Jump to content
Zlatanable

An #ActuallyAutistic thread

Recommended Posts

Zlatanable

A lot of people are #ActuallyAutistic

 

It might be you, or someone in your family, or someone you know in some way.

 

Feel free to contribute in any way you seem fit. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Iconic Idiot

My oldest son has autism. You would never really know unless you lived with him. He manages to function in social situations really well and has always attended mainstream education. He's currently at college studying Media.

I have often wondered if I myself am on the spectrum.

 

My heart goes out to all the parents and family of kids who are non verbal or seriously affected by it. I have been very lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
millerjames398
15 minutes ago, Iconic Idiot said:

My oldest son has autism. You would never really know unless you lived with him. He manages to function in social situations really well and has always attended mainstream education. He's currently at college studying Media.

I have often wondered if I myself am on the spectrum.

 

My heart goes out to all the parents and family of kids who are non verbal or seriously affected by it. I have been very lucky.

This is the same for me, my youngest was diagnosed 2 yrs ago, we always had suspicions, but still didn't prepare us for the results, he attends the local primary, and seems to be doing ok, infact he's doing great, although we've started to see the difference as his class mates mature, do find myself trying to analyse his behaviours, wondering if its just a 9yr old or if its down to his autism, its a constant worry, but wouldnt swap or change him for all the tea in china.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Der Kaiser

I teach kids with severe learning difficulties and/or autism. Always said my jobs tough but not as tough as the parents jobs.

Lack of sleep, constant stress, trying to keep routines, patience of dealing with being physically hurt by your own children....at least I get paid and kick them out the school door at 3:15.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Potter
16 minutes ago, Der Kaiser said:

I teach kids with severe learning difficulties and/or autism. Always said my jobs tough but not as tough as the parents jobs.

Lack of sleep, constant stress, trying to keep routines, patience of dealing with being physically hurt by your own children....at least I get paid and kick them out the school door at 3:15.

I bet you make a difference and help the kids, well done bud.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BudgeUp

I'm at the opposite end of the spectrum. My son is non verbal and has severe autism / learning difficulties. 

 

Happiest bugger about so that's all that matters. 

 

He's 5 and a half now and I've only just accepted he's not going to lead what I perceived to be a normal life. 

 

Now my biggest worry is his care after my wife and I are gone. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rudi must stay

 

12 hours ago, Iconic Idiot said:

My oldest son has autism. You would never really know unless you lived with him. He manages to function in social situations really well and has always attended mainstream education. He's currently at college studying Media.

I have often wondered if I myself am on the spectrum.

 

My heart goes out to all the parents and family of kids who are non verbal or seriously affected by it. I have been very lucky.

 

Bravo to him, I believe it is a choice and it's not easy ("the help" you receive is there to put you down or make you feel different). I myself have dyspraxia, it used to affect me socially and I'd stay in but getting out and about and being independent is the way to be, I hate alot of this spectrum rubbish, I remember a Louis Theroux documentary that said extreme happiness showed you were autistic, so you get a new job or win the lottery and you're autistic, what a lot of rubbish. Everybodys on the spectrum  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hughesie27
1 hour ago, rudi must stay said:

 

 

Bravo to him, I believe it is a choice and it's not easy ("the help" you receive is there to put you down or make you feel different). I myself have dyspraxia, it used to affect me socially and I'd stay in but getting out and about and being independent is the way to be, I hate alot of this spectrum rubbish, I remember a Louis Theroux documentary that said extreme happiness showed you were autistic, so you get a new job or win the lottery and you're autistic, what a lot of rubbish. Everybodys on the spectrum  

No they aren't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AlphonseCapone
5 hours ago, hughesie27 said:

No they aren't.

 

They most likely are. The idea that for things like autism, where there is a complex mix of behaviours involved, that it's a simple have or have not diagnosis is antiquated. Most models consider everyone on a spectrum, while only those at a certain end would be classed as autistic, some people might be close on the spectrum, or a little further but still exhibit some characteristics and other people no where near.

 

The same idea works for a range of things like anxiety or even bipolar. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Der Kaiser
13 hours ago, BudgeUp said:

I'm at the opposite end of the spectrum. My son is non verbal and has severe autism / learning difficulties. 

 

Happiest bugger about so that's all that matters. 

 

He's 5 and a half now and I've only just accepted he's not going to lead what I perceived to be a normal life. 

 

Now my biggest worry is his care after my wife and I are gone. 

