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Captain America

Job interview Tips

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Captain America

As the thread title says. - good tips when going for a job interview.

 

I have been in my current role for nearly 14 years, enjoying my work but have been wanting a new challenge and recently been applying for promotions within my current employment

 

I have an interview coming up ( same employer but different office) and haven't had a job interview since I started this job way back in 2005. 

 

So looking for tips/ helpful advice.

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Shrekeo

Fistpumps always make a good impression.

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Victorian

Start every sentence with the word 'So...".        

 

Speak with the Australian Question Intonation.

 

People love all that shit.    Job's yours.

Edited by Victorian

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will-i-am-a-jambo

Do your homework on the job/role you are applying for, think about the positive things you can contribute to that role, think about your weaknesses and how you may overcome/rectify them. Think of some questions you might want to ask about the role.

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Silvery_Moon
48 minutes ago, Captain America said:

As the thread title says. - good tips when going for a job interview.

 

I have been in my current role for nearly 14 years, enjoying my work but have been wanting a new challenge and recently been applying for promotions within my current employment

 

I have an interview coming up ( same employer but different office) and haven't had a job interview since I started this job way back in 2005. 

 

So looking for tips/ helpful advice.

Think of positive examples of work you have done.

 

Use the 'STAR' approach to answer the questions. Situation, Task, Action, Result.

 

When describing what you did make sure to say 'I did this' as opposed to 'we did this'.

 

Truth is though people work in different ways and you can never be sure what they are looking for. In some situations they will have already decided who they want before the interview. However, give it your best shot and you will be fine.

 

Maintain good eye contact too 

 

Good luck.

Edited by Silvery_Moon

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Tynieman
1 hour ago, Captain America said:

As the thread title says. - good tips when going for a job interview.

 

I have been in my current role for nearly 14 years, enjoying my work but have been wanting a new challenge and recently been applying for promotions within my current employment

 

I have an interview coming up ( same employer but different office) and haven't had a job interview since I started this job way back in 2005. 

 

So looking for tips/ helpful advice.

 

The tip I was given by a senior manager in my work was to think of the 10 things you're most proud of achieving (both in work and outside).

 

This should cover most interview questions and it also allows you to fit your answers where appropriate.

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Bozi

All of the above is good but the best thing I can say is read the job specification, it will give you all you need to know. 

Think of examples of things that you have done/achieved within your role that are examples of the qualities required within the job specification. This way, no matter what they throw at you would will be able to showcase your understanding of the role and an example of when you have applied that in your current post. 

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milky_26

have you called your prospective new boss. when people are considered for transfers to my department one thing that goes in their favour is giving a quick call or visiting to discuss the job as it might not be what you want or you might not be right for it. It can save both the interviewers time and yours

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Samuel Camazzola

Watch the Trainspotting clip where Spud has his interview. That's how to nail it! 😄 

 

 

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Ricardo Shillyshally

Look the firm up on companies House if they are incorporated. Some good snippets of info in there

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Captain America
1 hour ago, Shrekeo said:

Fistpumps always make a good impression.

I got a 5 year old so my first pump game is on point.

 

 

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Captain America
53 minutes ago, will-i-am-a-jambo said:

Do your homework on the job/role you are applying for, think about the positive things you can contribute to that role, think about your weaknesses and how you may overcome/rectify them. Think of some questions you might want to ask about the role.

I have been spending bit of time finding out about the department and what they do as although it part of the same organisation it seems a lot different from my current role.

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Captain America
51 minutes ago, Silvery_Moon said:

Think of positive examples of work you have done.

 

Use the 'STAR' approach to answer the questions. Situation, Task, Action, Result.

 

When describing what you did make sure to say 'I did this' as opposed to 'we did this'.

 

Truth is though people work in different ways and you can never be sure what they are looking for. In some situations they will have already decided who they want before the interview. However, give it your best shot and you will be fine.

 

Maintain good eye contact too 

 

Good luck.

The using I instead of we is something I struggled with when writing applications/ competencies for roles as I have never been one to stand in the limelight so to speak even though I now have a leadership role within the teams I work in. I am slowly getting better at it.

 

👍

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Captain America
34 minutes ago, Tynieman said:

 

The tip I was given by a senior manager in my work was to think of the 10 things you're most proud of achieving (both in work and outside).

 

This should cover most interview questions and it also allows you to fit your answers where appropriate.

That's tip I never heard of before but makes sense. I'll get thinking on those.

 

Prob best leave out my football manager examples even though I am extremely proud of those.

