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Jambo-Jimbo
6 hours ago, The Frenchman Returns said:

I think the picture comes from here

http://libraryblogs.is.ed.ac.uk/diu/2013/09/18/baldwin-brown-images-of-old-edinburgh-2/

unsure if that helps

 

5 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

Love stuff like this, so someone in that photo could possibly be a relative of yours, hopefully we can dig out some more information on it😊

 

You and me both, I love this stuff as well, especially when a photo crops up from time to time where relatives of mine once stayed and yes one or more of the people in this photo could very well be related to me, but even if there isn't a relative in the photo the very fact that I'm looking at a place/building which my ancestors looked at as well and what they saw is near enough exactly what I'm looking at as well and for me imo that bridges the generations.

 

Been doing a bit of digging on Baldwin Brown and the only one I can find is a Gerard Baldwin Brown who was a Professor of Fine Art at Edinburgh University, he was born in London in 1849 and in 1880 took up a role at Edinburgh University which he held until he retired in 1930, he died in 1932 at the age of 83.

These glass plate negatives are held by Edinburgh University so that ties in with (Gerard) Baldwin Brown, glass plates were in use from the 1880's through to the 1920's and I wonder if the old guy in the photo's is Baldwin Brown himself, if so then I'd put his age in the photo's as being in his 60's or 70's, meaning that the photo's probably date from around the Edwardian era to George V reign, which ties in with the clothes of the women in the Bakehouse Close photo.

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luckyBatistuta
8 minutes ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

 

You and me both, I love this stuff as well, especially when a photo crops up from time to time where relatives of mine once stayed and yes one or more of the people in this photo could very well be related to me, but even if there isn't a relative in the photo the very fact that I'm looking at a place/building which my ancestors looked at as well and what they saw is near enough exactly what I'm looking at as well and for me imo that bridges the generations.

 

Been doing a bit of digging on Baldwin Brown and the only one I can find is a Gerard Baldwin Brown who was a Professor of Fine Art at Edinburgh University, he was born in London in 1849 and in 1880 took up a role at Edinburgh University which he held until he retired in 1930, he died in 1932 at the age of 83.

These glass plate negatives are held by Edinburgh University so that ties in with (Gerard) Baldwin Brown, glass plates were in use from the 1880's through to the 1920's and I wonder if the old guy in the photo's is Baldwin Brown himself, if so then I'd put his age in the photo's as being in his 60's or 70's, meaning that the photo's probably date from around the Edwardian era to George V reign, which ties in with the clothes of the women in the Bakehouse Close photo.

 

Think you are right that it’s him in those images

 

 

E54A9527-7993-48FD-B0A2-679009CBFFA6.jpeg

E70E5CC8-5800-4F21-A736-23BE5F7F20FD.jpeg

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luckyBatistuta
16 minutes ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

 

You and me both, I love this stuff as well, especially when a photo crops up from time to time where relatives of mine once stayed and yes one or more of the people in this photo could very well be related to me, but even if there isn't a relative in the photo the very fact that I'm looking at a place/building which my ancestors looked at as well and what they saw is near enough exactly what I'm looking at as well and for me imo that bridges the generations.

 

Been doing a bit of digging on Baldwin Brown and the only one I can find is a Gerard Baldwin Brown who was a Professor of Fine Art at Edinburgh University, he was born in London in 1849 and in 1880 took up a role at Edinburgh University which he held until he retired in 1930, he died in 1932 at the age of 83.

These glass plate negatives are held by Edinburgh University so that ties in with (Gerard) Baldwin Brown, glass plates were in use from the 1880's through to the 1920's and I wonder if the old guy in the photo's is Baldwin Brown himself, if so then I'd put his age in the photo's as being in his 60's or 70's, meaning that the photo's probably date from around the Edwardian era to George V reign, which ties in with the clothes of the women in the Bakehouse Close photo.

 

He lived in 3 Grosvenor Street, before moving to 50 George Square, which would fit in with this photograph I think. This looks like it  is taken just off George Square looking towards the Meadows to me.