 

The acceptance is a big thing and it's right to come to terms imo.

I've known parents at my school that still dont seem to come to accept that their children reach a bit of a glass ceiling with their cognitive skills....even kids in their mid teens. 

 

I once told a parent their kid was really enjoying their music sessions and they asked me about what instrument I would recommend. I was trying to explain it was a sensory thing but they were adamant they would get them something like a trumpet to learn.

Other parents insisted on no babyish toys. Their kid was in their teens but had been diagnosed at a mental age of 2-3. Despite me telling them how much their kid loved toy cars and trains and how happy they were playing with them they didnt want them having any as it was embarrassing if they ever went out and they were vrooming about.

 

Life skills is the really important thing. Being able to go out, use public transport, eat independently,  toilet independently etc. These things take a long time and need lots of work, repeating and getting good routines but they make a big positive impact...much more than being able to tell time or count money or write their name.

 

As I say...your job is the hardest and it's the one that makes the biggest impact. You see kids with really severe learning difficulties but a lot of times when their parent arrives at school you can see that although they cant communicate their body language, their posture and expressions show they are so happy to see someone they that love.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hughesie27
2 hours ago, AlphonseCapone said:

 

They most likely are. The idea that for things like autism, where there is a complex mix of behaviours involved, that it's a simple have or have not diagnosis is antiquated. Most models consider everyone on a spectrum, while only those at a certain end would be classed as autistic, some people might be close on the spectrum, or a little further but still exhibit some characteristics and other people no where near.

 

The same idea works for a range of things like anxiety or even bipolar. 

It's just not the case I'm afraid. Having Autism significantly impacts the individuals life. There are of course certain people with very mild symptoms or that can present themselves as typical in everyday life but it takes a few different aspects to get a diagnosis.

 

Just because someone hates the "big light" being on and needs to wash their hands twice before leaving the bathroom doesn't make them "a wee bit autistic".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AlphonseCapone
12 minutes ago, hughesie27 said:

It's just not the case I'm afraid. Having Autism significantly impacts the individuals life. There are of course certain people with very mild symptoms or that can present themselves as typical in everyday life but it takes a few different aspects to get a diagnosis.

 

Just because someone hates the "big light" being on and needs to wash their hands twice before leaving the bathroom doesn't make them "a wee bit autistic".

 

It's literally referred to as a spectrum disorder;

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/autism/what-is-autism/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hughesie27
1 minute ago, AlphonseCapone said:

 

It's literally referred to as a spectrum disorder;

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/autism/what-is-autism/

Of course Autism has a spectrum but Rudi Must Stay said that everybody is on that spectrum. I disagree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rudi must stay
2 hours ago, AlphonseCapone said:

 

They most likely are. The idea that for things like autism, where there is a complex mix of behaviours involved, that it's a simple have or have not diagnosis is antiquated. Most models consider everyone on a spectrum, while only those at a certain end would be classed as autistic, some people might be close on the spectrum, or a little further but still exhibit some characteristics and other people no where near.

 

The same idea works for a range of things like anxiety or even bipolar. 

 

Yes it's a minefield currently. But everyone's treated the same

 

13 minutes ago, hughesie27 said:

It's just not the case I'm afraid. Having Autism significantly impacts the individuals life. There are of course certain people with very mild symptoms or that can present themselves as typical in everyday life but it takes a few different aspects to get a diagnosis.

 

Just because someone hates the "big light" being on and needs to wash their hands twice before leaving the bathroom doesn't make them "a wee bit autistic".

 

It would these days to these experts. Honestly mate, they really a disgriminatory and arrogant bunch. Very few I've met I've liked. Part of the problem  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JamboGoggz
13 minutes ago, hughesie27 said:

It's just not the case I'm afraid. Having Autism significantly impacts the individuals life. There are of course certain people with very mild symptoms or that can present themselves as typical in everyday life but it takes a few different aspects to get a diagnosis.

 

Just because someone hates the "big light" being on and needs to wash their hands twice before leaving the bathroom doesn't make them "a wee bit autistic".

Disagree entirely, we are all on the spectrum to different degrees. Is this a personal opinion or do you have expertise?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hughesie27
5 minutes ago, JamboGoggz said:

Disagree entirely, we are all on the spectrum to different degrees. Is this a personal opinion or do you have expertise?

 

6 years of working with adults and children living with Autism in Scotland and Australia in both school and residential environments.