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will-i-am-a-jambo
8 minutes ago, Captain America said:

I have been spending bit of time finding out about the department and what they do as although it part of the same organisation it seems a lot different from my current role.

 

Good luck with the interview!

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Captain America

Cheers to all who replied.

 

Definitely given lot to think about.

 

I have questions in mind to ask about role possible shift pattern etc.

 

I work in specialist department just now so have a lot examples can use, but just knowing which ones right I guess.

 

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PTBCAL
1 hour ago, Silvery_Moon said:

Think of positive examples of work you have done.

 

Use the 'STAR' approach to answer the questions. Situation, Task, Action, Result.

 

When describing what you did make sure to say 'I did this' as opposed to 'we did this'.

 

Truth is though people work in different ways and you can never be sure what they are looking for. In some situations they will have already decided who they want before the interview. However, give it your best shot and you will be fine.

 

Maintain good eye contact too 

 

Good luck.

 

That is good advice.

 

Also bring in life achievements into you selling yourself. Does not have to be about work environment,

.

They will ask.....tell us a time when you etc..... be fully prepared fir various scenarios 

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Paul Allen

Just be yourself mate:

 

A34CB68F-CE80-4327-977B-03C5A1DB625B.jpeg

Edited by Paul Allen

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LeftBack

I've found 'interviewing' myself can be good preperation... In the car, at the gym, out walking. Obviously in the car you can talk the other times it has to be in your head. I know it sounds daft but if you can think of questions likely to be asked and then have answer ready it can improve confidence. Similarly think of question you hope doesn't come up and prepare answer that should help nerves. But overall preparation is key, if you know you have prepared the best you can then there is nothing more you can do. 

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Craig_

Definitely try to visualise yourself doing the actual job and what that might entail. That should give you a good idea of the sort of questions you might want to ask.

 

Also, don't be afraid to mix up a combination of work, academic (if relevant) and personal experiences to give a more rounded account of yourself. Nothing worse than interviewing someone who comes across as a robot. Irrespective of their achievements, ultimately what an interviewer wants to know is whether they like the person and whether they'll be able to work with them on a daily basis. So keep it light, but don't be flippant (difficult balancing act, I know).

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CostaJambo
2 hours ago, milky_26 said:

have you called your prospective new boss. when people are considered for transfers to my department one thing that goes in their favour is giving a quick call or visiting to discuss the job as it might not be what you want or you might not be right for it. It can save both the interviewers time and yours

That is an excellent tip, particularly relevant as it is an internal opportunity in this case. 

 

A few i would add...

 

Write down a few points you definitely want to get across (not too many, say 4 or 5), memorise them and count them off as you say them, that way you won't forget and remember them two minutes after leaving the interview.

 

Be as natural as you can, easier said than done in interview conditions.

 

Might not work for everyone but I usually play my most inspiring favourite song really loudly a few times on the way to an interview to get myself feeling ultra positive (Eurythmics - Right by Your Side, dunno why, it just works for me).

 

Best of luck with it.

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FWJ
13 hours ago, Captain America said:

As the thread title says. - good tips when going for a job interview.

 

I have been in my current role for nearly 14 years, enjoying my work but have been wanting a new challenge and recently been applying for promotions within my current employment

 

I have an interview coming up ( same employer but different office) and haven't had a job interview since I started this job way back in 2005. 

 

So looking for tips/ helpful advice.

If it’s a part of town you don’t know do a recce first so you know where it is, where to park or what bus goes past etc.  (I spent 10 minutes trying to find the right door into a place once).  Give yourself plenty of time to get settled beforehand too.

Good luck!

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IronJambo

Make sure you cover the basics, it's amazing the amount of people that overlook them.

Eg: have a shave, polish your (black) shoes, button your jacket correctly and unbutton when you sit down. Write your questions down on a notepad and don't be scared to take it out, in fact DO take it out. You might not have any real questions, but make sure you make some up that by asking shows you have a real understanding (or at least a grasp) of the role you're after. 

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Homme

At the end, when they ask if there is anything else, use the opportunity to thank them for the invite to interview and stress how much you would like the position.

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i8hibsh

Dress up as a woman.

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Ribble

Look at the language used in the job spec and mirror it where possible, can be something as simple as you knowing a department as accounts but they have used finance. Shows attention to detail and saves the interviewer from mentally 'translating' terminology.

 

Avoid giving opinions, you may have a strong view on a way of working or a particular system being better than another but it's far better to show openness to evaluating things depending on the situation.

