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chester copperpot

watching the freddoe flintoff interview madee realise that its far more common than I thought. Anyone else suffer x

fell it.

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IronJambo

Not really no, but probably more than I'd even admit to myself. I've felt I might've been on the edge if it once it twice.

 

Had a shitty year at work and some days off I didn't see the point in getting out if bed. I strangely found it difficult to even find motivation to look for a new job. Some days id have taken a car crash it a broken leg instead if work.

 

I had a few days off in November and pulled a week long sicky because I couldn't face going back.

I had a weeks holiday later that month though and pulled my nuts out to find new work for my own health and for the sake of my marriage.

It's hard to explain it without it sounding stupid.

Some days I was full of confidence, others I felt I couldn't face anything. I even failed to show for a couple of interviews.

Starting a new job on Monday and feeling good about myself again!

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Sergio Garcia

I suffer from depression, diagnosed around 3 years ago and it's good to see it being given more attention in a positive way.

 

I hid it from everyone for many months without anyone realising what I was going through, in fact if it hadn't been for the fact that my mum is a nurse and realised something was going on I don't know if I would have ever admitted the problem and faced up to dealing with it.

 

In public I was the life and soul, either at work or out I was appearing to everyone as a positive person but on my own I was a completely different. Depression can take many forms mines was almost a don't care about anything/indifference attitude and I am not ashamed to admit it often breakdown in tears at the most random of things.

 

Once I admitted to people I suffered from it, I soon found out two of my close friends also suffer from it as well as an older friend who has been dealing with it for over 20 years. It helps to talk with them through things that may seem fickle in the eyes of others but between us we realise its not as easy to "just get on with it". Talking about it made me realise the support network I have available to me from family and friends.

 

I have good days/months and bad ones, but at least now I know I don't have to deal with it myself and can speak to people about it. Cheesy as it sounds its good to talk about things and a problem shared really is a problem halved. But it really is true. Speak to a friend, family member sometimes even a random stranger can help you get things into perspective.

 

It's much more common than people realise and the media attention it's getting at the moment can only be a positive.

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scott_jambo

I suffer from depression, diagnosed around 3 years ago and it's good to see it being given more attention in a positive way.

 

I hid it from everyone for many months without anyone realising what I was going through, in fact if it hadn't been for the fact that my mum is a nurse and realised something was going on I don't know if I would have ever admitted the problem and faced up to dealing with it.

 

In public I was the life and soul, either at work or out I was appearing to everyone as a positive person but on my own I was a completely different. Depression can take many forms mines was almost a don't care about anything/indifference attitude and I am not ashamed to admit it often breakdown in tears at the most random of things.

 

Once I admitted to people I suffered from it, I soon found out two of my close friends also suffer from it as well as an older friend who has been dealing with it for over 20 years. It helps to talk with them through things that may seem fickle in the eyes of others but between us we realise its not as easy to "just get on with it". Talking about it made me realise the support network I have available to me from family and friends.

 

I have good days/months and bad ones, but at least now I know I don't have to deal with it myself and can speak to people about it. Cheesy as it sounds its good to talk about things and a problem shared really is a problem halved. But it really is true. Speak to a friend, family member sometimes even a random stranger can help you get things into perspective.

 

It's much more common than people realise and the media attention it's getting at the moment can only be a positive.

 

Well said mate and takes courage to talk openly like this about it, but will undoubtedly help others the more you do. thumbsup.gif

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Ross21

might get more success here

 

http://www.hibs.net/

 

Pathetic response, not the time or place

 

Respect to Flintoff for having the guts to do that programme. As some have said its hard to understand it without suffering it

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scott_jambo

Pathetic response, not the time or place

 

Respect to Flintoff for having the guts to do that programme. As some have said its hard to understand it without suffering it

 

Not really though.

 

Using innocent banter to take the moral high ground would probably be more pathetic, imo.

Edited by scott_jambo

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southside1874

watching the freddoe flintoff interview madee realise that its far more common than I thought. Anyone else suffer x

fell it.

 

I think i'm too selfish to be depressedermm.gif

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Budgie.

Suffered from depression on and off since I was 16. Some pretty bad times where I was off work for over a month, the worst ever being a few months ago.

 

Have found in recent years that my depression is caused by GAD (generalised anxiety disorder) and doesn't seem to have a specific cause.

 

Have used medication, hypnotherapy and cognitive behaviour therapy to some success but not yet found the cure.