 

 

What's maybe making people think that it is a widespread or all encompassing spectrum is because awareness about it has boosted massively in the last couple of years and diagnosis techniques have resulted in a big jump of people getting diagnosed.

Edited by hughesie27

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dobmisterdobster

I am #ActuallyAutistic if you want to call it that.

 

I was diagnosed aged 7. The condition has made life more difficult.

But I turned out ok. I'm married with kids, have a job and lead a fairly normal life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rudi must stay
7 minutes ago, hughesie27 said:

6 years of working with adults and children living with Autism in Scotland and Australia in both school and residential environments.

 

 

What's maybe making people think that it is a widespread or all encompassing spectrum is because awareness about it has boosted massively in the last couple of years and diagnosis techniques have resulted in a big jump of people getting diagnosed.

 

Very interesting, that's a tough job so well done to you 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AlphonseCapone
32 minutes ago, hughesie27 said:

Of course Autism has a spectrum but Rudi Must Stay said that everybody is on that spectrum. I disagree.

 

Ah right I see, I follow what you're saying now. I find the notion of a spectrum a better way to look at this and many things, whether it includes people on the zero end of the spectrum is neither here nor there I guess. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Craig Gordons Gloves

My oldest (11 next week) was diagnosed at age 3. Now, on the outside he's a fun loving, happy kid who likes hugs and stuff.  He's also had 7 years of therapy for speech, verbal apraxia and dispraxia as well as therapy for behavioral coping mechanisms.  He's in mainstream school and everything appears good. Alot of this is after my wife and I (mainly my wife) spent many days, weeks and months researching and getting him the support and help he needs AND that works.  He regressed for a period because   Where it impacts is where it's not seen.  He struggles massively with transitions and change, he can have meltdowns at what appears to be the most minor of things and my youngest was diagnosed with a form of PTSD related to living in an environment of massive unpredictability - playing happily with a loving older brother one second and the next having a screaming older brother losing his shit for no reason or being violent.  With that, my 9 year old has been very protective of him and gets him now. 

 

We've fought numerous and ongoing battles with the school district to get him what he needs and they only acquiesce after we're the ones that have done all the legwork (the teachers themselves have been amazing - the distruct not so much).  I can see the differences between him and his peers from school and my worry is that he's now going to middle school and then getting older that he is the easy target to be picked on and he won't even realize it's at his expense. Like someone said above, i love him to bits and know his life will be different and i really worry what will happen when we're not around. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lemongrab
4 hours ago, AlphonseCapone said:

 

Ah right I see, I follow what you're saying now. I find the notion of a spectrum a better way to look at this and many things, whether it includes people on the zero end of the spectrum is neither here nor there I guess. 

The autism spectrum has high function types at one end, like Aspergers, and classic autism, with its associated severe learning difficulties, at the other end.

 

Autism spectrum disorders are characterised by a triad of impairments, where there is a problem with social communication, social understanding and imagination. Just because someone has a single trait associated with autism doesn't mean they are partially autistic. That would be like someone who enjoyed having a drink saying they were a bit of an alcoholic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AlphonseCapone
5 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

The autism spectrum has high function types at one end, like Aspergers, and classic autism, with its associated severe learning difficulties, at the other end.

 

Autism spectrum disorders are characterised by a triad of impairments, where there is a problem with social communication, social understanding and imagination. Just because someone has a single trait associated with autism doesn't mean they are partially autistic. That would be like someone who enjoyed having a drink saying they were a bit of an alcoholic.

 

Only if you are thinking of the disorder in terms of counting traits. But traits aren't as simple as you have it or don't, either. Social understanding for example, isn't as simple as having it or not. 

The alcoholic thing isn't relevant here. Just like you can't be on a spectrum of having cancer. It only works in certain disorders. 

Edited by AlphonseCapone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boof
8 hours ago, Der Kaiser said:
8 hours ago, Der Kaiser said:

Other parents insisted on no babyish toys. Their kid was in their teens but had been diagnosed at a mental age of 2-3. Despite me telling them how much their kid loved toy cars and trains and how happy they were playing with them they didnt want them having any as it was embarrassing if they ever went out and they were vrooming about.

 

 

Wouldn't life be a bit easier for parents and carers if certain members of the general public weren't such judgmental arseholes. Yes, we need more knowledge/education about certain conditions but with the sheer number of invisible disabilities kicking about can't folk just be a little bit more compassionate?