 

Avoid saying you did/done something, instead say you managed/organised/delivered (especially if as per point 1, the job spec says you will need to manage/organise/deliver etc)

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Marvin
14 hours ago, Shrekeo said:

Fistpumps always make a good impression.

 

I was going to say offer the interviewer a BJ. 

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Marvin

Do some homework on the company who will be doing the interview so that shows you have an interest on your job application.

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AlphonseCapone
16 hours ago, Silvery_Moon said:

Think of positive examples of work you have done.

 

Use the 'STAR' approach to answer the questions. Situation, Task, Action, Result.

 

When describing what you did make sure to say 'I did this' as opposed to 'we did this'.

 

Truth is though people work in different ways and you can never be sure what they are looking for. In some situations they will have already decided who they want before the interview. However, give it your best shot and you will be fine.

 

Maintain good eye contact too 

 

Good luck.

 

Add an extra R to STARR for reflection ie what went well that you'd use again, what didn't and how you learnt from it. 

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Samuel Camazzola
2 hours ago, Marvin said:

Do some homework on the company who will be doing the interview so that shows you have an interest on your job application.

It's an interview for the same company he already works for. Just a different office /department. 

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dougal

When they ask whether you have any questions, ask them if there was anything about your performance during the interview that has given them any concerns? Puts the ball in their court and you might get some much needed feedback.

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Silvery_Moon
1 hour ago, AlphonseCapone said:

 

Add an extra R to STARR for reflection ie what went well that you'd use again, what didn't and how you learnt from it. 

Good shout.

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Hector Riva

Mention at the beginning of the interview that you are a good friend of Uche. 

 

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Marvin
1 hour ago, Samuel Camazzola said:

It's an interview for the same company he already works for. Just a different office /department. 

 

Ah right. Wish him good luck then. 

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Mr Brightside
6 hours ago, dougal said:

When they ask whether you have any questions, ask them if there was anything about your performance during the interview that has given them any concerns? Puts the ball in their court and you might get some much needed feedback.

I don’t think that’s a good idea. As interviewer it feels awkward when you are asked this. 

If some does a reasonable interview but you know they aren’t the right person you end up saying everything was fine but not offering the person a job.

You are more likely to get honest and considered feedback at the end of the recruitment process.

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Mikey1874

Be yourself. 

 

Sometimes you can over prepare. More important to be able to relax (as much as possible) so you can listen carefully to the questions and give considered answers. 

 

For those interviewing it is what you say but more importantly how you are. Someone self assured but not arrogant or rushed is attractive. 

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jambos are go!

An interview can be stressful for the panel as well as the interviewee. Don't make it worse and try and relax. The first question is likely to be about your current job and be prepared properly. I did plenty of interviews when I was working and about half of the candidates stumbled on that curiously.  A bad start leaves you with a hill to climb. 

 

Try and find out what other candidates were asked but dont tell anyone the truth  what you were asked.Some interviewers use a restricted list of questions believe me.

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Captain America

Thanks to all for helpful advice. Interview is next week so got a lot reading to get through these tips.

 

My current boss done a mock interview with me today and picked up a few tips from that.

 

 

 

 

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Greenbank2

I have interviewed and hired many people around the world. If you want to "wow" the hiring manager, I'll offer you two things in addition to the many tips here.

 

1. be prepared to talk with energy and passion about one thing of which you are particularly proud, that is not work related (and please don't say the obvious - everyone is proud of their kids, getting a degree etc). I once interviewed a guy and all he wanted to talk about was his academic career. Almost dismissed him as a candidate until he inadvertently dropped that he captained the Scotland U21 rugby union squad on tour. But it can be anything. Running a marathon, or a mile, breaking 100 in a round of golf, reading war and peace - anything. It will lead to a meaningful conversation on what drives and motivates you.

 

2. When you are asked "any questions?" Ask the hiring manager "how would your staff describe your management style?" (I really hate being asked that!). It allows you and him/her to talk meaningfully about how work gets done in their department.

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superjack

The 1 thing that stands out for me when interviewing, the amount ofnpeiple who don't make am effort, ie turn up in jeans and t shirt, hair a mess and a pair of trainers. First impressions last. When someone comes in looking like a sack of shit, no matter how good they might be, they have no chance.

Research the job and the competencies, if you know the competencies you can pretty much have your answers sorted prior to the interview.

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Bigsmak

If its in the same company you already work for .. you should be able to find out the interview questions in advance. Do that - 

 

STAR - as mentioned above.  Have 10 examples ready to go that you can talk about. 