 

It is a curse and it is a silent killer. You can't understand it fully until you have had it. I sympathise with all who have been in that darkest of places or are there just now.

 

Churchill called it 'dancing with the black dog' and if anyone needa any advice, support or a chat then drop me a PM. :thumbsup:

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Shapes

I suffer from depression, diagnosed around 3 years ago and it's good to see it being given more attention in a positive way.

 

I hid it from everyone for many months without anyone realising what I was going through, in fact if it hadn't been for the fact that my mum is a nurse and realised something was going on I don't know if I would have ever admitted the problem and faced up to dealing with it.

 

In public I was the life and soul, either at work or out I was appearing to everyone as a positive person but on my own I was a completely different. Depression can take many forms mines was almost a don't care about anything/indifference attitude and I am not ashamed to admit it often breakdown in tears at the most random of things.

 

Once I admitted to people I suffered from it, I soon found out two of my close friends also suffer from it as well as an older friend who has been dealing with it for over 20 years. It helps to talk with them through things that may seem fickle in the eyes of others but between us we realise its not as easy to "just get on with it". Talking about it made me realise the support network I have available to me from family and friends.

 

I have good days/months and bad ones, but at least now I know I don't have to deal with it myself and can speak to people about it. Cheesy as it sounds its good to talk about things and a problem shared really is a problem halved. But it really is true. Speak to a friend, family member sometimes even a random stranger can help you get things into perspective.

 

It's much more common than people realise and the media attention it's getting at the moment can only be a positive.

 

Good post Elvis. I, myself was diagnosed with it a couple of months ago now after feeling that way on/off for probably a good few years. I can only agree with what you said about being able to talk to people about it. It took something pretty drastic for me to see a doctor and before, I just thought that nobody would want to know and that people wouldn't be understanding and would think that it was just a phase etc because I appeared alright on the outisde most of the time..but after talking to the doctor/my family and closest friends about it I realised that these people are here to support and it gets a lot easier as time goes on. Ok there are good and bad days, but progress is being made and it's thanks to the support of these people.

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rudiatemyhamster

Good post Elvis. I, myself was diagnosed with it a couple of months ago now after feeling that way on/off for probably a good few years. I can only agree with what you said about being able to talk to people about it. It took something pretty drastic for me to see a doctor and before, I just thought that nobody would want to know and that people wouldn't be understanding and would think that it was just a phase etc because I appeared alright on the outisde most of the time..but after talking to the doctor/my family and closest friends about it I realised that these people are here to support and it gets a lot easier as time goes on. Ok there are good and bad days, but progress is being made and it's thanks to the support of these people.

 

Not suffered myself, but it does seem to affect a large % of the population. I feel for all suffers.

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Except Today

sorry,

 

Ii posted this in the terrace as i think its football, sport & people related, plus i think more people will read it & more responses will get more of an insite into the illness.

 

my family is blighted with it as a chronological disorder called bi-polar where your mood is deemed lower than your average joe, & just to get to their leval is a struggle alone, the more people that appreciate the illness the better an understanding will become of it & therefore better treatment about it.

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Big D

Possibly the best programme I've ever seen. Flintoff, Hatton, Vinny Jones, McGuigan. It's a horrible ailment. And basically incurable.

Edited by Big D

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mattyw_1874

Possibly the best programme I've ever seen. Flintoff, Hatton, Vinny Jones, McGuigan. It's a horrible ailment. And basically incurable.

What was it on. Missed it would like to try catch up.

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The Old Tolbooth

What was it on. Missed it would like to try catch up.

I think it was one of the BBC channels Matty, so you should be able to pick it up on BBC iplayer mate :thumbsup:

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Guest GhostHunter

I've had bouts of it, the hardest thing was admitting what the problem was, and then getting help

 

Having a strong circle of friends and family who understand is the driving force to getting over the periods when it's hitting hard.

 

Even the most outwardly sociable and outgoing person can be suffering from depression, it really is a ******* of a disease.

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Deevers

Had episodes of depresssion for about sixteen years now. I can usually cope with it and work through it with almost no-one knowing I have a problem - however I have had to have two fairly long periods off work over the past five years with it. A real sod when it comes on at it's worst.

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chester copperpot

I totally understood what freddoe was going through. I'd advise anyone who missed it to watch it.

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Martin

I've had it on and off for years dating back to when I was at school which was the main cause of it and I've struggled with it on and off since. At times I was just unable to leave the house and I think people didn't realise why and weren't able to understand how I was feeling. That probably made things even more difficult as it made me feel more self conscious about it. A lot of people have turned their back on me because of it, I'm not sure whether it was ignorance on their part not knowing what was really going on. On the other hand, even people I know now would probably be surprised to hear me say I've had problems with depression, maybe I hide it too well.

