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Place names pronunciation

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Thunderstruck
Posted (edited)

Whiskies associated with places always causes arguments. They are or are from Gaelic where accent/stress might not be on the first syllable. 

 

Here are some from Islay:-

Laphroaig - LaffROYG

Bowmore - BowMORE

Kilchoman - KilCHOman (the ‘ch’ as in Loch)

Bruichladdich - Brooch-LADDIE (the ‘ch’ as in Loch)

Caol Ila - Cool-EELA

Bunnahabhain - BunnaHAVN

 

Edited by Thunderstruck

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Joey J J Jr Shabadoo
19 hours ago, Maroon Sailor said:

Tucson

Too-son. 

 

Mojave. 

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Morgan
18 minutes ago, Locky said:

Butt clutch is a personal favourite.

 

F0C68A2D-F4F7-451D-A241-6A4858269E0E.jpeg

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Joey J J Jr Shabadoo
1 hour ago, Morgan said:

Buck lee uch?

 

:wink: 

 

 

:lol:

 It's like the Duke never existed. 

An English couple once asked me for directions to Penny-cue-ick. 

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Morgan
13 minutes ago, Thunderstruck said:

Whiskies associated with places always causes arguments. They are or are from Gaelic where accent/stress might not be on the first syllable. 

 

Here are some from Islay:-

Laphroaig - LaffROYG

Bowmore - BowMORE

Kilchoman - KilCHOman (the ‘ch’ as in Loch)

Bruichladdich - Brooch-LADDIE (the ‘ch’ as in Loch)

Caol Ila - Cool-EELA

Bunnahabhain - BunnaHAVN

 

These are interesting.

 

Apart from the first two on your list, I didn’t know how to pronounce them. ?

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ri Alban
25 minutes ago, Thunderstruck said:

Whiskies associated with places always causes arguments. They are or are from Gaelic where accent/stress might not be on the first syllable. 

 

Here are some from Islay:-

Laphroaig - LaffROYG

Bowmore - BowMORE

Kilchoman - KilCHOman (the ‘ch’ as in Loch)

Bruichladdich - Brooch-LADDIE (the ‘ch’ as in Loch)

Caol Ila - Cool-EELA

Bunnahabhain - BunnaHAVN

 

Caol. Used to annoy my boy Kyle with this. :D

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Locky
29 minutes ago, Morgan said:

 

F0C68A2D-F4F7-451D-A241-6A4858269E0E.jpeg

 

 

bill-cosby-smiling.jpg

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Maple Leaf
1 hour ago, Tazio said:

Another Edinburgh one that's been niggling at me since my morning bus started having stop announcements. 

 

Drumsheugh.

 

I always said and heard people say Drumshooch with the ch the same as loch. Now it seems to be Drumshoo. 

 

Sacrilege. :shockio:

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Maroon Sailor

Gloucester = Gloster

 

Worcester = Wooster

 

Sunderland = Sunlin

 

Torquay = Tor-key

 

Brighton = Brytin

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King prawn
2 hours ago, Maroon Sailor said:

Gloucester = Gloster

 

Worcester = Wooster

 

Sunderland = Sunlin

 

Torquay = Tor-key

 

Brighton = Brytin

As a native of Worcester it’s not Wooster ;) 

Wustah is closer. 

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Maroon Sailor
Just now, King prawn said:

As a native of Worcester it’s not Wooster ;) 

Wustah is closer. 

 

roger

 

Local knowledge is key !

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King prawn
Just now, Maroon Sailor said:

 

roger

 

Local knowledge is key !

Absolutely! I was ridiculed by the locals here in Norfolk when I moved here and tried to pronounce some of the places here.

 

Costessey is apparently “Cossy” but I still think that’s nonsense 

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Maroon Sailor
22 minutes ago, King prawn said:

Absolutely! I was ridiculed by the locals here in Norfolk when I moved here and tried to pronounce some of the places here.