 

 

3D2FA728-944D-4B9E-AA70-BD417A1F698C.jpeg

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luckyBatistuta

Blackford Arch and Blackford Pond

FE438C11-50A2-4776-93FF-7705762A1014.jpeg

E57A5048-C9C1-49C8-8174-6E4F8645DAD2.jpeg

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Lemongrab
8 hours ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Would you happen to have a date for when this photo was taken by any chance?

The hats & clothing of the two women look like Edwardian so maybe about the early 1900's, which if that were the case would be a decade out from when some of my lot lived here.

 

One of my Great Grandmothers & my Great Great Grandmother lived at 2 Bakehouse Close in the 1881 Census & at 6 Bakehouse Close in the 1891 Census, but moved sometime in the 1890's as they were living in Malloch's Close by 1901.

 

 

 

In one of the other photos in the link The Frenchman posted above, is a photo of a P Smith Bakers shop, which was at 277 Canongate.  I've seen this photo dated as 'around 1890' on a facebook page.

Now, that bakers shop, owned by a Patrick Smith, first appears in The Scottish Post Office Directory in 1894-95 (and is still there when those records end in 1911-12). So if the photos in the collection were all taken around that time, it is possible that your ancestors might still have been at Bakehouse Close when the photo was taken.

 

Have you thought about researching your family tree? Birth, Death and Marriage certificates might give you an  address in the period between 1891 and 1901.

 

 

psmith.jpg

p-smith2.jpg

 

 

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luckyBatistuta
Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

 

In one of the other photos in the link The Frenchman posted above, is a photo of a P Smith Bakers shop, which was at 277 Canongate.  I've seen this photo dated as 'around 1890' on a facebook page.

Now, that bakers shop, owned by a Patrick Smith, first appears in The Scottish Post Office Directory in 1894-95 (and is still there when those records end in 1911-12). So if the photos in the collection were all taken around that time, it is possible that your ancestors might still have been at Bakehouse Close when the photo was taken.

 

Have you thought about researching your family tree? Birth, Death and Marriage certificates might give you an  address in the period between 1891 and 1901.

 

 

psmith.jpg

p-smith2.jpg

 

 

 

There is a whole floor missing?

 

Wedgewood restaurant is 267 Canongate?

Edited by luckyBatistuta

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graygo
15 minutes ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

There is a whole floor missing?

 

Wedgewood restaurant is 267 Canongate?

 

 

MV5BNTAzMDI5MzgtMGNkMC00MzllLWJhNjctNjA1NmViNGUxMzYxXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTQxNzMzNDI@._V1_UX182_CR0,0,182,268_AL_.jpg

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Lemongrab
3 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

There is a whole floor missing?

 

Wedgewood restaurant is 267 Canongate?

It was redeveloped in the 1950s, it must have lost the floor then as well as the opening with the stairs to the left of the shop. The building to the left, which is now The Edinburgh School of English, is 271 Canongate, but the next building along, at the opposite corner of Cranston Street is 297.  At the other end of that block, the buildings either side of New street are Nos 231 and 246, so the whole block must have been renumbered when the rest of it was built.

(https://ewh.org.uk/iconic-buildings-and-monuments/moroccos-land/

 

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luckyBatistuta

_p

7 hours ago, graygo said:

 

 

MV5BNTAzMDI5MzgtMGNkMC00MzllLWJhNjctNjA1NmViNGUxMzYxXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTQxNzMzNDI@._V1_UX182_CR0,0,182,268_AL_.jpg

 

I definitely crossed over somewhere, woke up at 4.55am on the couch with my iPad now on the floor. Sunstroke🤔🙄  

3 hours ago, Lemongrab said:

It was redeveloped in the 1950s, it must have lost the floor then as well as the opening with the stairs to the left of the shop. The building to the left, which is now The Edinburgh School of English, is 271 Canongate, but the next building along, at the opposite corner of Cranston Street is 297.  At the other end of that block, the buildings either side of New street are Nos 231 and 246, so the whole block must have been renumbered when the rest of it was built.