 

We're only on this planet for a wee while - it's not too difficult not to be a *****.

Edited by Boof
Autocorrect put in an incorrect apostrophe - dick of a thing that it is!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lemongrab
1 hour ago, AlphonseCapone said:

 

Only if you are thinking of the disorder in terms of counting traits. But traits aren't as simple as you have it or don't, either. Social understanding for example, isn't as simple as having it or not. 

The alcoholic thing isn't relevant here. Just like you can't be on a spectrum of having cancer. It only works in certain disorders. 

That's how it's diagnosed though. Someone with autism has all 3 traits to a lesser or greater degree. The degree which each individual has them is different for every single person, but they must all be there. Someone presenting with one or two of the traits might be diagnosed with some developmental condition akin to autism, but it is not autism and will not be on the autism spectrum.  It sounds like you're making your own criteria as to what constitutes autism.

 

As for the alcoholic thing, it was a, perhaps flippant, example of how someone showing one symptom of a condition does not necessarily have that condition. 😀 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CavySlaveJambo
9 hours ago, hughesie27 said:

It's just not the case I'm afraid. Having Autism significantly impacts the individuals life. There are of course certain people with very mild symptoms or that can present themselves as typical in everyday life but it takes a few different aspects to get a diagnosis.


I am #actuallyautistic .  I was diagnosed in high school but the signs were there back when I was a young girl. And by young girl I actually mean my third birthday party, where we have video evidence. 
 

Technically I have been diagnosed with “mild” aspergers but to be honest for me it is in really disabling. Chances are by the time I was diagnosed I was probably masking a lot as female autistics do. 
 

 I mean there is stuff I do and I can “cope” without any support for a week or two (maybe three) but after that everything is a struggle.  I rarely go out of my own and even then it is hard.   I used to go to Tynie unsupported and I would go home so exhausted, however now that It has been suggested I go with a personal assistant it helps a lot.  Buses are horrendous and I barely cope most of the time and that is limiting bus use to certain buses or certain times . As for driving I would not be safe to drive.   When I get so stressed I lose the ability to speak. As for working, nope, relationships, nope.  My best friend is a dog (and not for the first time) bullied through school. 


 

That is the reality that this is what high functioning ASD actually can be. Also being autistic has meant there are things I would have loved to do but Autism Sucks and because of that I have not been able to do them. 

 

And then you add in the mental health crap! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable

This has turned into a lively, and many-faceted conversation hasn't it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
3 hours ago, Lemongrab said:

The autism spectrum has high function types at one end, like Aspergers, and classic autism, with its associated severe learning difficulties, at the other end.

 

Autism spectrum disorders are characterised by a triad of impairments, where there is a problem with social communication, social understanding and imagination. Just because someone has a single trait associated with autism doesn't mean they are partially autistic. That would be like someone who enjoyed having a drink saying they were a bit of an alcoholic.

Hello @Lemongrab

This is an older understanding of #ActuallyAutisic I believe. 

It was an understanding for it's reasons, but it failed to adequately explain people who are Autistic. 

 

A newer framework exists. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Der Kaiser
3 hours ago, Boof said:

 

Wouldn't life be a bit easier for parents and carers if certain members of the general public weren't such judgmental arseholes.

 

Absolutely. 

 

But humans are awful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boof
22 minutes ago, Der Kaiser said:

 

Absolutely. 

 

But humans are awful.

 

Thankfully not all of 'em and not all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rudi must stay
1 hour ago, Der Kaiser said:

 

Absolutely. 

 

But humans are awful.

 

We are yes. Truelly awful but all you can do is keep going.

 

That irritates people more than anything else 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lemongrab
13 hours ago, Zlatanable said:

Hello @Lemongrab

This is an older understanding of #ActuallyAutisic I believe. 

It was an understanding for it's reasons, but it failed to adequately explain people who are Autistic. 

 

A newer framework exists. 

 

13 hours ago, Zlatanable said:

Thanks for that, I'll have a look. 👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BudgeUp
On 14/02/2020 at 11:21, Der Kaiser said:

 

The acceptance is a big thing and it's right to come to terms imo.

I've known parents at my school that still dont seem to come to accept that their children reach a bit of a glass ceiling with their cognitive skills....even kids in their mid teens. 

 

I once told a parent their kid was really enjoying their music sessions and they asked me about what instrument I would recommend. I was trying to explain it was a sensory thing but they were adamant they would get them something like a trumpet to learn.