 

Costessey is apparently “Cossy” but I still think that’s nonsense 

 

I'm the same when I've been down South - they have a wee laugh before correcting me

 

Case in point as I posted earlier in the thread Teignmouth

 

HTF do they get Tinmith out of that ?!

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graygo

Often passed the sign for the Ae Forest in Dumfries and wondered how it was pronounced.

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Lemongrab
3 hours ago, graygo said:

Often passed the sign for the Ae Forest in Dumfries and wondered how it was pronounced.

I think the e is silent. :D 

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Lemongrab

Cadiz Street in Leith.  I'd pronounce it ka diz; likewise for the Spanish city.  I've heard people call it what sounds like Kayda Street.

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I P Knightley
12 hours ago, Maroon Sailor said:

Gloucester = Gloster

 

Worcester = Wooster

 

Sunderland = Sunlin

 

Torquay = Tor-key

 

Brighton = Brytin

I'm not buying your Sunderland.

 

Couple of good mates are native Mackems and and they give it the full three syllables: Soon-duh-land.

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Tommy Brown
2 hours ago, Lemongrab said:

Cadiz Street in Leith.  I'd pronounce it ka diz; likewise for the Spanish city.  I've heard people call it what sounds like Kayda Street.

 

But should it be kad-ith? not ka-deez 

 

Not a place name, but why does the Rangers captain Tavernier get Tav-ern-eer, surly it is Tav-erny-A

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Smithee
19 hours ago, Tazio said:

Another Edinburgh one that's been niggling at me since my morning bus started having stop announcements. 

 

Drumsheugh.

 

I always said and heard people say Drumshooch with the ch the same as loch. Now it seems to be Drumshoo. 

Worked there in my teens, it's always been Drumshyooch to me.

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Smithee
2 hours ago, Tommy Brown said:

 

But should it be kad-ith? not ka-deez 

 

Not a place name, but why does the Rangers captain Tavernier get Tav-ern-eer, surly it is Tav-erny-A

I think it's an anglicisation of a French word, in the same way we say cavalier. 

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Jambos_1874
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Tommy Brown said:

 

But should it be kad-ith? not ka-deez 

 

Not a place name, but why does the Rangers captain Tavernier get Tav-ern-eer, surly it is Tav-erny-A

 

He gets even more than a dodgy pronounciation at Easter Road.

Edited by Jambos_1874

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martoon

I remember one of the Wimbledon tennis commentators said umpire John Frame came from "the quaintly named Penny-quick". 

 

Was once asked for directions to "ork hard brae" and heard a weegie newsreader describe a crime in "more a din". 

 

Slightly off topic but I've heard some refer to Stockbridge as Stoke-areeeee?

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martoon

Edinburra for me. Otherwise it would be spelled Edinbrough as in Middlesbrough. 

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Chester™
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Smithee said:

Worked there in my teens, it's always been Drumshyooch to me.

 

Dont know if its an age thing? I'm just a bit under 40 and its always been Drum-shoo to me (though my parents and grandparents called it that as well). I've never heard it called anything else until it was mentioned in this thread.

 

EDIT - on place names, I always find it amusing the variations of 'Dalziel'.

Edited by Chester™

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Morgan
4 minutes ago, Chester™ said:

 

Dont know if its an age thing? I'm just a bit under 40 and its always been Drum-shoo to me (though my parents and grandparents called it that as well). I've never heard it called anything else until it was mentioned in this thread.

 

EDIT - on place names, I always find it amusing the variations of 'Dalziel'.

I would say Dee Ell.

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Chester™
Just now, Morgan said:

I would say Dee Ell.

 

Which is correct.

 

I've heard - Dal-zee-ell, Dal-zeel, Dee-zeel, Dee-Zee-Ell, Dalz-ell, (and a couple of others). :lol:

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Tazio
6 minutes ago, Chester™ said:

Dont know if its an age thing? I'm just a bit under 40 and its always been Drum-shoo to me (though my parents and grandparents called it that as well). I've never heard it called anything else until it was mentioned in this thread.