 

My fiancee has been in hospital for a few months now and its not known yet how her health will be in the long term, so its been a very worrying time. It's a struggle seeing her like that, the feeling of being helpless and its the frustration too when you see so much scum in the world and you think these are the people that should have bad things happen to them.

 

Good luck to everyone, its a very tough thing to live with and the important thing is to try and surround yourself with people that make a difference and can help. Programmes like last night will help a lot because it shows that its much more common, I always used to think that other people weren't going through similar things but knowing that does help. The important thing is you aren't on your own.

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chester copperpot

well said martin. Its far more common than I first thought.

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RudiMustScore

Depression can be confused with the actual symptoms one has.

 

I had a breakdown a few years ago and was diagnosed with having depression but 4 years on and it turns out that I have M.E which has fuelled the depression I have.

 

In my case the affects of M.E causes mood swings, severe tiredness, muscle fatigue, irritability, migrains, constant flu like symptoms, low immune system etc.

 

I have been treated for depression for all this time but I have argued with doctors that it was my condition that has made me depressed.

 

I personally believe that M.E is more a Brain disease than physical which leads to the dibilitating effects, after having loads of tests done and no blood disorders found, it adds to your depression that you feel no-one takes you seriously. Pacing your daily routine is a good start, but even holding down relationships can be a problem if your partner doesn't have the patience or understanding to cope with your ups and downs.

 

So my conclusion is that it is easy for Doctors to diagnose depression and throw the pills at you, but if there is in your own mind another problem that is causing this depression, don't be afraid to push your Doctor to listen and understand.

 

:thumbsup:

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Homme

If you suspected someone was suffering from depression, what would be the best way to go about it?

 

EDIT - i mean go about the possibility of raising your suspicions to them.

Edited by Alice Glass

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chester copperpot

If you suspected someone was suffering from depression, what would be the best way to go about it?

 

EDIT - i mean go about the possibility of raising your suspicions to them.

tell them to their face mate. It'll most probably be a weight off their shoulders.

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RudiMustScore

Be tactful, have compassion. Ask them how the are feeling? Tell them you have noticed a wee change in their moods. Offer an ear to listen and or a shoulder to cry on. If the person is a man, remind him that real men do cry. Be prepared for a long play-off, maybe just chipping away slowly gaining the persons confidence and trust until they unload their baggage which can consist of years of buried feellings and hurt.

 

Then eventually suggest professional help, unfortunately there is a waiting list on the NHS for proper Councillors and the Doctors will probably prescribe mild anti depressants to star with.

 

Mental Illness is no longer a stigma as more and more people are suffering from this in different degrees.

 

Sometimes events from long ago can be triggered by events such as bereavement, separation etc bringing all the buried traumas to the surface.

 

Don't suffer alone and get the support that you need....you're not a freak or a failure, you're only human :thumbsup:

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Budgie.

If you suspected someone was suffering from depression, what would be the best way to go about it?

 

EDIT - i mean go about the possibility of raising your suspicions to them.

 

It needs to be done very delicately mate.

 

Depends how close you are to that person and whether they are introverted and normally hide their emotions. It's usually best coming from the person they are closest to as they will feel it easier to open up and admit they need help.

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Budgie.

I've had bouts of it, the hardest thing was admitting what the problem was, and then getting help

 

Having a strong circle of friends and family who understand is the driving force to getting over the periods when it's hitting hard.

 

Even the most outwardly sociable and outgoing person can be suffering from depression, it really is a ******* of a disease.

 

Absolutely Dexter.

 

It is almost invisible to the untrained eye.

 

Agree about a close support network being vital and it must be awful to go through it alone.

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Victorian

a mate of mine recently intimated to me that he reckons he's suffering from depression. he certainly shows some of the signs.

 

it's easy to fall into the trap of trying to cheer someone up by trying to make them have some perspective. you can end up saying stuff like... "just try to remember that there's 'X' amount of people a lot worse off... blah blah" and similar stuff. thankfully i remembered that this kind of chat is useless. you can't dismiss someone by telling them their troubles are in some way devalued because there are other people worse off.

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Superunknown

A couple of my close mates are struggling at the moment, and I've tried to make sure I phone them at least a couple of times a week. I try and meet up with them individually for a game of pool and a chat which can provide opportunities for them to offload stuff. I make sure it's individually though, because they're both heavy drinkers when they get together, and that just exacerbates their problems. Two's company and all that.