Other parents insisted on no babyish toys. Their kid was in their teens but had been diagnosed at a mental age of 2-3. Despite me telling them how much their kid loved toy cars and trains and how happy they were playing with them they didnt want them having any as it was embarrassing if they ever went out and they were vrooming about.

 

Life skills is the really important thing. Being able to go out, use public transport, eat independently,  toilet independently etc. These things take a long time and need lots of work, repeating and getting good routines but they make a big positive impact...much more than being able to tell time or count money or write their name.

 

As I say...your job is the hardest and it's the one that makes the biggest impact. You see kids with really severe learning difficulties but a lot of times when their parent arrives at school you can see that although they cant communicate their body language, their posture and expressions show they are so happy to see someone they that love.

 

Thanks for taking the time to reply. Thanks for the work you do with kids like mine as well because without the help we received we'd be screwed. 

 

My wife accepted it almost instantly but he was 720g when born so she was expecting something.

 

The biggest thing that's hard to come to terms with is the fact they develop normally then stop, or in my own sons case regress. 

 

That's hard. 

 

As I said he's the happiest soul alive and I've been reading things about studies involving gut fauna so we've bought pro biotic mix that comes recommended. 

 

To be honest it's seen some difference but it proves the fact there is a learning disability there as well. Or maybe that's me going back to bargaining in the whole grief cycle. 

 

The thing that strikes me. There's something in the eyes with severe autism. It's almost like a vacant expression and it comes through in photos as well. Before the traits started showing there wasn't that look. 

 

I'm havering now. So I'll leave it there. This post has been almost therapeutic to write. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable

I want to get a bit philosophical about the issue of being #ActuallyAutistic.

 

Before I do, I need to accept certain things.

 

I accept your right to challenge me about anything, and everything, I say.

I accept your right to express yourself.

I accept I have the right to challenge anyone. 

I accept your right to challenge anyone. 

 

I accept that these things are aims, and that these things occur, from time to time anyway.

 

I hope that us as individuals, can be part of a wider conversation about #ActuallyAutistic , in a truthful and forgiving atmosphere. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hughesie27
On 14/02/2020 at 13:35, rudi must stay said:

 

Very interesting, that's a tough job so well done to you 

Less tough when you enjoy doing it.👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rudi must stay
5 hours ago, hughesie27 said:

Less tough when you enjoy doing it.👍

 

You must have alot of patience to do a job like that. I don't think I could tbh 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marvin
On 12/02/2020 at 23:13, Zlatanable said:

A lot of people are #ActuallyAutistic

 

It might be you, or someone in your family, or someone you know in some way.

 

Feel free to contribute in any way you seem fit. 

 

 

 

 

My mate has Asperger's which is a form of autism. Anything computer related and he will solve the problems. However he doesn't recognise sarcasm which can have it's problems although nothing too serious. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
7 hours ago, Marvin said:

 

My mate has Asperger's which is a form of autism. Anything computer related and he will solve the problems. However he doesn't recognise sarcasm which can have it's problems although nothing too serious. 

Asperger's Syndrome, doesn't technically exist anymore, under DSM-5 in 2013. (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)

Although that is not the only thing that defines such things, but it is a big thing that defines such things. 

 

I often misinterpret what people mean in person, and in writing. And the older I get, the more I have become aware that my instinctual flight/fight response, for want of a better way of putting it, is an active part of how I interpret other people, especially with other males. 

 

With age has come a little wisdom, and you have to get to know yourself, so I am less reactive now, than I was. 

 

But I still get caught out by sarcasm right enough. I am sometimes so blind to peoples intentions. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Governor Tarkin
On ‎14‎/‎02‎/‎2020 at 19:45, Boof said:

 

We're only on this planet for a wee while - it's not too difficult not to be a *****.

 

Amen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
On 13/02/2020 at 11:50, Cruyff said:

a8c849cfcfe8ddaa6b244b8908548f2a.thumb.jpg.a9f413d50084b4c19dc9ec196290e925.jpg

I don't understand what you mean here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable

I have a duty to people who are #ActuallyAutistic , and I have a duty to everyone else that is disabled, 

 

Things need to change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madjambo21

My son has autism.

His temper can go from 0 to 100 in the blink of an eye.

As he has got older he has shown he can deal with it better.

Although trying to educate other parents at school who can see him as some monster child is tough.