 

 

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AlphonseCapone
12 hours ago, Mr Brightside said:

I don’t think that’s a good idea. As interviewer it feels awkward when you are asked this. 

If some does a reasonable interview but you know they aren’t the right person you end up saying everything was fine but not offering the person a job.

You are more likely to get honest and considered feedback at the end of the recruitment process.

 

I think I agree with this. I know in my area the interview isn't marked until the candidate leaves, the interview is essentially writing everything they say down. Sure there will likely be a feeling one way or another but nothing that could be fed back. But I know our interviews are likely much more formal and rigid than others. 

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Bridge of Djoum

 

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The Wrinkly Ninja
On 14/03/2019 at 21:04, Captain America said:

I have been spending bit of time finding out about the department and what they do as although it part of the same organisation it seems a lot different from my current role.

 

But actually find out who the interview panel is going to be, who your immediate line manager will be and phone/email them to ask for a brief informal chat to discuss the role. When you are there ask them about the role, their expectations of the role, how the role will change, how the role came about and what their expectations are for a candidate. Ask them about the interview day - how long will the interview be - who else is on the panel, how many days of interviewing they are doing, how many candidates there are. Get confirmation of salary and benefits. They may not answer some of these but basically you are putting across to them that you are someone who is interested, who is enthusiastic, that has attention to detail, who does their research and who is well prepared.

 

It's difficult to apply for a job and go through an interview process without feeling uncomfortable and that you are a bit of a tit. If you don't though - some other tit will get the job!!

 

 

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fabienleclerq

As silvery moon said prepare for the star type questions. Think of what the role entails and write down examples of you doing similar in your current or previous jobs.

 

For example if the role is health and safety based think of an example of you following a Procedure calmly and methodically etc. Try have examples that would answer a couple of questions.

 

Question to ask them would be, if you are successful in your application how will your next 3 months look?

 

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Captain America

Had the interview today.

 

Think it went well, main woman who was interviewing me said they were doing a different format from interviews they had previously done and asked me 9 questions and I had to give reply within 2 minutes to provide examples of how I meet the criteria. 

 

I came out of the interview not feeling like I had messed up or should have said something else so even if I don't get job I feel good about how I performed.

 

Again, thanks to everyone who took the time to give me tips/pointers, funny posts and pictures of Spud.

 

😀

 

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Marvin
On 15/03/2019 at 10:02, i8hibsh said:

Dress up as a woman.

 

In today's equality laws could be worth saying you (the interviewee) are gay. 

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i8hibsh
3 minutes ago, Marvin said:

 

In today's equality laws could be worth saying you (the interviewee) are gay. 

 

 

Would defo put you to the front of the queue.

 

In all seriousness, this probably deserves it’s own thread instead of hijacking the OP but I need to go on my soapbox.

 

It seems like every company now proudly advertises themselves as being an ‘equal opportunities’ employer.  This of course sounds fantastic and fair but they then follow it up with something like “We aim to recruit 60% more women by 2021” or “We aim to have 15% more people of colour in the boardroom by 2025” and so on and so on.  I implore people to think about what this is actually saying.

 

By saying you are going to recruit 60% more women, that is without the slightest shadow of doubt saying that somewhere along the road a woman is going to be favoured for a role for no other reason than she is a female.  There is absolutely no other way to construe this.  To say you want 60% more women employed means you are going to make a concerted effort to employ less men and more women.  This is ‘equal’ in the year 2019 and there is absolutely NOTHING fair about it.

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Marvin
3 minutes ago, i8hibsh said:

 

 

Would defo put you to the front of the queue.

 

In all seriousness, this probably deserves it’s own thread instead of hijacking the OP but I need to go on my soapbox.

 

It seems like every company now proudly advertises themselves as being an ‘equal opportunities’ employer.  This of course sounds fantastic and fair but they then follow it up with something like “We aim to recruit 60% more women by 2021” or “We aim to have 15% more people of colour in the boardroom by 2025” and so on and so on.  I implore people to think about what this is actually saying

 

If you have the slightest of disabilities or are indeed gay. The DWP will guarantee you an interview ;)

 

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Mollo

Go over the job spec with a set of highlighters:

 

what you can do

what you know but don’t have experience on

what you don’t know

etc

 

it helps you fomulate a preparation for being asked about them and makes sure you don’t miss something then face a question on it!

 

Also no matter how confident you may be - read up on body language, even if you think you already know it. It’s amazing what can make a difference on that day 👍🏻

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