(https://ewh.org.uk/iconic-buildings-and-monuments/moroccos-land/

 

 

It’s a weird one and I still don’t get it. The windows are a different size and rebuilt minus one floor out 🤷🏼‍♂️

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Jambo-Jimbo
8 hours ago, Lemongrab said:

 

In one of the other photos in the link The Frenchman posted above, is a photo of a P Smith Bakers shop, which was at 277 Canongate.  I've seen this photo dated as 'around 1890' on a facebook page.

Now, that bakers shop, owned by a Patrick Smith, first appears in The Scottish Post Office Directory in 1894-95 (and is still there when those records end in 1911-12). So if the photos in the collection were all taken around that time, it is possible that your ancestors might still have been at Bakehouse Close when the photo was taken.

 

Have you thought about researching your family tree? Birth, Death and Marriage certificates might give you an  address in the period between 1891 and 1901.

 

 

 

Been doing that for the last 20 years now, and as it happens I can narrow the time frame down, had forgotten that I had this more detailed info namely the valuation roll info until I looked at the family in more detail via my records, as you can appreciate it's difficult to remember everything about every family group off the top of my head.

 

1881 - Census they are living at 2 Bakehouse Close.

1891 - Census they are living at 6 Bakehouse Close.

1895 - Valuation Roll they are still at 6 Bakehouse Close.

Dec 1896 - Daughter (my Great Grandmother) marries but address is given as 22 St. John Street, she marries a guy who lived over the road at Dunbar's Close.

Nov 1897 - Daughter has first child at 146 Canongate which is Bakehouse Close, probably number 6 but I can't confirm that.

June 1899 - Husband of my GG Grandmother & step father of my Great Grandmother dies at 2 Malloch's Close.

 

So it looks very much like they were still at Bakehouse Close in November 1897 and probably moved to Malloch's Close between that date and June 1899, thus meaning that it is very possible that my ancestors could very easily have been still living at Bakehouse Close at around the time of this photo.

 

Edinburgh University may know the exact date this photo was taken, so it might be useful for me to email them and ask.

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luckyBatistuta
39 minutes ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Been doing that for the last 20 years now, and as it happens I can narrow the time frame down, had forgotten that I had this more detailed info namely the valuation roll info until I looked at the family in more detail via my records, as you can appreciate it's difficult to remember everything about every family group off the top of my head.

 

1881 - Census they are living at 2 Bakehouse Close.

1891 - Census they are living at 6 Bakehouse Close.

1895 - Valuation Roll they are still at 6 Bakehouse Close.

Dec 1896 - Daughter (my Great Grandmother) marries but address is given as 22 St. John Street, she marries a guy who lived over the road at Dunbar's Close.

Nov 1897 - Daughter has first child at 146 Canongate which is Bakehouse Close, probably number 6 but I can't confirm that.

June 1899 - Husband of my GG Grandmother & step father of my Great Grandmother dies at 2 Malloch's Close.

 

So it looks very much like they were still at Bakehouse Close in November 1897 and probably moved to Malloch's Close between that date and June 1899, thus meaning that it is very possible that my ancestors could very easily have been still living at Bakehouse Close at around the time of this photo.

 

Edinburgh University may know the exact date this photo was taken, so it might be useful for me to email them and ask.

 

You should maybe try and get in touch with the lady that I’ve highlighted below...

 

THE year is 1846. In a slum house at the bottom of the Royal Mile, a spirit seller is slowly dying from cholera.

Once a proud merchant plying his trade from an Edinburgh shop, he is now bed-ridden and weak from the disease - continuously vomiting due to the unclean water he has been drinking for years. 

 

Outside his small flat in the Canongate, there are open drains, filth and rubbish on the street where bare-footed children are playing. Lines of washing hung out to dry in the back closes are starting to turn grimy again thanks to the smoke and pollution that chokes the city. 

 

His shop has been closed for weeks, leaving his family poor and hungry as there is no money being earned. Their landlord, a powerful town elder and councillor, has just taken most of their savings as rent for their tiny flat. 

