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Dementia in football ( Gordon McQueen diagnosed )


Ray Gin

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59 minutes ago, John Findlay said:

That's bollocks. 

No it's not....go up any Sunday afternoon as I've done for the last 18mths and you'll see for yourself....could let you know their 5 major points when assessing a player it will surprise you where they place skill and technique and it's not in the top 2 points...

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1 minute ago, Walter Burns said:

No it's not....go up any Sunday afternoon as I've done for the last 18mths and you'll see for yourself....could let you know their 5 major points when assessing a player it will surprise you where they place skill and technique and it's not in the top 2 points...

I've been up there and seen for myself my son is 2008.

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21 hours ago, Bauld said:

 

The SYFA is working hard to encourage coaches and teams to train players to take possession of the ball under pressure, have faith in themselves to dribble it more instead of pass, pass pass, hoof. They are trying to bring a more technical aspect to the game but too many coaches aren't following the teachings.

 

Trust me they are trying hard but it's not easy. Too many coaches and teams focus on winning not enough focus on actual development of players. 

Trying hard ?!? You must be joking. 

 

The SYFA coaching qualifications for amateur coaches are a complete joke. You turn up to do the entry level 1.1 as you coach five or six year olds and they spend all day telling you that the drills they are showing you are more appropriate for 9 yr olds. Meanwhile in Iceland you have UEFA A licence coaches coaching kids teams.

 

If you send your kids to a SFA run holiday camp the coaches stand about chatting to each other and staring at their phones and doing hee haw coaching.

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On 21/10/2019 at 12:55, Ray Gin said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/50124102?ns_campaign=bbc_match_of_the_day&ns_linkname=sport&ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR2DkfHV6Dmz7h1riDDdkGOo1ILCH9hMkR34alcGFhwbBW2pcDWfZi21ktg

 

Former professional footballers are three and a half times more likely to die of dementia than people of the same age range in the general population, according to new research.

This is only the beginning of this issue as the players that played in the late 1960s and 1970s get older.

 

I know that there are a number of former Hearts player that played in the 70s who now have a range of dementia related problems. For many these problems started surfacing about 10-15 years ago and have of course steadily worsened.

 

The football authorities not only have to look into the impact of heading the ball but   it is a disgrace how they have effectively washed their hands of the problem and offering pretty much no help to these former players and their families.

 

 

 

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highlandjambo3

I think there is a strong possibility we will start to see head protection in the future.......not hard hats of course but, more along the lines of those sausage sponge finger type things that some rugby players have.  I know the main header point is the front of the sweed but, it often skids off any part of the dome.

Edited by highlandjambo3
Although I am sure Aid would like the full NFL coupon protection after last week
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37 minutes ago, 77Mackay77 said:

Trying hard ?!? You must be joking. 

 

The SYFA coaching qualifications for amateur coaches are a complete joke. You turn up to do the entry level 1.1 as you coach five or six year olds and they spend all day telling you that the drills they are showing you are more appropriate for 9 yr olds. Meanwhile in Iceland you have UEFA A licence coaches coaching kids teams.

 

If you send your kids to a SFA run holiday camp the coaches stand about chatting to each other and staring at their phones and doing hee haw coaching.

 

I know several former pros coaching kids teams in my area with various levels of UEFA licence as well as some who haven't played at a high level with a C licence or higher.

 

I've also been with several Pro licence coaches watching them do sessions with 8-10yr olds and they were giving them the exact same stuff I had been shown back when I done my 1.1 

 

The methods handed out are not the problem.

 

Are you telling me EVERY kids team in Iceland has UEFA A licence coaches? I somehow doubt that. Every country relies on volunteer coaches, quite often parents, to go and learn the proper way to coach from their governing body and take that into the team they are in charge of. The problem doesn't come from the governing body it comes from coaches either pressing their own personal views onto the team or learning from older coaches who are part of a generation who have seen our game fall lower and lower since the 90s and have failed with their methods. That's not a generalization of those older coaches, some are brilliant but there are plenty who don't get the correct way to raise players for the modern game.

 

This is going off topic in this thread though so I won't be debating it any further here. This thread is important for other reasons.

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  • 1 year later...
  • davemclaren changed the title to Dementia in football ( Gordon McQueen diagnosed )
Dusk_Till_Dawn

The extent of this problem is not surprising but it is really worrying. Must be really concerning for a lot of ex pros wondering if they’ll be affected too. It’s good that they’re getting serious about research now but it’s come far too late. 

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davemclaren
36 minutes ago, Dusk_Till_Dawn said:

The extent of this problem is not surprising but it is really worrying. Must be really concerning for a lot of ex pros wondering if they’ll be affected too. It’s good that they’re getting serious about research now but it’s come far too late. 

It’s always good to know the medical risks of any activity and this one seems obvious. It does lead to questions as to how football, and other sports which include head percussion, adapt going forwards. 

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Neil Dongcaster

I forgot he played for Man Utd. Then again he probably has aswell.