 

I think opportunities for guys to open up are few and far between, and conversations are usually restricted to things like football etc. But if you ask the right questions, you'll often find that people are desperate to talk about their issues, and it makes a big difference. Sometimes it can be helpful to reveal personal struggles, to encourage an atmosphere of trust and openness.

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Dave Spacey

It is a hard thing to go through, no one is immune to it. If you are trying to help just make sure you are there for them, even when they do try and push you away. Some folk need pushed to get help, others need guided.

 

It is nothing to be ashamed of, don't suffer in silence about it :thumbsup:

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Superunknown

Sometimes people are more likely to open up to a stranger, rather then speak to their close mates. My wife's a hairdresser, and she often tells me that client's have shared extremely personal information to her whilst she's been cutting their hair. Sometimes clients end up in tears. I always joke that they must really hate their new hair styles, but they often come back.

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The Gasman

If you suspected someone was suffering from depression, what would be the best way to go about it?

 

EDIT - i mean go about the possibility of raising your suspicions to them.

 

Talk to your friend, be there for them, be willing to listen to them. Understand that things that may seem trivial to you may be very important to them, and you have to respect that. One thing to remember, is that it would be almost impossible for you to say something which would make things worse, so don't be scared to raise it.

 

Over our adult lives, one in three of us will suffer from a mental health problem that we feel is "serious" enough that we seek medical help to deal with it. How many more of us may be suffering as badly, or worse, but for whatever reason(s) can't or won't seek professional help, is anybody's guess. :sad:

Edited by The Gasman

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jackal

Talk to your friend, be there for them, be willing to listen to them. Understand that things that may seem trivial to you may be very important to them, and you have to respect that. One thing to remember, is that it would be almost impossible for you to say something which would make things worse, so don't be scared to raise it.

 

Also be prepared for the person to deny they have anything wrong with them. The person themselves have to accept they have a problem and when they do thats when it can be helped. I had bad times and just thought it was a thing that happened to everyone and I would get over it . It wasnt until it started affecting family and friends with the way I was acting that it hit home. Went to my GP and done my HADS scale survey done and scored high on both scales. It takes a lot to admit and often several suggestions from others to know you have a problem . Talking about it is like a weight off your shoulders which gave me an almost instant lift. Once people understand the way you think they become more understanding to your symptoms.

 

Its a long road to recovery that many will never conquer but with help it can be made easier.

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Munch

watching the freddoe flintoff interview madee realise that its far more common than I thought. Anyone else suffer x

fell it.

 

a few hobos i know seem to have this problem methadone seems to cure them. :thumbsup:

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Floyd

Counselling can also be a great solace when suffering, but someone just listening can make all the difference. That and being non judgemental means a lot.

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maroonlegions

Hats of to the members on here who have had the courage to talk so openly about their mental health, takes guts;I have never been to any medical professional myself and had any kind of diagnose so i would not know if i was officially suffering from depression but yes as many people do i have my up days and down days;There are so many different situations or life experiences that trigger mood states as we all know , it could a simple thing like some thing on the news or even just plain boredom;Suppose the only way to find out what level of severity the depression is if you expect things are not right is to go along to ones GP;My wee brother was diagnosed with bi-polar a couple of years ago and my wife had quite bad post-natal depression and is still taken prosaic for it;People react differently to mental states they are experiencing and quite often are experiencing so many different levels of severity of this mental aliment; Depression should be taken so much more seriously i think ,especially by employers ,like they do with any one suffering from a physical handicap;Most decent people would not make fun off , take advantage off or show any kind of disrespect to those unfortunate individuals who are physically handicapped , the same should apply to people who are suffering from depression; No disrespect intended to those who are suffering from depression but writing that was fecking depressing;romanovpalm.png

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John Gentleman

Aussie site, but a lot of good info. here:

Beyondblue

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Peebo

Mental health problems seem to be getting aired left, right and centre the now. Even Jersey Shore's Vinny is at it.

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Hartleys_Jam_Tart

Very personal question for an internet forum .

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Chaka Demus & pliers

Very personal question for an internet forum .

 

Nobody's being forced to answer or indeed reply to this thread at all.

 

People being open, on here, about how it has affected them may well help others who are going through something similar.

Edited by Chaka Demus & pliers

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Budgie.

Very personal question for an internet forum .