 

As he lies on the bed in agony, his doting daughter is trying to play down her own horrific condition as she tends to his illness. Since he is so weak, he hasn't noticed her cough getting worse or realised that she too is getting weaker - slowly succumbing to a dreadful wasting disease that has already claimed the lives of thousands across the city. It is the first sign of consumption, or tuberculosis. She will be dead in less than a month, following the same fate as her older sister who perished from fever two years beforehand. 

For the merchant, 54-year-old William Cameron, time is smiling more favourably on him than on his 19-year-old daughter. It will be another three months before he finally perishes in agony from his illness. 

The family, of course, are far from unique. Many hundreds of 19th century citizens of Edinburgh suffered the same fate in slum houses, incubating killer diseases such as cholera and consumption. 

But the reason William Cameron's name and his fate - and that of his family - is known to us is thanks to the work of Sandra Marwick, Edinburgh City Museum's learning and access manager. She has spent ten years researching the history of just one of Edinburgh's historic closes, Bakehouse Close, and those who lived there. The 500-year history of the complex of ancient buildings, now home to the Museum of Edinburgh, is almost the history of the city itself - from nobility and wealth to violence, death and disease. 

 
 

Three centuries before William Cameron met his miserable end in what was then a slum, the newly-built Bakehouse Close was home to John Aitchison - one of the leading goldsmiths of the time and the man in charge of Mary, Queen of Scot's royal mint in Edinburgh, and believed to be the second owner of the buildings. 

The squalor, poverty and disease of industrial era Edinburgh was a world away from the affluence of 16th century Canongate. 

IN 1570, Aitchison was a leading local figure and wealthy merchant. During his career as a baillie, or council enforcer, he was responsible for ridding the Canongate of a wave of "harlots" who had set up shop in the area and were trying to sell their wares to their well-off neighbours. 

After months of work, Aitchison and his fellow baillies finally forced the whores out of their homes, and the streets at the foot of the Royal Mile became an up-market area that soon attracted well-to-do businessmen and even nobles to its buildings - with dukes, duchesses and earls renting residences in the close over the 17th and 18th centuries. 

 
 

But as early as the mid-1600s, the class of clientele was already taking a dip. A man called Patrick Hart owned a property next to Acheson House, part of Bakehouse Close, at this time. A trader by profession, he was responsible for breaching the peace in the neighbourhood on a number of occasions and even ended up being imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle after one scuffle.

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Radio Ga Ga

Tollcross 1970’s

53AA06F3-D5E6-4AE5-9C28-8E60A134FDA8.jpeg

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luckyBatistuta
46 minutes ago, Jambo-Jimbo said:

 

Been doing that for the last 20 years now, and as it happens I can narrow the time frame down, had forgotten that I had this more detailed info namely the valuation roll info until I looked at the family in more detail via my records, as you can appreciate it's difficult to remember everything about every family group off the top of my head.

 

1881 - Census they are living at 2 Bakehouse Close.

1891 - Census they are living at 6 Bakehouse Close.

1895 - Valuation Roll they are still at 6 Bakehouse Close.

Dec 1896 - Daughter (my Great Grandmother) marries but address is given as 22 St. John Street, she marries a guy who lived over the road at Dunbar's Close.

Nov 1897 - Daughter has first child at 146 Canongate which is Bakehouse Close, probably number 6 but I can't confirm that.

June 1899 - Husband of my GG Grandmother & step father of my Great Grandmother dies at 2 Malloch's Close.

 

So it looks very much like they were still at Bakehouse Close in November 1897 and probably moved to Malloch's Close between that date and June 1899, thus meaning that it is very possible that my ancestors could very easily have been still living at Bakehouse Close at around the time of this photo.

 

Edinburgh University may know the exact date this photo was taken, so it might be useful for me to email them and ask.

 

No idea of dates?

