social I just don’t like many people. Even hugging family makes me uncomfortable 

 

Introvert

 

I'm one too my flatmate told me but tbh he was just a bit of a **** and I didn't like talking to him 

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4 hours ago, rudi must stay said:

 

Introvert

 

I'm one too my flatmate told me but tbh he was just a bit of a **** and I didn't like talking to him 

I'm not miserable with it and I think my Mrs is just used to me now. She used to moan at me cos it was obvious if I really didn't like someone but I've got better at hiding that with age.

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I am bumping this thread, to reach out to people, with Autistic people in their family, in this current moment, 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Mad Dog Logan

Thanks to the OP for starting this thread, wish I had noticed it earlier.

 

My sister has not long turned 50 and is at the severe end of the autism spectrum, she was a perfectly normal child until receiving a faulty vaccine when she was two. She lived with my parents and myself until she was about ten, she then became too much of a handful for my mum and dad and has lived in care ever since.

 

Like a lot of autistic people she likes to keep to a routine, doing certain things on certain days of the week etc, because of covid 19 her world has been turned upside down. Banging her head of walls and hand biting has now become the norm and doesn't like her change of routine, she can't understand why she isn't allowed to visit her mummy on a Wednesday and Saturday as normal.

 

For her the sooner the lockdown is over with the better...   

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There is no evidence that vaccines cause people to become #ActuallyAutistic , 

 

also, 5G towers don't appear to spread anything other than digital information. 

 

Edited by Zlatanable
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chuck berrys hairline

My sons the opposite this boomer doomer has removed so much stress from his life hes actually happier. No school or visitations to his mum which i was putting a stop too anyway as he came back from a contact marked with a three inch graze on his neck. She couldn't tell me how i was mortified by my sons answer. His school are a local hub so took him upto recieve a packed lunch amd no soon as got the goods he was outta there. So when this all gets lifted how do i go about explaining this. We do excercise as much as we can but its hard to motivate him at times. But when he does go out he goes for miles! Hes just so much more relaxed and calmer like sort of stimming again rather than losing the plot. Hate not being able to understand him and our perfect life is quarentine 😂 waiting on his new bmx style scooter today so he can offroad it where he wants. Me im alot calmer and still not touched a drop of alcohol yet either so coping well myself. Could do with a break but aslong as hes healthy and safe then my minds at rest.

 

Hope your ok zlatan seen on another thread your fond of the voddy and coke. How does that effect your autism? Its not something id give my son. However we were contemplating cbd before the holocough kicked off. Ive just been amazed by his progress. Even has patience now to look through a telescope and admire the 🌙.

 

Stay safe folks 💜

Edited by chuck berrys hairline
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Hi @chuck berrys hairline

 

Good to hear you and your family are healthy so far, during this.

 

I loved not going to school. Going to school was quite stressful, in the 70s and 80s for me.

It has taken me a long time to better understand other people. 

 

I am glad to hear you are calmer, and your son is calmer too. I hope you are both enjoying this bubble of a situation. 

 

I use alcohol, and have used marijuana. To me; it helps me lower my inhibitions, I look forward to it sometimes, regret it other times, the effect is quite pleasant. Quite like everyone else. 

 

Take care,  

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am bumping this thread here,

 

I have noticed big effects in my #ActuallyAutistic life, due to the dramatic decrease of dealing with other people in person. 

It's been very pleasant, a bit of a release. 

 

So if I am experiencing that, then other #ActuallyAutistic people, will probably be feeling changes by now, is my logic. 

Just in case anyone wanted to talk about Autism on here. 

 

Hope you are well and happy. 

Take care. 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
CavySlaveJambo
On 24/04/2020 at 01:46, Zlatanable said:

I am bumping this thread here,

 

I have noticed big effects in my #ActuallyAutistic life, due to the dramatic decrease of dealing with other people in person. 

It's been very pleasant, a bit of a release. 

 

So if I am experiencing that, then other #ActuallyAutistic people, will probably be feeling changes by now, is my logic. 

Just in case anyone wanted to talk about Autism on here. 

 

Hope you are well and happy. 

Take care. 

 

 

 

Thanks Zlatan. 

 

I am pretty much in a mess. 

 

Too much uncertainty going on, and the plans mentioned for lifting lockdown (separate and shield ones) have me literally panicking over something happening to my mum, made worse by the fact my sister is in Australia, and my dad also lives abroad, if anything happens to Mum.  

 

I am still going out for my walk, but that is all I am doing.  Mum is doing the shopping for me, and she is still coming in to support me on the days support aren't.  (Support a Vulnerable Person - yep)

At least the councils have FINALLY extended Blue Badge validity if they expired in early 2020, but only till September, and only for local authority parking. 

 

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5 hours ago, graygo said:

Id love to reply to the op but he's told me never to speak to him again. ☹️

 

:rofl:

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  • 6 months later...
15 hours ago, CavySlaveJambo said:

Howvis everyone doing now?

 

I am barely coping, changing with not coping...
 

I have mixed feelings about the lockdown. It is certainly helping working from home with childcare for my youngest daughter but I worry about my eldest daughter and two sons mental health with it all. It's all just a bit surreal and I lurch from ridiculously calm to burst out greeting anxiety attacks. 

Hope you manage to hang in there. Nothing lasts forever.

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CavySlaveJambo
11 hours ago, Ron Burgundy said:

I have mixed feelings about the lockdown. It is certainly helping working from home with childcare for my youngest daughter but I worry about my eldest daughter and two sons mental health with it all. It's all just a bit surreal and I lurch from ridiculously calm to burst out greeting anxiety attacks. 

Hope you manage to hang in there. Nothing lasts forever.

I’m really struggling. Everything is out of my control and to control anxiety I need to be able to control my life.  I need help but everything at the moment is over the phone and I can’t use the phone.  
 

I have my dog and my assistance dog puppy who are who I am hanging on for. 

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11 minutes ago, CavySlaveJambo said:

I’m really struggling. Everything is out of my control and to control anxiety I need to be able to control my life.  I need help but everything at the moment is over the phone and I can’t use the phone.  
 

I have my dog and my assistance dog puppy who are who I am hanging on for. 

 

Do you play any computer games? Second Life is meant to help a bit with that apparently.

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CavySlaveJambo

I only really play Animal Crossing

 

So an update, 

 

After 3 weeks of not coping and pretending I could, along with the concerns  over what I could STILL control and the consequences, the GP was called. 
 

But what was interesting, the GP was not at all surprised about the Autistic Mess,  and has also told mum (I don’t do phones) that either Covid and the restrictions are a disaster for people on the Spectrum.   
 

Now we still have to deal with the systematic discrimination against people with disabilities,  but we also have to deal with a government who is willing to deliberately ignore the harm caused to a large number of people. 

 

 

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CavySlaveJambo

Bumping for Autism Awareness Month which is this month 

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