 

Very personal question for the works Christma lunch or for a group of fans chatting in the pub but not for an internet forum where most are anonymous and will never meet up in real life.

 

And if it helps someone else, who cares.

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Homme

Cheers for the replies yesterday guys :thumbsup:

 

 

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Rick Grimes

Have suffered some low level depression in the past due to various events getting on top of me. The worst though has been in the last 2-3 years when I started to have panic attacks at work. I'd basically feel like I was about to flip out, my neck and back would tense up so much that I felt if I moved I would headbutt the table. Added to this, even though I knew it was a load of bollocks at the time, I couldn't shake the impression that everyone knew I was freaking out and was staring at me.

 

This started in pretty informal meetings with just the local team I work with and get on really well with but has since spread a bit even into social situations with friends. I can be sitting in the pub and start to get minor feelings like this and when I lift my glass to take a drink my neck tenses up and I'm unable to take a drink. Worth adding that this worse when sober & I'm not much of a drinker anyway so that's not an underlying issue. I just sit there feeling like a ###### for a while hoping no-one will talk to me whilst I calm myself down.

 

I think, like Frank mentioned earlier, I either have a bit of a case of General Anxiety Disorder or perhaps leaning into Social Anxiety Disorder. I did go to my doctor a couple of years ago but he wasn't much help. Suggested that I either go on anti-depressants or beta blockers. I wasn't massively keen to dose myself so I said I'd just try to deal with it better myself.

 

Kinda worked for a while as I was able to recognise the signs coming on and relax myself somewhat but unfortunately it came back with a vengance this week at the first big work meeting of the year. Currently debating another trip the doctor as its pretty debillitating, particularly as what I think is the root of this is the constant reshuffles, moves and threats of redundancy at work we've had in the last couple of years. I've been kept on but have no idea what my new job is meant to be and I'm not that confident that I'll be dealing with the stresses of a new role that well, initially at least. Overall morale in the department is ridiculously low so its not just me suffering but I don't want to be the guy that signs himself off on the sick.

 

 

Good to see a thread like this though - there is a lot of comfort in seeing that others are dealing with similar issues and that everyone is so understanding about it.

Edited by Ezio Auditore da Firenze

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Juan Rom?n Riquelme

I have suffered from depression for a couple of years now on and off. Was subscribed tablets to take last year for it but they didn't seem to do much at all. Had one massive bout of it the very first time I got it where I was in a dark place. Don't think I've been the same person since. It's a lonely, lonely illness so nice to see others talking about it.

Edited by Captain Haddock

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The Gasman

We are relatively lucky in this area, as Lothian Health Board has been in the forefront of Mental Health & Wellbeing issues for some years now.

 

Anyone looking for more information, or even any help or support, can start looking here:

 

http://www.edspace.org.uk/default.asp?page=23&fsid=28

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Captain Canada

I've suffered from depression on and off for many years. For the first 10 or so, I didn't even realise I had it. I then took on a job which destroyed my confidence and turned me into a very anxious person (I won't go into the details).

 

I only did something about it when I woke up one day and started crying for no real reason. In the months leading up to that day my Dad died suddenly a month before my wedding day, I changed jobs, and moved house twice - I guess it all caught up with me!

 

I've realised now that for me the pills given by Doctors don't really work - I've had much more benefit from taking regular exercise, although I know that no two cases are the same.

 

My advice would be not to bottle things up - a lot of people don't understand depression and come out with the 'pull yourself together' chat.

 

If you don't have anyone close you feel you can talk to, speak to your GP about the options available. You don't have to take anti-depressants, there's counselling, hypnotherapy and CBT too - all of which I've tried with varying degrees of success.

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willie wallace

Probably the most honest thread i have read on here and having suffered myself off and for over 10 years and experienced many of the problems posted by the other guys it is good to be able to come on here and let it out a little.It is amazing how many people who suffer from this illness and i wish all the people on here all the best.

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Big D

I've found Patrick Ellverton's book "Taming the Black Dog" to be quite useful. Mainly around diarising events behaviours and actions to spot patterns of cause and effect. This won't work for all types of depression, but for those who have been prescribed Cytalopramen or other drugs to work with low level depressions by their Docs, it may be useful.

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Budgie.

This book has been a godsend for me.

 

Explains things in a very pracrical manner and useful whether in a bout of depression or between bouts.

 

41JCB8WDDCL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

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Tiberius Stinkfinger

Jesus, never realised this place was so full of nutters........:unsure:

 

On second thoughts it explains quite a lot.....:lol:

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