 

 

Maybe it's a class thing? Are you posh? 

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Bridge of Djoum
On 07/03/2019 at 15:53, Mr Sifter said:

Had a conversation with a colleague only yesterday, in which he hadn’t heard of either Nitten or Gorebrig. Had to explain I was talking about Newtongrange and Gorebridge...the guy was from Leith ffs, how did he no ken where I was talkin aboot? ?

TBF I'm, from Leith/Lochend and I've never heard of ''Nitten''. No idea what or where it was.

 

Why can't those out of town peasants talk good?

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Tazio
37 minutes ago, martoon said:

Slightly off topic but I've heard some refer to Stockbridge as Stoke-areeeee?

 

Of course.

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Bridge of Djoum
On 07/03/2019 at 17:05, Morgan said:

My fat bloater of a sister-in-law:

 

(Who was born in Edinburgh, btw)

 

Princess Street.

 

Prin feckin CESS.

 

I ask you.  :facepalm:

 

She writes it too.

 

Honestly, she does. :vrface:

Got any pics...:whistling:

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Bridge of Djoum
On 08/03/2019 at 02:26, Maroon Sailor said:

Kirkcaldy

 

How many times do we hear Kirk Cal Day from south of the border ?

 

Fal-mouth or Fall-mouth or Fal-mith or Fall-mith

Falmith. 

 

Waymith

 

GUZZ.

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Bridge of Djoum
20 hours ago, Morgan said:

Buck lee uch?

 

:wink: 

 

 

I called it Buck Lay Uck for years.

 

I also thought the trains went over the arches of the Forth Bridge.

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Chester™
8 minutes ago, Tazio said:

 

Maybe it's a class thing? Are you posh? 

 

No.

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superjack

I always find it funny people trying to pronounce village names in Lewis. Callinish for example, to me it is straight forward, it ends in nish. However, the amount of people who pronounce it as neesh. 

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Mr Sifter
8 minutes ago, Bridge of Djoum said:

TBF I'm, from Leith/Lochend and I've never heard of ''Nitten''. No idea what or where it was.

 

Why can't those out of town peasants talk good?

 

Mmmm you’ve got me wondering now if it’s maybe just a ‘Nitten’ thing...or at best, a south of Edinburgh thing? I’m born in Clermiston but been up the Southside since about the age of 5. Just always used the words Nitten and Gorebrig, as has all my peers. 

 

Think you might have to take a straw poll Djoum...spend the day walking around Leith shouting ‘NITTEN’ and see if anyone knows what yer on aboot ?

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Bridge of Djoum
Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Mr Sifter said:

 

Mmmm you’ve got me wondering now if it’s maybe just a ‘Nitten’ thing...or at best, a south of Edinburgh thing? I’m born in Clermiston but been up the Southside since about the age of 5. Just always used the words Nitten and Gorebrig, as has all my peers. 

 

Think you might have to take a straw poll Djoum...spend the day walking around Leith shouting ‘NITTEN’ and see if anyone knows what yer on aboot ?

I'd probably have a bunch of elderly ladies asking me my favorite wool and cross stitch. That is of course before the inevitable interruption of my day out by the local constabulary.

 

I'd heard of Goerbrig, but I'd always pronounced it Goerbridge.

Edited by Bridge of Djoum

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Morgan
18 minutes ago, Bridge of Djoum said:

Got any pics...:whistling:

Have you eaten yet?

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Morgan
58 minutes ago, martoon said:

 

 

Slightly off topic but I've heard some refer to Stockbridge as Stoke-areeeee?

Aye, that’s a popular one. We used to drink there a lot and always arranged to meet folk in ‘good old Stockaree’.

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Morgan
26 minutes ago, Bridge of Djoum said:

Got any pics...:whistling:

But, since it’s you...

 

 

683F04F2-3742-48E2-B408-463C6A434EA6.jpeg

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Bridge of Djoum
7 minutes ago, Morgan said:

Have you eaten yet?