 

 

DAEDD5F0-7351-44D7-9280-87C0A464B968.jpeg

CFAB25B7-C25E-4270-8F65-B285FBF6DD71.jpeg

163C1770-0C18-4AF7-9E74-AD1C469B6AF9.jpeg

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ArcticJambo
11 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

He lived in 3 Grosvenor Street, before moving to 50 George Square, which would fit in with this photograph I think. This looks like it  is taken just off George Square looking towards the Meadows to me.

 

 

3D2FA728-944D-4B9E-AA70-BD417A1F698C.jpeg

Very fair assumption.  What immediately sprung to mind was the bottom of Boroughloch, although it's obviously changed a bit since the photo was taken.  Saying that I'm sure that whole area down there has changed. Can't screen shot off Google maps/satellite but it ties in, kinda.

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luckyBatistuta
4 minutes ago, ArcticJambo said:

Very fair assumption.  What immediately sprung to mind was the bottom of Boroughloch, although it's obviously changed a bit since the photo was taken.  Saying that I'm sure that whole area down there has changed. Can't screen shot off Google maps/satellite but it ties in, kinda.

 

My initial reaction to the picture was that it might be where George Square meets George Square Lane. Don’t know if the peak of the building to the right is a clue, looks a bit like a church maybe. The only problem is, pretty much everything around there has been destroyed over the years, with the university buildings now sitting on most of it.

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Jambo-Jimbo
19 minutes ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

You should maybe try and get in touch with the lady that I’ve highlighted below...

 

THE year is 1846. In a slum house at the bottom of the Royal Mile, a spirit seller is slowly dying from cholera.

Once a proud merchant plying his trade from an Edinburgh shop, he is now bed-ridden and weak from the disease - continuously vomiting due to the unclean water he has been drinking for years. 

 

Outside his small flat in the Canongate, there are open drains, filth and rubbish on the street where bare-footed children are playing. Lines of washing hung out to dry in the back closes are starting to turn grimy again thanks to the smoke and pollution that chokes the city. 

 

His shop has been closed for weeks, leaving his family poor and hungry as there is no money being earned. Their landlord, a powerful town elder and councillor, has just taken most of their savings as rent for their tiny flat. 

 

As he lies on the bed in agony, his doting daughter is trying to play down her own horrific condition as she tends to his illness. Since he is so weak, he hasn't noticed her cough getting worse or realised that she too is getting weaker - slowly succumbing to a dreadful wasting disease that has already claimed the lives of thousands across the city. It is the first sign of consumption, or tuberculosis. She will be dead in less than a month, following the same fate as her older sister who perished from fever two years beforehand. 

For the merchant, 54-year-old William Cameron, time is smiling more favourably on him than on his 19-year-old daughter. It will be another three months before he finally perishes in agony from his illness. 

The family, of course, are far from unique. Many hundreds of 19th century citizens of Edinburgh suffered the same fate in slum houses, incubating killer diseases such as cholera and consumption. 

But the reason William Cameron's name and his fate - and that of his family - is known to us is thanks to the work of Sandra Marwick, Edinburgh City Museum's learning and access manager. She has spent ten years researching the history of just one of Edinburgh's historic closes, Bakehouse Close, and those who lived there. The 500-year history of the complex of ancient buildings, now home to the Museum of Edinburgh, is almost the history of the city itself - from nobility and wealth to violence, death and disease. 

 
 

Three centuries before William Cameron met his miserable end in what was then a slum, the newly-built Bakehouse Close was home to John Aitchison - one of the leading goldsmiths of the time and the man in charge of Mary, Queen of Scot's royal mint in Edinburgh, and believed to be the second owner of the buildings. 

The squalor, poverty and disease of industrial era Edinburgh was a world away from the affluence of 16th century Canongate. 

IN 1570, Aitchison was a leading local figure and wealthy merchant. During his career as a baillie, or council enforcer, he was responsible for ridding the Canongate of a wave of "harlots" who had set up shop in the area and were trying to sell their wares to their well-off neighbours. 