They don't sit with him afterwards and see him drained physically and emotionally and see how it affects him.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cruyff
22 minutes ago, Zlatanable said:

I don't understand what you mean here. 

Of course you don't. 👍 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
5 minutes ago, Madjambo21 said:

My son has autism.

His temper can go from 0 to 100 in the blink of an eye.

As he has got older he has shown he can deal with it better.

Although trying to educate other parents at school who can see him as some monster child is tough.

They don't sit with him afterwards and see him drained physically and emotionally and see how it affects him.

 

 

hi @Madjambo21

im #actuallyautistic and late 40s. 

 

I can get intensely angry at things when they don't suit me. This remains a fact. Im late 40s, I get angry.

 

However- I have learned to accept my skillset, and adjust. 

 

I know my anger is sometimes because I simply cannot do what you ask.

Sometimes because I can do what you ask, but it takes a lot of effort.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madjambo21
2 hours ago, Zlatanable said:

hi @Madjambo21

im #actuallyautistic and late 40s. 

 

I can get intensely angry at things when they don't suit me. This remains a fact. Im late 40s, I get angry.

 

However- I have learned to accept my skillset, and adjust. 

 

I know my anger is sometimes because I simply cannot do what you ask.

Sometimes because I can do what you ask, but it takes a lot of effort.

 

That's probably one of my biggest concerns is how my son will adjust to deal with it as he gets older.

Worry about when he goes to high school as kids can be cruel at times.

 

Glad that you have learned to accept your skill set and adjust.

Makes me feel better about my son's future.

Thank you👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alex Kintner

My nephew has severe autism and is still unable to speak at 10 years old. Requires a lot of support but love him to bits. His smiles are amazing. Total respect to my sister and anybody else who is a carer for someone with ASD. 👍🏻

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CavySlaveJambo
On 22/02/2020 at 01:15, Madjambo21 said:

My son has autism.

His temper can go from 0 to 100 in the blink of an eye.

As he has got older he has shown he can deal with it better.

Although trying to educate other parents at school who can see him as some monster child is tough.

They don't sit with him afterwards and see him drained physically and emotionally and see how it affects him.

 

 

 

I am in my mid 30's and Female (so mask a lot - without knowing it)

 

Here is where I see it.  Everyone with ASD has a communication Disorder, so sometimes no matter how high functioning you are you struggle to communicate something is wrong.  So a meltdown will look like a temper tantrum.   Thing is chances are it is based on an inability to communicate a want or a need. Add in sensory overload too.  At times I get to the point speaking is so difficult I totally stutter. 

 

I still meltdown and afterwards really hate myself.  It is horrible.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madjambo21

 

6 hours ago, CavySlaveJambo said:

 

I am in my mid 30's and Female (so mask a lot - without knowing it)

 

Here is where I see it.  Everyone with ASD has a communication Disorder, so sometimes no matter how high functioning you are you struggle to communicate something is wrong.  So a meltdown will look like a temper tantrum.   Thing is chances are it is based on an inability to communicate a want or a need. Add in sensory overload too.  At times I get to the point speaking is so difficult I totally stutter. 

 

I still meltdown and afterwards really hate myself.  It is horrible.  

 

 

Really appreciate the insight from people that have similar issues and gives me a lot of hope for his future.

 

Hope you don't have many meltdowns and don't feel to hard on yourself. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zlatanable
On 24/02/2020 at 20:54, CavySlaveJambo said:

 

I am in my mid 30's and Female (so mask a lot - without knowing it)

 

Here is where I see it.  Everyone with ASD has a communication Disorder, so sometimes no matter how high functioning you are you struggle to communicate something is wrong.  So a meltdown will look like a temper tantrum.   Thing is chances are it is based on an inability to communicate a want or a need. Add in sensory overload too.  At times I get to the point speaking is so difficult I totally stutter. 

 

I still meltdown and afterwards really hate myself.  It is horrible.  

 

 

I'm late 40's and male. 

I often struggle to communicate, even though I can be very literate verbally and literally. 

 

When the other person is accusing me of things I believe I am innocent of, in that heated moment, I become a bad sort of on fire, and depending on the circumstance, I occasionally fall back on to my pure anger. And my pure anger is always me, and part of me. 

 

I lose my myself in these moments less often these days, because since my dyslexia diagnosis, I have had to admit, I misunderstand people in writing more often. So I have relaxed and accepted myself. 

 

Nice to hear from you. 

  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...