:rofl:

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Maple Leaf
15 minutes ago, Mr Sifter said:

 

Mmmm you’ve got me wondering now if it’s maybe just a ‘Nitten’ thing...or at best, a south of Edinburgh thing? I’m born in Clermiston but been up the Southside since about the age of 5. Just always used the words Nitten and Gorebrig, as has all my peers. 

 

Think you might have to take a straw poll Djoum...spend the day walking around Leith shouting ‘NITTEN’ and see if anyone knows what yer on aboot ?

 

I'm a Gilmerton lad, and it was the same for me.

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Bridge of Djoum
2 minutes ago, Morgan said:

But, since it’s you...

 

 

683F04F2-3742-48E2-B408-463C6A434EA6.jpeg

:levein_interesting:

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Morgan
2 minutes ago, Bridge of Djoum said:

:levein_interesting:

She also doubles as a roundabout, and has worked at Maybury amongst other places.

 

 

F38337F0-5FC7-4373-9A70-AE0C3FAB5BF9.jpeg

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A Boy Named Crow
On 08/03/2019 at 07:54, Maple Leaf said:

 

Or Strathavon.

Do you mean Strathaven? That’s where I’m from. Curious thing about Strathaven, the name apparently comes from two different dialects. “Strath” from the fact that it is across the river Avon, which is named from some other dialect for being across a valley. So in effect the town is balked Acrossacross. None of this explains why it’s Strathaven and not Strathavon, as you’d expect...or why it’s pronounced Straven!

 

of course, if you didn’t actually mean Strathaven, then I’ve just bored everyone for no good reason...not the first time, I’m sure it won’t be the last!

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Maple Leaf
7 minutes ago, A Boy Named Crow said:

Do you mean Strathaven? That’s where I’m from. Curious thing about Strathaven, the name apparently comes from two different dialects. “Strath” from the fact that it is across the river Avon, which is named from some other dialect for being across a valley. So in effect the town is balked Acrossacross. None of this explains why it’s Strathaven and not Strathavon, as you’d expect...or why it’s pronounced Straven!

 

of course, if you didn’t actually mean Strathaven, then I’ve just bored everyone for no good reason...not the first time, I’m sure it won’t be the last!

 

Thanks.  My spelling errer.  :wink:

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Maroon Sailor
4 hours ago, I P Knightley said:

I'm not buying your Sunderland.

 

Couple of good mates are native Mackems and and they give it the full three syllables: Soon-duh-land.

 

More what the fans sound like. Much like Sellick

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Smithee
1 hour ago, Chester™ said:

 

Dont know if its an age thing? I'm just a bit under 40 and its always been Drum-shoo to me (though my parents and grandparents called it that as well). I've never heard it called anything else until it was mentioned in this thread.

 

EDIT - on place names, I always find it amusing the variations of 'Dalziel'.

 

I'm mid 40s but it's not my stomping ground to be fair. I worked at the inland revenue beside a good couple of hundred people, never heard it called anything other than Drumshyooch, but I'd be inclined to go with the older generations who know the area. 

 

53 minutes ago, Mr Sifter said:

 

Mmmm you’ve got me wondering now if it’s maybe just a ‘Nitten’ thing...or at best, a south of Edinburgh thing? I’m born in Clermiston but been up the Southside since about the age of 5. Just always used the words Nitten and Gorebrig, as has all my peers. 

 

Think you might have to take a straw poll Djoum...spend the day walking around Leith shouting ‘NITTEN’ and see if anyone knows what yer on aboot ?

 

I'm a dalkeither  (or close enough), it's always been Nitten and Gorebrig to me.

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Bridge of Djoum
2 hours ago, Smithee said:

I think it's an anglicisation of a French word, in the same way we say cavalier. 

Perfectly outlines your posting style...

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redtipsjambo

Cumbernauld or Cumbernod

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Smithee
20 minutes ago, Bridge of Djoum said:

Perfectly outlines your posting style...

I'm choosing to take that the nice way!

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