After months of work, Aitchison and his fellow baillies finally forced the whores out of their homes, and the streets at the foot of the Royal Mile became an up-market area that soon attracted well-to-do businessmen and even nobles to its buildings - with dukes, duchesses and earls renting residences in the close over the 17th and 18th centuries. 

 
 

But as early as the mid-1600s, the class of clientele was already taking a dip. A man called Patrick Hart owned a property next to Acheson House, part of Bakehouse Close, at this time. A trader by profession, he was responsible for breaching the peace in the neighbourhood on a number of occasions and even ended up being imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle after one scuffle.

 

14 minutes ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

No idea of dates?

 

 

DAEDD5F0-7351-44D7-9280-87C0A464B968.jpeg

CFAB25B7-C25E-4270-8F65-B285FBF6DD71.jpeg

163C1770-0C18-4AF7-9E74-AD1C469B6AF9.jpeg

 

Wow wow wow, I feel like a kid in a sweetie shop.

 

Thank you so much, lots of things to research deeper into now.

 

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Lemongrab
20 minutes ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

No idea of dates?

 

 

DAEDD5F0-7351-44D7-9280-87C0A464B968.jpeg

CFAB25B7-C25E-4270-8F65-B285FBF6DD71.jpeg

163C1770-0C18-4AF7-9E74-AD1C469B6AF9.jpeg

 

Canmore have them dated c1920.

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luckyBatistuta
8 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

 

Canmore have them dated c1920.

 

bit late for Jimbo then 😞

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luckyBatistuta
28 minutes ago, ArcticJambo said:

Very fair assumption.  What immediately sprung to mind was the bottom of Boroughloch, although it's obviously changed a bit since the photo was taken.  Saying that I'm sure that whole area down there has changed. Can't screen shot off Google maps/satellite but it ties in, kinda.

 

Maybe one of these buildings?

03818813-EA83-41FA-80C8-5988FC1AF8A4.jpeg

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FinnBarr Saunders
1 hour ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

Maybe one of these buildings?

03818813-EA83-41FA-80C8-5988FC1AF8A4.jpeg

 

The school marked in Meadow Lane is now a Greek church, or at least was, not been there for a few years now so don't know if it still is or not.

 

PS. I'm not Greek, a mate just happens to have a double garage directly over the road

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ArcticJambo
1 hour ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

Maybe one of these buildings?

03818813-EA83-41FA-80C8-5988FC1AF8A4.jpeg

What year is the map from?  I've been looking at it a bit more too and I'm fairly confident it's not GS Lane as all maps and the corresponding buildings remain the same for that area up until 1931 at least, which if that's the professor retired/died. There does not appear to be a similar high building on right of photo on Google Maps.

 

It could be the bottom of Meadow Lane, taken from the gap between the tenements to the east and a detached T-shaped building, all on the south side of Buccleuch Place. Looking at PO1929-30.  No, don't think it's there either as the dark building on your map (and teh 29/30 map) is too low - two stories when one in pic is three stories - unless it's been renovated and a floor removed.  Fairly confident it's not the bottom of Meadow Lane.

 

On the 1928/29 POPlan the bottom of Boroughloch has a row of buildings running along the Meadows; in the POPlan1929/30 a block is added to this row north but that doesn't tie in really with what we're seeing in the picture.  POPlan 1869-1929 doesn't change for Boroughloch.

 

Perhaps not the Meadows? Don't think it is anywhere off Bruntsfield or Warrender Park. Flat ground with a minor slope down to park ... somewhere off Stockbridge or Leith Walk/Bonnington (Pilrig Park?).  Tricky one!

 

 

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luckyBatistuta
2 hours ago, ArcticJambo said:

What year is the map from?  I've been looking at it a bit more too and I'm fairly confident it's not GS Lane as all maps and the corresponding buildings remain the same for that area up until 1931 at least, which if that's the professor retired/died. There does not appear to be a similar high building on right of photo on Google Maps.