 

(Sorry - all the best to him)

Edited by Neil Dongcaster
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andythejambo
On 28/10/2019 at 10:07, Ray Gin said:

 

3 grams difference between an old wet leather ball and modern footballs. Next to nothing.

 

The 3 grams doesn't take into account the water absorption that the old balls had. That added a significant extra weight. The modern balls are all water repellent.

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Tasavallan

My wife is a dementia care nurse.  I wish him well.

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27 minutes ago, andythejambo said:

The 3 grams doesn't take into account the water absorption that the old balls had. That added a significant extra weight. The modern balls are all water repellent.

 

According to this the 3 grams difference was after soaking an old ball in water.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/4123437.stm

 

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Stood beside him at a urinal in a God forsaken brick shitehoose at Love Street.

 

Not even that confident there was a urinal.

 

The light bulb had conked, it was a bit dark, and all of us in there were, possibly, just pi55ing against a wall

 

Shortly before a midweek League Cup tie in 1990/91 and McQueen was a co-commentator in the infancy of BSB.

 

0-1 Hearts.

 

Scott Crabbe got the goal in extra time.

 

Good times. 🤪

 

Best wishes to the man.

Edited by martoon
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John Findlay

I would like to know if dementia is linked to alcohol in anyway. These players of yesteryear were not slow in putting the bevvy away.

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I was sorry to learn when reading this that Bobby Charlton has also contracted it.

 

Very sad and headguards may well become a requirement in future.  That would spoil the game imo.  Bit like all the players having to wear face masks.  If it has to be though it has to be.

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franco2209
34 minutes ago, John Findlay said:

I would like to know if dementia is linked to alcohol in anyway. These players of yesteryear were not slow in putting the bevvy away.

Korsakoff dementia 👍

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NANOJAMBO
2 hours ago, Ray Gin said:

 

According to this the 3 grams difference was after soaking an old ball in water.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/4123437.stm

 

Heading a modern-day football is not significantly safer than an old-style leather ball... that doesn't make sense to me. The old balls were FAR heavier when wet than anything I saw in the 1970s onwards.

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henryheart

I was brought up heading leather balls. It was the laces that hurt as the balls themselves were quite light and not anywhere as bad as the dreaded Mitre Mould Master. The most painful thing to head was somebody else's head, and it wouldn't surprise me if this is how a lot of the health issues have developed.

 

Football has evolved and is nothing like the game I played very badly. I wouldn't last 5 minutes now playing as I did as every tackle I made would now be deemed dangerous. The game will continue to evolve and I suspect that as time outs for head injuries are introduced at more levels of the game the emphasis will change and heading will naturally phase out.  

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Sad news and thoughts with Gordon and his family. His playing days were before my time but by all accounts he was an absolute lion for Scotland, Leeds United and Man United. I remember him as a pundit on Scotsport back in the day and always found him quite good and generally complementary towards Hearts. The one moment I'll always associate with him though is his celebration of Faddy's goal in Paris while covering the game for Sky Sports. You could see how passionate he still was about his country. 

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Dusk_Till_Dawn
1 hour ago, NANOJAMBO said:

Heading a modern-day football is not significantly safer than an old-style leather ball... that doesn't make sense to me. The old balls were FAR heavier when wet than anything I saw in the 1970s onwards.


It’s more about the impact. Okay, one will make more of an impact but even so, it’s still a hefty blow to the brain

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Four faces

I've seen several instances in last couple of years where it looks as if younger  players are shirking heading the ball.This type of report will create fear in the players coming through.Won't stop many from drinking too much though.

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davemclaren
1 hour ago, Four faces said:

I've seen several instances in last couple of years where it looks as if younger  players are shirking heading the ball.This type of report will create fear in the players coming through.Won't stop many from drinking too much though.

Probably true. We tend to be selective about the risks mitigate. 

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Four faces
2 hours ago, davemclaren said:

Probably true. We tend to be selective about the risks mitigate. 

Yeah, doing away with heading won't impact the drinks industry😑. I'm not a purist, there's nothing wrong with enjoying a bevvy (even though i packed it in years ago) but like you say, these reports occasionally seem very specific.In my experience the vast majority of dementia victims i have known of in my life and there are, many have had no connection to impact damage. 

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Four faces
On 24/02/2021 at 18:59, Spellczech said:

My dad has the same. Never kicked a ball in anger.

You have my sympathy.It's a terrible thing.

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In the late seventies, my mate and I took the train down to Leeds to watch Leeds v. Spurs in a league game.

Spurs had a certain Ardiles and Villa playing. Big McQueen was away from Leeds by then, I think at Man U.

On the way back up home on the train, big Joe (Jordan) and big McQueen were on the train. They spotted our Leeds scarves and promptly sat down beside us and talked to us for a good hour or so, before going to their own seats.
They were on their way up to join the Scotland squad.  Big Gordon McQueen in particular was very talkative and came across as a really genuine decent guy. 
That header at Wembley just before ht (I was behind the goals) is the finest single experience of my football watching life !

 

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