 

It could be the bottom of Meadow Lane, taken from the gap between the tenements to the east and a detached T-shaped building, all on the south side of Buccleuch Place. Looking at PO1929-30.  No, don't think it's there either as the dark building on your map (and teh 29/30 map) is too low - two stories when one in pic is three stories - unless it's been renovated and a floor removed.  Fairly confident it's not the bottom of Meadow Lane.

 

On the 1928/29 POPlan the bottom of Boroughloch has a row of buildings running along the Meadows; in the POPlan1929/30 a block is added to this row north but that doesn't tie in really with what we're seeing in the picture.  POPlan 1869-1929 doesn't change for Boroughloch.

 

Perhaps not the Meadows? Don't think it is anywhere off Bruntsfield or Warrender Park. Flat ground with a minor slope down to park ... somewhere off Stockbridge or Leith Walk/Bonnington (Pilrig Park?).  Tricky one!

 

 

 

This was the map it was taken from https://maps.nls.uk/joins/1028.html

 

It is indeed a tricky one. I only assumed that as he lived in George Square then and it looked like possibly the Meadows in the background, need to keep digging.

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luckyBatistuta
2 hours ago, FinnBarr Saunders said:

 

The school marked in Meadow Lane is now a Greek church, or at least was, not been there for a few years now so don't know if it still is or not.

 

PS. I'm not Greek, a mate just happens to have a double garage directly over the road

 

I don’t remember a school being there and I lived in Marchmont until I was 11.

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luckyBatistuta
2 hours ago, ArcticJambo said:

What year is the map from?  I've been looking at it a bit more too and I'm fairly confident it's not GS Lane as all maps and the corresponding buildings remain the same for that area up until 1931 at least, which if that's the professor retired/died. There does not appear to be a similar high building on right of photo on Google Maps.

 

It could be the bottom of Meadow Lane, taken from the gap between the tenements to the east and a detached T-shaped building, all on the south side of Buccleuch Place. Looking at PO1929-30.  No, don't think it's there either as the dark building on your map (and teh 29/30 map) is too low - two stories when one in pic is three stories - unless it's been renovated and a floor removed.  Fairly confident it's not the bottom of Meadow Lane.

 

On the 1928/29 POPlan the bottom of Boroughloch has a row of buildings running along the Meadows; in the POPlan1929/30 a block is added to this row north but that doesn't tie in really with what we're seeing in the picture.  POPlan 1869-1929 doesn't change for Boroughloch.

 

Perhaps not the Meadows? Don't think it is anywhere off Bruntsfield or Warrender Park. Flat ground with a minor slope down to park ... somewhere off Stockbridge or Leith Walk/Bonnington (Pilrig Park?).  Tricky one!

 

 

 

I’m now having a look around Croft-An-Righ. There was a brewery there and parts demolished, looked on to the Holyrood Park🤔

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ArcticJambo
7 minutes ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

I’m now having a look around Croft-An-Righ. There was a brewery there and parts demolished, looked on to the Holyrood Park🤔

I still had the POPlan 1869 open and there doesn't appear to be anything matching the photo's description in the Abbeyhill area, fyi.  Will dig later as I need to buy an Asda pizza for me, err kids.

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Radio Ga Ga

Boots Princes Street (before our old town planners wrecked the place)

AA5ACF1E-0786-4708-9CAD-488ACC503B30.jpeg

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Lemongrab
20 hours ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

He lived in 3 Grosvenor Street, before moving to 50 George Square, which would fit in with this photograph I think. This looks like it  is taken just off George Square looking towards the Meadows to me.

 

 

3D2FA728-944D-4B9E-AA70-BD417A1F698C.jpeg

 

Is that a barrel keeking out at the bottom left?

 

There were a lot of breweries about the old town, including one at Boroughloch.

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luckyBatistuta
1 minute ago, Lemongrab said:

 

Is that a barrel keeking out at the bottom left?

 

There were a lot of breweries about the old town, including one at Boroughloch.

 

Its breweries I’ve been looking at. The building on the left looks like it would fit and that’s quite a substantial gate at the end.

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Radio Ga Ga

Earl Grey Street 1914

CA54A4FF-8FA9-4802-86F8-AEA8AA354192.jpeg

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Lemongrab
30 minutes ago, luckyBatistuta said:

 

Its breweries I’ve been looking at. The building on the left looks like it would fit and that’s quite a substantial gate at the end.

The builing with the gable end on the right: Could that be a chapel? The window kind of looks like the type.

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luckyBatistuta
13 minutes ago, Lemongrab said:

The builing with the gable end on the right: Could that be a chapel? The window kind of looks like the type.

 

I said earlier that I thought it could be a church,  but if it is, the problem narrowing it down, is that they’ve knocked down quite a few churches over the years.

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Jambo-Jimbo
Posted (edited)

Update on the Baldwin Brown photo of Bakehouse Close.

 

Wrote to both Edinburgh University & The Edinburgh Museum yesterday and have now had a reply back from both.

 

Edinburgh Museum didn't have any additional information on my lot other than what I knew already.

 

Edinburgh University say that the Gerard Baldwin Brown photo of Bakehouse Close is undated although they did confirm that he was actively taking photos in the time frame that my ancestors lived at Bakehouse Close, so there remains the possibility that some of them could be in that photo, equally they may not be, it isn't possible to say one way or the other.

The University included a link for all of Baldwin Brown's photos, 70 in all.

https://images.is.ed.ac.uk/luna/servlet/view/all/who/Brown%2C+Gerard+Baldwin?sort=work_shelfmark%2Csequence%2Cwork_source_page_no%2Cwork_record_id&os=50&pgs=50&res=1&cic=UoEgal~5~5

 

It was a long shot, but at least I now have a photo of Bakehouse Close which was possibly taken around the time that my ancestors lived there or within a few years after they moved.

 

Edited by Jambo-Jimbo

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The Frenchman Returns
On 15/05/2019 at 15:14, luckyBatistuta said:

 

This was the map it was taken from https://maps.nls.uk/joins/1028.html

 

It is indeed a tricky one. I only assumed that as he lived in George Square then and it looked like possibly the Meadows in the background, need to keep digging.

Don't know if these will help @luckyBatistuta

16may 2.JPG

16may 1.JPG

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Radio Ga Ga

Colinton Road 1974

B2E89AE7-780C-49B1-B42C-318E1488205C.jpeg

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Radio Ga Ga

DAA80F9C-3CC4-4D5F-8DCD-8026D6C570A6.jpeg

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Radio Ga Ga

1880

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Lemongrab

Sorry I can't post a picture of it, as the site won't let me post a link, and I'm meant to be working :), but one of the photos in the Link JJ was given by the uni shows a similar industrial like scene, to the one we've been puzzled by.  That one has a sign for a JB Walace who was a Cabinetmaker and Upholsterer at West Silvermills Lane, Stockbridge. Thought I'd mention it, in case anyone can think of somewhere in that area which might fit the bill for the other one.

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Gilbert’s Fridge
On 23/06/2018 at 20:10, All roads lead to Gorgie said:

That must be where the Tesco store is now as the old line of the track leads into the car park round the back.

Correct

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Montgomery Brewster
On 14/05/2019 at 11:07, Maroon Sailor said:

 

Only one set of goals. 

Yes this was when Billy Graham event was on. See the stage on the pitch in front of the old dugouts plus the wooden steps dotted about the perimeter wall.

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cheetah

canal_street_station1850.jpg

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Tazio
17 hours ago, Radio Ga Ga said:

DAA80F9C-3CC4-4D5F-8DCD-8026D6C570A6.jpeg

Dangerous, very dangerous.

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Radio Ga Ga

Colinton Road

A503E8A5-D5AC-49E5-AAC6-0A9887BBA09A.jpeg

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Radio Ga Ga

Saughton Park 

0E23A054-FEDE-4B01-B87F-5B4DAEBE21A2.jpeg

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Maroon Sailor

IMG_3067.JPG

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Maroon Sailor

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Maroon Sailor

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Maroon Sailor

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Maroon Sailor

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Maroon Sailor

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Maroon Sailor

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